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-   -   Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061 (https://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/1-2-1-8-airplanes-70/2404739-thrust-figures-norvel-049-061-a.html)

Cautrell05 12-05-2004 08:36 PM

Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
What kind of thrust figures are possible are possible with these 2 engines? What size of props are they capable of turning?
Thanks
Nick

Uncas 12-05-2004 09:57 PM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
Norvel .061 - with a 6 x 2 prop, using 25% nitro, I get like 17 - 18 oz. But I have a bent piston rod. Some say up to 20 oz.

I do not know about .049.

ptulmer 12-05-2004 10:46 PM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
Nick,
I'd have to say it depends... I'm running a cox 5x3 "rubber ducky" on my .061 and getting about 17oz. I'm using 35% Norvel fuel with the oil brought up to about 22% The rpms get up to 22k static. Probably close to 25k dynamic. Needless to say, my delta screams!
With the same combo the .049 would get about 13-14oz thrust.

Cautrell05 12-06-2004 12:23 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
Thanks guys.
Nick

MikeSell 12-06-2004 01:32 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
I have several of these engines and use them to fly different types of planes. The thrust they produce is totally dependent upon the prop installed. Prop diameter and pitch as well as efficency effect thrust greatly.

With the right pitch and diameter these engines will indeed turn 25,000 RPM but thrust will be down because their torque peak is at about 17-18,000. That prop is not exerting the resistance necessary to load the engine. It will make the engine spin fast and possibly make a small plane fly fast but will not produce the most thrust. A prop that will not allow the engine attain close to 17,000 rpm is lugging the engine an is not producing maximum thrust. Trimming the diameter of the blade just enough to allow the engine to hit its torque peak should increase thrust.

The airfoil and rigidity of the prop blades are the other major factors. A thin airfoil has less wind resistance than a thick one but usually a thick airfoil has more lift. The efficency (resistance vs lift) controls if the increase iin RPM will yield more lift which translates to thrust.

The correct diameter/pitch/efficency combination may or may not produce the most thrust depending if the blade flexes out of spec under load. Flexable props are wonderful on planes with no landing gear or in crashes. In demanding applications more rigid ones are always preferred.

It would take some prop testing to find what is the maximum thrust of these engines with the available props. Your question as stated is much like "With 120v power supply how hot will my hot plate get?"

I get enough thrust from my .061 norvel to fly a 52" span high drag airframe at a 45 degree climb indefinately. With the same engine but a different prop of different manufacture, but the same diameter and pitch, the plane hasn't enough thrust to maintain level flight.

highamperage 04-12-2011 08:16 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 


Does anyone know what the fuel consumption on these type engines is?</p>

BMatthews 04-12-2011 10:44 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
Highamperage, you already posted one question about fuel consumption. There's no need or point to dragging back a 7 year old thread that isn't related to your question.

SunnyFlyer09 04-12-2011 10:57 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 


ORIGINAL: MikeSell

I have several of these engines and use them to fly different types of planes. The thrust they produce is totally dependent upon the prop installed. Prop diameter and pitch as well as efficency effect thrust greatly.

With the right pitch and diameter these engines will indeed turn 25,000 RPM but thrust will be down because their torque peak is at about 17-18,000. That prop is not exerting the resistance necessary to load the engine. It will make the engine spin fast and possibly make a small plane fly fast but will not produce the most thrust. A prop that will not allow the engine attain close to 17,000 rpm is lugging the engine an is not producing maximum thrust. Trimming the diameter of the blade just enough to allow the engine to hit its torque peak should increase thrust.

The airfoil and rigidity of the prop blades are the other major factors. A thin airfoil has less wind resistance than a thick one but usually a thick airfoil has more lift. The efficency (resistance vs lift) controls if the increase iin RPM will yield more lift which translates to thrust.

The correct diameter/pitch/efficency combination may or may not produce the most thrust depending if the blade flexes out of spec under load. Flexable props are wonderful on planes with no landing gear or in crashes. In demanding applications more rigid ones are always preferred.

It would take some prop testing to find what is the maximum thrust of these engines with the available props. Your question as stated is much like ''With 120v power supply how hot will my hot plate get?''

I get enough thrust from my .061 norvel to fly a 52'' span high drag airframe at a 45 degree climb indefinately. With the same engine but a different prop of different manufacture, but the same diameter and pitch, the plane hasn't enough thrust to maintain level flight.
So what is all the hype about getting these engines up to 30K for pylon racing? If you are 12k past the torque curve, what is the benefit ?

highamperage 04-12-2011 11:01 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
Yeah Iposted this first and then decided to creat a new topic.Didn't realize it was so old, sorry.

ptulmer 04-12-2011 06:58 PM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
SunnyFlyer09,

Speed! Unless you can make your own props, that is.

Mr Cox 04-12-2011 08:29 PM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
The main reason, I guess, is that maximum power is produced at higher revs than the maximum torque...

MikeSell 05-14-2011 11:12 AM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 
If you intend to pylon race flying fast is your concern not thrust, torque or horsepower. Your plane and your purpose dictate the right engine prop combination. Fuel consumption will go up with rpm along with wear. A high drag plane like a Clancy Lazy Bee flies slow and requires more thrust. A larger prop turning at 17K will produce more thrust, lower fuel consumption, and less wear. That little low drag delta will love a small prop turning 30k. What plane do you fly?

DeviousDave 05-14-2011 05:15 PM

RE: Thrust Figures For Norvel .049 and .061
 


ORIGINAL: SunnyFlyer09



ORIGINAL: MikeSell

I have several of these engines and use them to fly different types of planes. The thrust they produce is totally dependent upon the prop installed. Prop diameter and pitch as well as efficency effect thrust greatly.

With the right pitch and diameter these engines will indeed turn 25,000 RPM but thrust will be down because their torque peak is at about 17-18,000. That prop is not exerting the resistance necessary to load the engine. It will make the engine spin fast and possibly make a small plane fly fast but will not produce the most thrust. A prop that will not allow the engine attain close to 17,000 rpm is lugging the engine an is not producing maximum thrust. Trimming the diameter of the blade just enough to allow the engine to hit its torque peak should increase thrust.

The airfoil and rigidity of the prop blades are the other major factors. A thin airfoil has less wind resistance than a thick one but usually a thick airfoil has more lift. The efficency (resistance vs lift) controls if the increase iin RPM will yield more lift which translates to thrust.

The correct diameter/pitch/efficency combination may or may not produce the most thrust depending if the blade flexes out of spec under load. Flexable props are wonderful on planes with no landing gear or in crashes. In demanding applications more rigid ones are always preferred.

It would take some prop testing to find what is the maximum thrust of these engines with the available props. Your question as stated is much like ''With 120v power supply how hot will my hot plate get?''

I get enough thrust from my .061 norvel to fly a 52'' span high drag airframe at a 45 degree climb indefinately. With the same engine but a different prop of different manufacture, but the same diameter and pitch, the plane hasn't enough thrust to maintain level flight.
So what is all the hype about getting these engines up to 30K for pylon racing? If you are 12k past the torque curve, what is the benefit ?

Because pylon racing is about going fast, not accelerating fast.


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