RCU Review: Goldberg Falcon 56 Mk II


More On This Product

  • Show user ratings
  • Check for Retailers
  •  
     
    Contributed by: Ken Isaac | Published: June 2008 | Views: 59688 | email icon Email this Article | PDFpdf icon
    Goldberg Falcon 56 - RCU Review

    Review by: Ken Isaac (RCKen) | Email me


    Carl Goldberg Products Ltd.
    Distributed Exclusively in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico by:
    Great Planes Model Distributors
    P.O. Box 9021
    Champaign, IL 61826-9021
    www.carlgoldbergproducts.com

    www.greatplanes.com



    • Classic styling
    • High quality construction
    • Easy to assemble
    • Outstanding covering job
    • Rubber wheels

    • Manual confusing (see text)
    • Small landing gear made it easy to tip over while taxiing

    It seems that every time we turn around these days all of the plane manufacturers are coming out with the next "latest and greatest" plane that's assured to "wow" us. But in this rush for bigger and better it's sometimes easy to forget the planes that have always been around. And when you talk to people who have been in the hobby for a long time about these planes they always seem to get a smile on their face and say something similar to "Oh yeah, I had one of those. Great flying plane", "Hey, that's the plane I learned to fly on. I didn't know it's still around", or "Best flying plane I've ever had". One of the planes that would fall into that category is the Goldberg Falcon 56. This plane has been around for quite a long time, but not always in an ARF format. It was originally produced as a kit, which served countless modelers as the plane they learned to fly on.

    Goldberg Products has now released the Falcon 56 MKII ARF. It's no longer available as a kit, but the ARF version does a fantastic job of living up to the great reputation established by the Falcon 56 kits. Goldberg is marketing this plane as a "Trainer/Intermediate Trainer" targeting this as a second plane for most flyers as they learn to fly. Because I do a lot of flight instruction and helping beginners out I was offered the chance to review this plane for RCU. Since I had heard so much about this plane from older modelers I jumped at the chance to find out just exactly what they were talking about and accepted the review.

    Let's see what the Goldberg Falcon 56 MKII has to offer........



    Goldberg Falcon 56 Mark II ARF

    Specifications
    Price: $159.99
    Wingspan: 56" (1422mm)
    Wing Area: 558 sq in (36 sq dm)
    Flying Weight: 5 - 5.5lb (2268 - 2495g)
    Length: 47.5" (1206mm)
    Airfoil: Semi-symmetrical
    Fuel Tank: 8.1oz (240cc)

    Features:

    • Construction: Jig built laser cut all wood airframe

    • Wings: One piece built-up

    • Covering: Factory applied premium polyester iron-on, color scheme is Red, White and Blue

    • Radio Compartment: Plywood reinforced

    • Landing Gear: Tricycle style .15" (4mm) diameter wire

    • Wheels: Two main and one nose wheel 2.44" (62mm) diameter

    • Aileron Control: Single servo

    • Engine Mount: Wooden, built into fuselage

    • Warranty Period: 90 days from the day of purchase

    Items needed to complete the Falcon 56:

    • Engine: .40-.46 cu in (6.5-7.5cc) 2-stroke OR .40 (6.5 cc) 4-stroke

    • Radio: 4-Channel

    • Servos: 4 Standard Size 1 each Throttle, Aileron, Elevator, Rudder

    • Spinner: See text.

    • Propeller: Depending on engine selected

    • CA: Thin and Medium CA Adhesive

    • Epoxy: 5 and 30 minute epoxy

    • 1/2" Foam Rubber

    • Switch mount

    • 2-1/4" Spinner

    Actual Flying Weight: 5 lbs 3 oz.
    Engine Used: OS 46 AX ABL, w/muffler
    Radio Used: Airtronics RD6000
    Channels Used: 4 total - Ailerons, elevator, throttle, and rudder.
    Servos Used: Futaba S9001 Coreless BB
    , 4 ea (1 ailerons, 1 elevator, 1 rudder, & 1 throttle)
    Prop Used: Master Airscrew 11x7

    Tools and supplies needed for assembly:

    • Modeling or utility knife

    • Work surface (24" x 70")

    • Electric Drill

    • 1/16", 3/32". 1/8", 5/32", 1/4" drill bits

    • Small standard & phillips screwdrivers

    • Masking tape

    • 36" ruler or tape measure

    • Needle nose pliers

    • Flexible straight-edge

    • T-square

    • 30-60-90° x 6" triangle

    • Soft pencil

    • Straight or "T" pins

    • Adjustable wrench

    • Wire Cutter

    • Optional heat gun/covering iron

    • Acid brush


    Unpacking The Box

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look

    The Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II arrived in a flat cardboard box that measures 42" x 15" x 5". The outside of the box is glossy printed and has enough pictures provided to give anybody looking at the box a good idea of the plane that is packaged inside. The outside of the box is printed with the features of the plane as well as a list of items that are required to complete the plane. Inside the box cardboard dividers are used to help protect the components from damage. All of the major components are individually bagged in plastic bags as well as one bag containing all the small hardware that is included with the plane. I do want to make one note on this packaging. After removing all of the components of the plane the smaller pushrods in the kit had worked their way out of the bag they were in and were rolling around loose inside of the box. So make sure you double-check the box to ensure that everything has been removed before throwing the box away.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look

    Unpacking the components of the plane shows that they were well protected, as there was no damage to anything in the box. As I unpacked the components one thing immediately struck me about this plane: the covering job. I think that I can safely say that this plane has the best covering job of any ARF I have ever seen. I found only two small wrinkles on the entire plane, and I had to look very hard to find those! Included with the Falcon 56 is a full set of color decals to dress up the Falcon.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - First Look

    All of the hardware included with the Falcon was of good quality. I did like the fact that the hardware for the plane included rubber wheels instead of foam as many other ARF's on the market use. One thing of interest in the plane was the engine mount used. It consists of plywood rails that the engine is mounted on and those rails are then mounted to the plane. This is an older type of engine mount used for many years in the past, but as a testament to how well this works it is still being used on planes such as the Falcon. I guess the old saying is correct here, "If it aint broke, don't fix it!"


