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RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

Old 08-08-2011, 01:48 PM
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RCJuice
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Default RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

So I'm going to build a high speed pass only car. Any opinions on whether to go with the 18T or T2? I have a good line on a Factory Team 18T, although I'm not sure between the belt or shaft drive. This will be a 4S setup. I don't know which one ends up having more rolling resistance.
Old 08-08-2011, 01:57 PM
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flipside7
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

Nope, vendetta or traxxas chassis
Old 08-08-2011, 02:11 PM
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flipside7
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

Oh!!!!!! 4s!!

Ok, scrap the rc18, but to answer, the shaft drive has less resistance. The belt drive is supposed to have less, but as you probably have seen, it has some issues, making it more resistive.

Dude, if your running 4 s, and doing speed runs, the only mini classed car that will be good here is an ofna mini hyper ste. And it will do it stock, you need add nothing.

The other chassis' will do it, but not for very long. You are going to have a long line of spare and replacement parts, totaling to be a stack of money that would buy you the car you really need, the hyper ste.


If you don't get the ste, then you have to get a vendetta ext. chassis( the sc)

But really you have to be honest with yourself here, and change your mind against th rc18, it won't work (well).
Old 08-08-2011, 03:04 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

the Hyper Mini STE is 1/12 scale isn't it?

RC18T will handle it with upgraded diff gears. you can get a set of steel diffs that work great. you can also get the upgraded steel outdrives but I havnen't found them nescesary yet.

http://www.thetoyz.com/cart/thetoyz_...at_name=RC18B#
http://www.thetoyz.com/cart/thetoyz_...cat_name=RC18B

the cvd kit would be nice to have as well but I think the factory team kit might already have it.
http://www.thetoyz.com/cart/thetoyz_...cat_name=RC18B

Aside from these parts the rc18t should handle the power just fine.
Old 08-08-2011, 03:13 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

What system are you planning on running that can handle 4s? or will you just run something rated to 3s on a limited basis?
Old 08-08-2011, 03:39 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

I would go with shaft due to the durability over the belt.
Old 08-08-2011, 05:03 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

Thanks for the answers guys, all very appreciated.  I'm a nitro guy so I'm learning this as I go and any advice is well recevied.
I've built some speed run Jatos and wanted an electric to be able to tool around with in front of my house.  I have a looooooong, straight smooth road I live on.  I used to be into electric helis a long time ago (when Lipo was just coming out and they caught fire mid-flight routinely) but I am still new to the electric scene.
There is a Tekin setup that is capable of 4S.  If I am mislead please let me know, I'm simply going off the specs on their site.
I am going into this with the understanding taht I will need to hop up the entire drivetrain.  With what I have spent on my bigger RC's (and several helicopters) I can easily swallow the prices to fully modify an RC18T.
Should I still shy away from it if I am willing to fully beef it up?
Old 08-08-2011, 10:31 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

For I high speed car you have to make it go fast with the right gearing. althought 4s will help!! but when you gear a car for speed you will actually take alot of the stress OFF the drivetrain since you are transfering the power from the bottom end to the top end. I think the RC18T will o fine for you. I am working on a high speed 18T right now as well although for now i am only running 3s. but these cars feel very stable at high speed which is really what you are looking for when building something for speed. you can drop these brushless systems into any chassis but if it isn't stable at high speeds it won't do you any good. I have to say that I am impressed with the RC18T so far.

I am in the same boat as you are right now. I am fairly new to the brushless scene. I have always been a nitro guy. I have built some very fast big block rc10gts and a NTC3 with a OS .21 V-Spec that was just plain nasty! So I know where you are coming from. I have learned a few thing about this car in the short amount of time I have spent working on it so if you have any questions for me just ask. and keep us posted on how your build goes.

When you say "high speed" how fast are you wanting to go?
Old 08-08-2011, 11:03 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?


ORIGINAL: yakfish

For I high speed car you have to make it go fast with the right gearing. althought 4s will help!! but when you gear a car for speed you will actually take alot of the stress OFF the drivetrain since you are transfering the power from the bottom end to the top end. I think the RC18T will o fine for you. I am working on a high speed 18T right now as well although for now i am only running 3s. but these cars feel very stable at high speed which is really what you are looking for when building something for speed. you can drop these brushless systems into any chassis but if it isn't stable at high speeds it won't do you any good. I have to say that I am impressed with the RC18T so far.