    The Manual

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - The Manual Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - The Manual Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - The Manual

    While the manual did a great job of getting through the assembly of the plane, there were a few problems that I found with the manual. First of all, overall the manual is a very good document that will easily step the modeler through getting their plane put together and ready to fly. All of the assembly steps are well documented and do a very good job of explaining what needs to be done in each step. In addition, pictures to show what needs to be done accompany each step. While the pictures are only in black and white, they are very clear and show in great detail the step that needs to be done. At the beginning of each section there is a check list of items that will be needed for each step which will help the modeler prepare for each step as they progress through the assembly of the plane. Also, there are "check boxes" on each step that the modeler can use to document their progress as the get the Falcon 56 ready to fly.

    While overall the manual was a very good document and much better than many other kits on the market today, there were still a few faults in it that I think are worth mentioning here.

    • No parts inventory in the front of the manual. This is something that I see more and more in the industry and I really wish that manufacturers would include an inventory in the front of the manuals. This allows the modeler to easily go through all the parts of the plane and ensure that everything is present. Without an inventory in the front of the manual I had to go through each page of the manual to ensure that I had everything, and this took a lot of extra time, which could have been avoided by an inventory list.
    • There were several points in the manual were it was inconsistent in it's documentation. For instance, in the section for assembling the pushrods there were measurements listed in both inches and millimeters. While either measurement is perfectly acceptable it's a bit confusing to have both measurements listed in the manual. It would have been easier to just stick to one set of measurements.
    • The manual states that items are required that weren't actually needed. For instance, the manual lists that 5 standard servos are required where only 4 are actually used. Also, the manual lists that a Y-harness is required and it isn't.
      Pictures in the manual seem to be from different planes. For instance, in the section talking about mounting the engine it show pictures that are clearly from two different planes. While it still explains the steps being discussed, having different pictures could lead to confusion for some modelers.

    Removing Wrinkles From Covering

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering

    As I said a little bit earlier, this plane has to have the best covering job of any ARF that I have ever seen. It came out of the box with the covering very tight and there were very few wrinkles in the covering. To be exact, I had to look really hard to find wrinkles in the covering. Even though the covering looks great coming out of the box, it's still a good idea to go ahead and go over it with a heat gun and a covering iron. This will remove any wrinkles that might be there, attach the covering to the plane structure, and fully tighten the covering so that it won't develop wrinkles later on. To accomplish this I used a heat gun, a bare covering iron, and a covering iron that has a hot sock on it to prevent scratching the covering. Use the chart below as a guide for the temperature settings when working the covering of the Falcon 56.

    Covering Temperature Ranges

    Adhesive Activates 220° F (104° C)
    Shrink Begins 300° F (148° C)
    Maximum Shrinkage 350° F (177° C)

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering

    I've got a pretty standard routine that I use whenever I'm dealing with the covering on an ARF. First I use the uncovered iron to go over all of the edges of the covering on the plane. This includes all areas such as the wing saddle and inside of hatch areas as well. Also don't forget to go over any seams where two pieces of covering material are joined. It's really important to do this in order to ensure that the covering edges are firmly ironed down. If not they risk pulling loose as we start shrinking the covering. After the edges are all sealed the next step is to shrink the covering. Use a heat gun to shrink all of the covering. Even though the covering may not have any wrinkles it's still important to shrink the covering as this will help prevent the covering from wrinkling later on. After finishing up with the heat gun the last step is to go over the covering with an iron that has a sock on it. This will secure the covering to the wood of the plane to keep it in place. Use a sock on the iron to prevent the covering from getting scratched by the iron.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Removing Wrinkles From The Covering

    I wanted to show a few pictures of the wing here for a reason here. As you can see in the pictures I used the same techniques as I did for the rest of the plane, with one small exception. I didn't get the edge of the blue covering firmly secured to the covering below it, and when I hit it with the heat gun it had bad results. As you can see in the last picture, the heat caused the blue to "pucker" and pull away from the covering below it. Make sure that all the edges are completely sealed before shrinking with a heat gun. When this pucker happens the only way to repair it is to use Monokote and put a small strip over the affected area.


    Aileron Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation

    All of the control surfaces on the Falcon 56 MKII are attached using standard CA hinges. The ailerons are operated by torque rods attached to one aileron servo located on the center of the wing. The first step to installing the CA hinges is to place a small pin in the center of each hinge. This is done in order to keep the hinge from being pushed too far into either side as they are installed. Place the hinges into the pre-cut slots on the trailing edge of the wing in preparation to installing the ailerons. As each aileron is installed epoxy is used to secure the aileron to each torque rod. Before applying epoxy use sandpaper to rough up the torque rods in order for the epoxy to have more surface to "grip" to. Before actually applying epoxy it might be a good idea to practice how you are going to install the aileron to the wing. This will let you work out exactly how you are going to proceed as the aileron is installed. Apply epoxy to the pre-cut slot in the aileron, making sure to get epoxy down in the hole for the torque rod arm. Now slide the aileron onto the previously installed CA hinges and slide the aileron into place.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Installation

    Before applying CA to the hinges the wing will have to set while the epoxy cures. To hold the aileron in place while the epoxy cures there are several things that need to be done. First place plastic sheet between the torque rod and the trailing edge of the wing. This is done so that epoxy will not get into this gap and cause the ailerons to not operate properly. I used a small straight edge slipped behind the torque rods to ensure that the torque rod is fully pushed into the slot in the aileron. Use tape to hold everything in place while the epoxy cures. Once the torque rods are set the CA hinges can now be attached. Flex the aileron in one direction and apply 4-5 drops of CA to each hinge. Then turn the wing over and flex the aileron in the other direction and apply 4-5 more drops of CA to the other side of each hinge. Allow the CA to fully set and then flex the aileron several times in both directions. One last thing to check is that there is no excess epoxy built up on the torque rod or in the gap between the aileron and trailing edge of the wing. If there is any build-up simply use the tip of a hobby knife to "pick" the epoxy out of the gap. Make sure that each aileron moves freely in both directions.


    Joining The Wing Halves

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves

    The Falcon 56 has a two-piece wing, which is joined using a plywood dihedral brace to set the proper dihedral angle in the wing. One thing that I stress to a lot of people when doing steps like joining the wing halves is to test fit everything before using any adhesives. Also, it's important to practice putting your parts together dry. This will help prevent making mistakes after the epoxy is applied. As I was test fitting the wing halves together I noticed that the dihedral brace would slip into the sockets in the wings a bit farther than half way. So to keep the brace in the proper position I simply stuck a couple of straight pins into the brace at the center point. To join the wing halves I used 30-minute epoxy so I would have plenty of time to join the parts before the epoxy set. I applied epoxy to the engine outer edge of the wing half as well as into the dihedral brace socket. And lastly, before putting the brace into the wing half I applied a coat of epoxy to one half of the brace as well.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Joining The Wing Halves

    With the epoxy applied to one half of the wing the dihedral brace is inserted into the socket in the wing. With the brace in place epoxy is then applied to the other wing half. Slide the second wing half on to the dihedral brace and push the two halves together, the pins holding the brace in place can now be pulled out. Before securing the two wings halved together take some time to clean up any epoxy that has been squeezed out between the wing halves. A paper towel with a bit of alcohol on it will make quick work of cleaning up the epoxy. After the joint is cleaned up use tape to hold the wing halves together while the epoxy sets. Set the wing out of the way and allow time for the epoxy to properly set before removing the tape.


    Aileron Servo Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation

    Next up is to install the aileron servo. The Falcon 56 uses a pre-assembled hardwood mount that will need to be glued in place after the wing halves are joined. The wing already has the cutout in to accommodate the aileron servo so this will be used to position the servo mount. Place the mount in position over the cutout and mark the location. I prefer to use Sharpie markers for marking such things because it is easy to clean up with a cloth and a bit of alcohol. After the position is marked the covering will need to be removed. While the instructions call for using a hobby knife to cut away the covering I prefer to not use them. It's too easy to cut too deeply into the wood and weaken the structure. I prefer to use a soldering iron to melt away the covering. Simply draw a hot soldering iron along your marked line to melt the covering, and then remove the covering from your marked area. Use medium or thick CA to glue the servo mount into place after the covering is removed. Next place the aileron servo I mount in order to mark the location for the servo mounting holes. I like to use the Great Planes Dead Center Hole locator for marking holes. It's easy to use and does a great job of marking the true center of the hole.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation

    After marking the mounting holes they are drilled out with a small drill bit. Use the servo mounting screws to cut threads into the mounting hole. After cutting the threads wick a little bit of CA into the threads to harden the wood. Make sure that the CA is completely dry before putting the screws in place. Mount the servo in place in the servo mount.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation

    After mounting the aileron servo the torque rods and pushrods are installed. The horn brackets are screwed into place on the torque rods, making sure that each horn is screwed in place by the same amount on each torque rod. Next assemble two 10" pushrods by screwing the metal clevises in place on each toque rod. When preparing the torque rods I like to ensure that the ailerons are centered. To do this I use craft sticks (popsicle sticks) and a clamp. Place a stick on each side of the wing and then place a clamp in place. This will keep the aileron in the neutral center position while the pushrods are measured and assembled. Next attach a pushrod to each horn on the torque rods. Before bending the pushrods center the aileron servo in order to bend the pushrods to the proper length. Using a pair of pliers mark the length of the pushrod and then bend the rods upwards at a 90 degree angle. If it is difficult to bend the rods in place you can mark them with a pen and then remove them from the wing in order to bend them.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Aileron Servo Installation

    After the rods are bent I then assembled them in place on the servo control arm using the provided L-brackets. After each pushrod is connected to the servo arm then snip off the excess pushrod.