I am in the same boat as you are right now. I am fairly new to the brushless scene. I have always been a nitro guy. I have built some very fast big block rc10gts and a NTC3 with a OS .21 V-Spec that was just plain nasty! So I know where you are coming from. I have learned a few thing about this car in the short amount of time I have spent working on it so if you have any questions for me just ask. and keep us posted on how your build goes.

When you say "high speed" how fast are you wanting to go?
Thanks again for all the info. So what is the advantage of running the 4S over a 3S? I guess I'm just assuming that bigger is better but I'm not really up to speed on what does what with the electrics. While we're at it, any guidance on the turn (i.e. 8.5 , 10.5) ratings of motors?

I have spent the last several hours doing research between the Vendetta and the RC18 and I was starting to lean towards the Vendetta but reading your last post has me re-thinking it again...

As far as speed I was hoping to get something in the high 60's, low 70's (hopefully).
Old 08-09-2011, 08:02 PM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

3s is a 3 cell lipo in series, 4s is a 4 cell lipo in series. 3s lipos run 11.1v and 4s is 14.8v. so the advantage is obvious...more power. but with more power there is more heat and wear on you motor. when you are buying a brushless system check what input your motor is rated for against what the esc is rated for. I have seen combos where the esc is rated higher than the motor so if the esc can handle 4s power the motor may only able to handle 3s.
when choosing a motor I look at the kv rating since I havn't figured out exactly how the thurn rating converts to speed. but the kv rating is the just rpm per volt. so if you have a 5500kv motor you will have 40700rpm on 2s, 61050 rpm when running on 3s and 81400 rpm on 4s. motor range any where from 2500kv to 10000kv for these cars.

There are tons of gearing options for these car as well so so 60-70mph isn't only doable I will say it is almost easy even on 3s. My RC18T is geared right now to go about 60-65 on a smooth surface with just a 4120kv motor. but it gets hot quick so I don't run it too long with this gearing setup. I plan to get a 8000kv motor in the next week or two and then shorten the gearing a bit and see where that gets me. so far the tallest gearing I have found that will fit the RC18T is a 54t spur and a 33t pinion. Right now I am running a 60t spur and a 26T pinion and it still wheelies with just the 4120kv motor on 3s. so as you can see there is still plently of room for more speed. and at 60+ the car still feels very stable. Hopefully within the next week or two I will see how 80+feels!
Old 08-17-2011, 04:04 AM
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Default RE: RC18T or T2 for a high speed car?

The T2s are not ideal for speed runs. While the people saying go shaft 'for the durability' are mistaken (belts can take twice as much power as shafts, and transfer that power more efficiently as well), it is actually due to poor design of the T2's specific belt system that it doesn't make a good choice. For racing it is a great car once you've worked out the kinks, and that's simply because in racing people use lower Kv motors for shorter periods of time with lower voltages, negating the heat and runtime issues that plague the T2. I couldn't get more than 5-10 minutes at a time out of a 3S 7500kv setup on that car, and I have now given up on it and will be selling it. Since then I bought a little Xray (my second one of these, but first brushless, previous was years ago) and I'm thrilled with it, it goes like stink and will finish a battery (20mins+) without getting anywhere near dangerous temperatures (using the exact same motor and ESC and very similar gearing that I had in the T2).

Get an Xray M18T pro if your budget will stretch. It's so much better than everything else out there, it puts the rest to shame (but you will have to pay for it ), see pic below.

Yakfish, the main advantage of increasing voltage is less amp draw. More cells is more efficient, as less strain is put on each cell. The power the motor uses is an expression of Watts. So lets say a 5000kv motor uses 400W at 37,000rpm max throttle with 2S. Since we know that watts=amps*volts, if you use a 2s battery (7.4v) that means 400W divided by 7.4v=54A. Now take the same situation and use 3 cells (11.1v) and the SAME RPM (in other words at 2/3rds throttle), it's using the same watts but more volts, your calculation becomes 400W divided by 11.1volts=36A. HOWEVER, now that you have added voltage, your motor will rev higher, using more watts, and therefore more amps, generating more heat. Bottom line though, more volts means less current for the same power.
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