    Stab and Elevator Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    Up next are the vertical stabilizer and the elevator assembly and installation. The installation steps were a bit different for the Falcon 56 than most other planes that I've seen. The horizontal and vertical stabilizer is first assembled together and then attached to the plane. The first step here is to trim the covering off of the bottom of the vertical stabilizer in preparation for gluing it in place. First place the stab in position and use a marker to trace a cut line on the stab. The instructions call for cutting the covering to remove it, but as I stated above I prefer to use a soldering iron to prevent cutting too deep and weakening the structure. After trimming away the covering 30-minute epoxy is mixed and applied to the bottom portion of the stab.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    The stab is then inserted into place on the horizontal stabilizer. Use a paper towel with alcohol on it to clean up any epoxy that gets squeezed out of the joint. Use tape to hold the stab in position while the epoxy sets. Using a square helps to ensure that they stab is properly aligned with the horizontal stabilizer.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    Before attaching the stab assembly to the fuselage check to ensure that the horizontal stabilizer is level with the wing when viewed from behind the plane. If it's not level sand down one side of the fuselage until it is level with the wings. Before attaching the assembly ensure the covering on the underside of the horizontal stabilizer is removed as well as the covering under the forward position of the vertical stab.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    Apply 30-minute epoxy to the fuselage saddle and the strip of covering you removed for the vertical stab. Position the assembly in place and wipe any excess epoxy away. Use tape, or other means, to secure the assembly in place while the epoxy sets.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    The elevator consists of two panels connected with a joiner rod. Before epoxying the rod in place check the alignment on it when installed to ensure that the leading edge of the elevators form a straight line. If not, simply flex the joiner rod to adjust the alignment. Rough up the joiner rod with sandpaper and then epoxy it in place on the elevator halves.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Stab and Elevator Installation

    The elevators are hinged using standard CA hinges. They are installed in the same manner as the ailerons earlier in the assembly process, so I won't go into the steps again here.


    Rudder Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Rudder Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Rudder Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Rudder Installation

    After attaching the elevator the rudder is then hinged in place to complete the assembly of the tail section of the plane. Once again CA hinges are used following the instructions outlined earlier.


    Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation

    The pushrods for the Falcon are made by a method that has been used for years to build light yet strong pushrods. The pushrods are constructed from dowel rods with metal pushrods attached to each end of the dowel, using heat shrink to hold the metal portions in place. The first step to building the pushrods is to bend approximately 1/4" of the threaded end to a 90 degree bend. The dowel portions of the pushrods have a groove with a hole drilled through it to accommodate the metal ends. Insert the bent portion of the metal rod into the hole drilled through the dowel, and then fit the rod into the groove in the dowel. A piece of heat shrink is then slid over this and heated to secure the metal portion to the wooden dowel.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation

    Before installing the pushrods down through the fuselage the exits need to be cut out. A sharp hobby knife makes short work of doing this. Once the pushrods are run down through the fuselage screw a clevis on each one. Connect the clevis to the rudder control horn and place it into position on the rudder. Mark the hole locations and drill the holes with a small drill bit. Harden the drilled holes with thin CA. When the CA has dried install the control horn into place on the rudder. The control horn for the elevators is installed in the same manner.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation

    After installing the control horns the pushrods now need to be cut to the proper length. In the same manner that we centered the ailerons use two craft sticks and clamps to center the elevator and rudder when installing the pushrods. Set the servo arms to the center position and mark where the pushrods need to be bent.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Pushrods, Control Horns, and Servo Installation

    Use a pair of pliers to bend the pushrod to a 90-degree angle. Using the L-bracket as a guide clip off the excess pushrod. Then install the pushrods to the appropriate servos.


    Mounting the Engine and Fuel Tank

    The method used to mount the engine on the Falcon 56 is a bit different than some may be used to these days. Instead of an engine mount that bolts to the firewall the Falcon mounts directly to frame rails that are part of the fuselage structure. The engine is bolted to a "U" shaped mount which is then fastened to the frame rails of the plane. This method of mounting engines has been around for decades and does hold some advantages to the new engine mountings.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    The engine compartment is bare wood and will need to be sealed to prevent fuel and exhaust reside from soaking into the wood and weakening it. Where there are many methods for fuel proofing I prefer to use epoxy applied with heat to accomplish this. Using 30-minute epoxy apply a "blob" of epoxy with a disposable brush and heat it with a covering heat gun. This will thin out the epoxy to the consistency of water, which will let you brush it to cover the bare wood. Heating epoxy like this also allows it to soak into the pores of the wood which I feel will better seal it. In addition to the engine compartment the fuel tank compartment also needs to be sealed. This needs to be done so that fuel leaking from the tank won't soak into the fuselage and weaken it.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    The inside slot on the wooden mounting bracket for the engine was a bit narrow to fit the OS 46 AX that was used on this plane. This required that approximately 1/8" be trimmed from each arm of the bracket on the inside of the bracket. This was easily accomplished with a scroll saw, but a handheld saw could get it done just as easily.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    Test fitting the engine in the plane shows that the 46 AX will sit at the very back of the mounting bracket. Using a clamp to hold the engine in place makes it very easy to mark the mounting holes using a Dead Center Locator.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    After marking the mounting holes they are then drilled out.


    Engine Spotlight

    OS 46 AX ABL
    w/muffler

    Price: $109.99
    Displacement:
    0.455 cu in (7.5 cc)
    Bore: 0.866 in (22.0 mm)
    Stroke: 0.772 in (19.6 mm)
    Practical rpm: 2,000-17,000
    Output: 1.65 hp @ 16,000 rpm
    Weight w/muffler: 17.2 oz (489 g)
    Includes: #A3 glow plug, E-3010 muffler
    Requires: glow fuel, prop
    Recommended Props: 10.5x6, 11x6-8, 12x6-7

    As the replacement for the high-performance 46FX, it's no wonder that the .46 AX shares many of its features. The raw power. A remote needle valve. Mounting bolt patterns. A balanced "D"-cut crankshaft supported by dual bearings. CNC-machining for the piston and other parts. And the same exclusive ABL cylinder liner that has made FX reliability a byword. But all the same, the 46AX is a different ? and better ? engine. Why? Because times change and technology advances. And because O.S. uses the best of both to make a good engine a better engine.

    • Features the 46FX's durable ABL (Advanced Bimetallic Liner) plating, as well as a new design that automatically centers, levels and seats the head during re-replacement. Head snugs down with only four screws ? not six.
    • Subtly tapered low-end needle eliminates surging at transition, ensuring exceptionally smooth, consistent throttle control from idle to top speed.
    • Redesigned liner ports and a ball-milled inlet port minimize turbulence during fuel/air mixing, making combustion and power output more predictable.
    • New high-speed needle bracket simplifies horizontal/vertical mounting ? and can be replaced in just minutes.
    • Minimizes vibration-induced "creep" and re-sets with a ratchet spring on the high-speed needle and O-ring seals on both needles. A simple rotor guide screw replaces the throttle stop screw ? and eliminates spring-related movement.
    • Includes a new low-noise E-3010 muffler and 2-year warranty protection.
    • Includes a lock nut and longer crankshaft with more thread length, for better prop nut engagement and greater pilot safety.

    View online manual for the OS 46 AX

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    Blind nuts are installed in each hole in order to mount the engine to the wooden mounting bracket.The instructions for the Falcon 56 call for mounting the fuel tank compartment hatch later on during the assembly of the plane. But I found that it was next to impossible to drill out the mounting screw holes for the hatch with the engine installed. So I would recommend that anybody assembling this plane actually drill the holes now before the engine have been mounted. Before the engine can be mounted on the place a notch needs to be made for the engine needle valve to clear the fuselage sides.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    On the OS 46 the needle valve position can be changed so that the needle valve points upwards instead of to the sides, and this could have been done to prevent having to modify the fuselage sides. It's a personal preference in that I like to have the needle valve pointing out away from the sides of the engine. But others may prefer to not have to cut the sides of the plane and have the needle valve pointing upwards. Cutting out an area for the needle valve is fairly easy to do. First mark the area that needs to be modified. Then use a Dremel tool with a sanding disk to remove the material of the cutout. The wooden mounting bracket will sit on top of frame rails that are part of the fuselage. There is a notch already cut into each frame rail for the blind nuts of the mounting bracket. Depending on the engine used these notches may need to be enlarged a bit, as I had to do for the OS 46 AX.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    The instructions call for using epoxy to mount the bracket in place in the fuselage, but they do offer the option of making it removable by using screws to mount it in the plane. I chose this route of mounting the engine as I felt it would be easier to do any maintenance on it. To do this I used the screws on each side of the engine. The screw holes are drilled out, have threads cut by the screw, and using thin CA hardens the threads. With the engine mounted in place the throttle pushrod can be assembled and mounted on the carburetor control arm. A pushrod tube is included for the throttle pushrod. This is mounted in the predrilled holes in the formers located on the right-hand side of the fuel tank compartment. A small amount of thick CA on the outside of the pushrod tube at each former will hold it in place. The throttle pushrod is routed back to the throttle servo. Included is an EZ connector to connect the pushrod to the throttle servo control arm.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Engine Installation

    Connect the pushrod so that proper throw for the carburetor can be achieved without binding the pushrod. Mounting the engine can be finished now by attaching the muffler to the engine, or this can be left off, as it may be easier to finish assembling the plane without it in the way.


    Main Landing Gear Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation

    The main landing gear are pre-bent steel gear that are installed on the bottom of the fuselage. The gear mount in a precut slot in the fuselage that has holes drilled in them to place the gear wires in. Once the landing gear wires are in place two nylon straps are used to hold the wire in place. Use the straps to mark where the holes should be drilled to mount them. After drilling the holes use the mounting screw to cut threads into the wood of each hole.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation

    Use thin CA to harden the threads of the holes. After the CA has completely dried use the provided screws to mount the nylon straps that hold the gear in place.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Main Landing Gear Installation

    To mount the wheels first mount a wheel collar on the inside of the landing gear wire. A bit of blue threadlock on the allen screw will help in preventing it from coming loose in flight. The wheel is mounted next and held in place by an outer wheel collar. Although it doesn't call for it in the plans, I prefer to place a small piece of fuel tubing on the axle. This will keep the wheel collars and wheels in place if they do come loose in flight. This little trick has saved me more than once!


    Nose Gear Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation

    The fuselage for the Falcon 56 comes with the front gear mounting bracket already installed. Take a few moments to check that the nuts are indeed tight on the bracket before mounting the nose gear. Before installed in the nose gear install the wheel on the gear in the same manner as the main gear wheels were installed earlier. Slide the gear into the nose wheel bracket and then check the level of the fuselage before securing it in place. When satisfied that the fuselage is level secure the front gear in place by using the steering control arm to hold the gear. The arm will need to point away from the firewall in order to be able to steer the nose wheel in both directions.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Nose Gear Installation

    The steering pushrod guide tube is installed in the left side of the fuselage in the same manner as the throttle pushrod tube. Assemble the steering pushrod with a clevis and silicon retainer ring and attach to the steering arm on the nose wheel. The steering pushrod attaches to the rudder servo control arm by bending and cutting the pushrod and then using a L-bracket retainer.


    Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation

    The included fuel tank is set up in the same manner as most standard fuel tanks. It consists of a clunk (weighted fuel pickup), fuel tubing, rubber stopper, and back plates to compress the stopper. When the tank is assembled the stopper is squeezed between the two plates, which causes it to seal around the neck of the tank opening. The stopper comes completely sealed so that it can be used as either a 2-line or 3-line setup. The Falcon will use a 2-line setup; so only two holes in the stopper need to be opened up. This is easily done using a small drill bit. With the stopper opened up two aluminum tubes are ran through the stopper. One tube will connect to the supplied fuel line and then to the clunk. This needs to be cut to length so that the clunk sits approximately 1/4" from the back of the tank, and so that the clunk can move freely around the tank when it is inverted. The other tube is bent upwards towards the top of the fuel tank. This is the vent line that allows the tank to be pressurized by the muffler. Cut a 45° angle on the tube so that it can vent properly.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation

    The stopper assembly is then inserted into the tank, ensuring that the tubes are properly positioned. Tighten the screw on the assembly to squeeze the two plates together and expand the stopper to seal on the tank neck. Be sure to not over tighten the stopper as this can result in the tank splitting. One final thing I prefer to do is to label each tube so that I always know which one is the vent and which one is the fuel pickup line.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Fuel Tank Assembly and Installation

    Connect the fuel pickup line and the muffler vent line to the fuel tank and insert it into the tank compartment. Pad the tank with foam to prevent vibration from forming bubbles in the tank during flight. Install the tank hatch on the compartment. To complete the tank installation connect the lines to the muffler and the carburetor. Because of the position of the needle valve it can be difficult to disconnect the fuel line in order to fill the tank. To fix this simply cut the fuel line a few inches from the needle valve assembly, then insert a piece of the remaining aluminum tubing to re-join the fuel line. Now when it's time to fill the tank, separate the fuel tube where it's joined.


    Canopy Installation

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation

    The canopy is installed on the top of the wing, in the center of the wing. To help the wing "grip" the adhesive rough up the edge of the canopy with a piece of sandpaper. While there are a lot of different adhesives for attaching canopies I prefer to use Formula 560. It's easy to work with and does a great job of holding the canopy in place. Run a bead of the glue around the entire bottom of the canopy. I like to wait for a few minutes to let the glue "firm up" a bit before putting the canopy in place, I feel this helps to keep the glue from running as much. Place the canopy in position on the wing and secure it in place with a piece of tape.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Canopy Installation

    For a clean install clean up any excess glue before it dries. When satisfied with the position firmly secure it in place with tape and leave it to dry overnight. If any excess glue still shows it can be trimmed off with the sharp point of a hobby knife.


    Final Assembly

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly

    The final assembly of the Falcon consists of installing the receiver for the radio, the switch, and the battery. The best place that I found to install the radio gear was between the tank compartment and the servo tray. The only problem with doing that was that the bottom of that area was open and covered with covering material. I was afraid that if the battery weight pressed on the covering while in flight it could break through and allow the radio gear to fall out. To correct this I glued several craft sticks across the opening to form a floor for this area. I also installed a piece of wood across the opening in the left side of this area in order to serve as a mount for the radio switch and charging jack.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Final Assembly

    Balancing the Plane:
    The C.G. range for this aircraft is 3" to 3-1/2" behind the leading edge of the wing.
    For initial flights balance the plane 3-1/4" behind the leading edge of the wing.

    Control Throws:
    Control Throws:
    Low Rate
    High Rate
    Elevator
    3/8" (9mm)
    1/2" (13mm)
    Rudder
    5/8" (16mm)
    5/8" (16mm)
    Ailerons
    1/4" (6mm)
    5/16" (8mm)

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Decal Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Decal Assembly Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Decal Assembly

    The Falcon includes a set of self-adhesive decals that can be used to "dress up" the plane. Simply cut them out and stick them to the surface of the plane.

    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot
    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot
    Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot Goldberg Falcon 56 MK II - Photo Shoot

    I arrived at the field about an hour ahead of my cameraman, so I decided to go ahead and take the Falcon 56 up for it's trim flight and get her dialed in before he showed up. The OS 46 AX fired up on the second flip of stick and I tuned it in keeping it a bit on the rich side because it was still a pretty new engine. One thing I did notice as I taxied out was that the plane would tip over if turned too sharply. This was because the landing gear are set pretty close together. I double checked all of my control throws and then taxied out to the runway. Pointing the plane down the runway I pushed the left stick forward. With the 46 on the nose the plane took off pretty quickly needing very little runway to get airborne. I turned into the pattern and leveled out to check the trim. I needed a couple clicks of down elevator and one click of left aileron and she was flying hands free. Since I had some time I decided to fly her around for a bit to get the feel for the plane. I immediately thought to myself that this plane was "way more" capable in the air than just an ordinary trainer. It tracked very nicely through all of the basic maneuvers and took very little effort to perform. I flew for about 10 minutes and decided I should come in before I ran out of fuel (isn't it funny how having fun makes one lose track of time?). I lined up with the runway and I brought the throttle to idle. From this point I honestly felt like the plane was attached to a wire as it came in. It simply descended down to the runway and a small bit of flair had it down for a very pretty landing. I taxied back to the pits and refueled the plane and sat back to wait for my cameraman to show up. He called me about 10 minutes later saying he was running a bit late. So with some time on my hands I did something that is a no-no when doing reviews. I took it back up for another flight. This is a no-no because we're not supposed to tempt "Murphy" by flying for fun before we get the video for the review shot. Well, the flight was uneventful but Murphy got his revenge.... Read on. My second flight was nothing but pure fun. I thought to myself that this plane was definitely going to stay in my hangar after the review was finished because I was having so much fun flying it.

    My cameraman showed up and I was ready for my 3rd flight of the day so we could shoot video of the plane for the review. I took off and did the mandatory flight maneuvers for a review. I showed level flight, loops, rolls, a stall turn, and how it tracks in turns. I was thinking that it was time to get a landing on the video. And here is where Murphy got even with me. I told myself I would do one "quick" inverted pass for the camera and then come in for a landing. I rolled inverted and I realized that my position wasn't so great for the camera to get a shot of it, so I tried to adjust my position. It got a bit funky on my and I decided I should pull out of it. How does that Billy Joel song go? "Only the good die young"! You got it. I made a wrong choice to get out of the inverted flight and pulled it under to loop out of it. Right into the ground. Now normally my first thoughts would have been about crashing a plane before the review was finished, but that wasn't the case here. My first thoughts were, "ah man, that was such a great flying plane. To bad it's gone!"

    Because of the crash I will have to make an apology here to everybody. I did not get a landing on tape before the crash. But you can trust me here when I tell you how well this plane lands. The other problem I have is that I did not get any still pictures of the plane in flight. The pictures I have here are stills taken from the video and aren't as high quality as they would be if taken by a still camera. Thank you for understanding.


    Goldberg 56 MK II
    Flight Video
    Small File (7.2 MB)
    CLICK HERE

    Goldberg 56 MK II
    Flight Video
    Large File (14.9 MB)
    CLICK HERE
    When a plane has been around as long as the Falcon 56 it's pretty obvious that it's got something going for it. And the Falcon 56 ARF shows what that is the minute you get it in the air. It's a fantastic flying plane that will appeal to a lot of people. I think that it can indeed be used as a trainer, but then it will serve the pilot long after he has soloed because it is an outstanding flying plane. It is capable of performing many aerobatic maneuvers with ease and will reward the pilot with a fun day at the field.

    My only real complaint with this was the manual. I mentioned above several things wrong with the manual that I felt should not have been there. Goldberg is an outstanding company with a long history for quality and I felt they could have reviewed the manual a bit better before releasing the ARF. With that being said, this plane is a class leader on the market. It's made with high quality standards and they show. The covering is better than a lot of builders out there can do. And once in the air the Falcon 56 is sure to put a smile on most pilot's faces.


    The Falcon 56 enjoyed a long market run as a kit because it was such a great plane, and now the Falcon 56 ARF is sure to have a long market run for exactly the same reason. I'm sure that ten to fifteen years from now many pilots will remember with a smile on their faces how great their good ole Falcon was. My hat's off to Goldberg for continuing such a great tradition. No matter what type of pilot you are, the Goldberg Falcon 56 has something to offer you. For beginner pilots it offers a plane to learn to fly on, yet capable enough to stay with you as your skills advance. For the more experienced pilots it offers an inexpensive plane that you can fly on those days when you just want some "fun" flying for a change of pace.


    Goldberg Falcon 56 ARF

    Carl Goldberg Products Ltd.
    Distributed Exclusively in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico by:
    Great Planes Model Distributors
    P.O. Box 9021
    Champaign, IL 61826-9021
    www.carlgoldbergproducts.com

    www.greatplanes.com

    Product Used: Falcon 56 MK II ARF


    OS Engines
    Distributed Exclusively in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico by:
    Great Planes Model Distributors
    P.O. Box 9021
    Champaign, IL 61826-9021
    www.osengines.com

    www.greatplanes.com
    Product Used: OS 46 FX ABL
    DU-BRO Products, Inc.
    P.O. Box 815
    480 Bonner Rd.
    Wauconda, IL 60084
    Toll-Free: 1-800-848-9411
    Website: http://www.dubro.com
    Products used: Switch/charge jack mount, Foam Rubber padding, Exhaust deflector, 2-1/4" spinner

    Zap Adhesives
    Frank Tiano Enterprises
    3607 Ventura Drive E.
    Lakeland, Florida 33811
    Phone: (863)607-6611
    Website: http://www.franktiano.com
    Products Used: Thin & Thick CA, 5-minute epoxy, Z-42 Thread Locker

    Micro Fasteners
    24 Cokesbury Rd Suite 2
    Lebanon, NJ 08833
    Phone: (800) 892-6917 or (908) 236-8120
    Fax: (908) 236-8721
    Website: http://www.microfasteners.com
    Master Airscrew Propellers
    Windsor Propeller Co., Inc.
    P.O. Box 250
    Rancho Cordova, CA 95741-0250
    Website: http://www.masterairscrew.com/

    Product used: Sport 11x7 propeller

    Comments on RCU Review: Goldberg Falcon 56 Mk II

    Posted by: djnsayne on 06/01/2008
    Show the crash!!!
    Posted by: RCKen on 06/01/2008
    I wish I could. When I pulled it under it went out of frame of the camera, so we don't have any footage of the crash. Sorry. Ken
    Posted by: jpjamie on 06/02/2008
    Somebody needs review this with a brushless motor. It seems to be a perfect platform for one.
    Posted by: hawesmount on 06/05/2008
    PERFECTION..,quility trainer,hope one day to be able to fly one..,to the experts standards' as well filmed just watched,well done,no ,dont think we want to see it broken to bits,i agree with Ken be a sight am trying to avoid.RON.
    Posted by: qchenry1937 on 06/11/2008

    Posted by: qchenry1937 on 06/11/2008
    See my conversion herehttp://www.wattflyer.com/forums/showthread.php?t=33512
    Posted by: bob27s on 06/12/2008
    I learned on an original Falcon 56 in the 1970's. I build and owned 5 MkII versions --- they were simply the best sport plane to have around. They served as faithful fun-fly competitors, seaplanes, and even sport racing planes. I tought many other pilots how to fly on one. Before someone started to believe that flat bottom wings were great for trainers --- the Falcon was the trainer of choice - great performance and fully controllable at all speed ranges. It is a real pleasure to see the plane back and available to today's RC community. The only thing I see here that is goofy ----- why the "way too tall" landing gear. Are they trying to accomodate a 12" diameter prop? The original MkII landing gear size was fine for 10" and 11" props.
    Posted by: simark on 06/13/2008
    Glad to see that the Falcon lives on as an ARF. I built the kit a few years ago and I have to say that the diecutting left much to be desired. I did give me ample opportunity to bone up on my cursing. I was a really sweet flying airplane. I lost it last year when I went flying when I was tired and buried it into the beanfield. It is really tempting to get one again just to have in the hanger. It was the plane that always came with me to the field along with any other planes du jour. The landing gear does look different, but after a few grass landing it will probably settle into a lower stance and look normal. Mine flew great with a ringed OS 32F and a 11x4 prop. 15 to 20 minute flights with a 8 oz tank.
    Posted by: RC Flier on 07/22/2008
    Like so many others, my first kit was a Like so many other fliers, my first kit was a Goldberg Falcon 56. I cut ailerons into the wing to make it 4 channel. That fusalage still exists, 30 yrs later, with a replacement wing. What a great airplane. Met Carl Goldberg at Toledo Expo and told him I added airerons....he asked, "Why, it flies great on 3 channels."
    Posted by: jorgito on 12/31/2009
    yo aprendi avolar con un FALCON 56 en los años 73y74 con un motor os 35 y un radio KRAFT de 4 canales con servos kps 14,el avion es lo maxsimo,comprenlo y veran que noble es. j.chavarria del club de aeromodelismo de tegucigalpa HONDURAS, el unico pais libre de america.
    Page: 1 2 >
    The comments, observations and conclusions made in this review are solely with respect to the particular item the editor reviewed and may not apply generally to similar products by the manufacturer. We cannot be responsible for any manufacturer defects in workmanship or other deficiencies in products like the one featured in the review.

    EMAIL THIS ARTICLE OR CHECK OUT THESE OTHER GREAT REVIEWS!
     
    PhotoManufacturerProductSummaryReviewed
    GraupnerV-Venture HoTT Glider ARF & RTFI'd like to introduce you to the new V-Venture from Graupner. The V-Venture is a mid-wing glider ideal for training new pilot...12/12/2014
    RealFlightRF7.5 RC Flight SimulatorIf you're like me, you fly every chance possible. Be that when the weather is decent at my local flying field, or in our loca...12/07/2014
    NICESKY Decathlon Scout SLT TX-R w/ FloatsI'd like to introduce you to the Decathlon Scout from NICESKY. Distributed through Hobbico and Tower Hobbies, the Decathlon S...11/29/2014
    Hobby PeopleMicro Super Cub Front Yard Flyer RTIt's small, it's lightweight and it comes out of the box Ready To Fly. Let's open 'er up and have a look!...11/29/2014
    RCGF60cc Twin Cylinder Gasoline EngineWhile RC gas engines have been around for quite a while, the demand for high quality twin cylinder variants is fairly recent....11/15/2014
    SIGT-Clips 70 EG ARFThough just in the prototype stage, the guys from SIG had a new T-Clips 70 at the 60th Annual Toledo Expo. Having reviewed th...11/10/2014
    Ares Ethos PQIt seems as though every model company has at least one multi-rotor aircraft in their lineup. Ares (pronounced Air-Ease) has ...11/10/2014
    SigSomethin' Xtra EG I flew the original kit version way back when it was first introduced and loved it, so when Sig's Vice President Mike Gretz a...11/02/2014
    The Southern Minnesota Model Aircraft Club (SMMAC)Watts over Owatonna 2014The Southern Minnesota Model Aircraft Club (SMMAC) is the host of several warbird and giant scale events, but for the last fi...10/25/2014
    The World ModelsUltimate Biplane 27% (50cc) ARFA little extra power never hurt anything, so I figured the plane and engine would go well together. The 27% Ultimate has been...10/25/2014
    WarbirdsOver the Rockies 2014Now in its 11th year, Warbirds Over the Rockies has become one of the country's best warbird fly-ins for RC warbirds, and it ...10/18/2014
    Great PlanesFactor 3DThe Factor 3D from Great Planes is a conveniently sized electric airframe that is intended to give pilots an unlimited flight...09/14/2014
    Hobby PeopleG-46 BL Power SystemSo whether you're converting an older glow powered plane, or starting with a fresh kit or ARF, one thing remains the same - y...09/01/2014
    RCGF30cc Twin Cylinder Gasoline EngineRCGF, a Chinese manufacturer of gasoline engines, designs and manufactures engines specifically for the RC aircraft market. T...08/26/2014
    The World ModelsJeff Troy's TAMEcat DF TrainerMeet the TAMEcat - the airframe itself is not new, and in fact, has now been made in three different versions. The TAMEcat st...08/24/2014
     

      Return to Magazine Homepage






     
    RCUniverse is a service of Internet Brands, Inc. Copyright © 2001-2014.
    Terms of Service | Privacy Policy
     
    GET FREE RC CONTENT FOR YOUR WEBSITE

    Search | Marketplace | Event Central | Local Clubs | Magazine | Product Ratings | New Products | Discussion Forums

    Photo Gallery | Instructor Search | Field|Track|Marina Search | RCU Youtube Channel | | RCU Twitter!

    Member Locator | Advertisers | Hobby Vendor Resources | Rate Manufacturers | Sign In/Sign Up

    Products Videos WattFlyer.com RC Classifieds

    RCU4 | 54.145.183.190 | 0 | 1 | 03:51:28 AM EST | NC