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What makes a high wing "high"

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What makes a high wing "high"

Old 10-31-2005, 11:57 PM
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Waggs
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Default What makes a high wing "high"

Or better yet, are there rules of thumb for the vertical placement of a wing in the fuselage?

A mid wing appears to have the wing right on the thrust line.
A low wing is below the thrust line.
A shoulder wing is above the thrust line.
A high wing is higher than the shoulder.

A shoulder though seems to be an arbitrary protrusion on the fuselage.

Finally, if say you take any stik type of plane, put half a bubble canopy on the wing, and build a turtle deck that eventually blends in with the vertical fin, do you still have a shoulder wing aircraft?

Thanks!
Waggs
Old 11-01-2005, 02:42 AM
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

You pretty much hit the nail on the head. A shoulder wing is generally just a wing mounted on the upper surface of a basic box fuselage of "average" dimensions. If it has some decorations added on top and extending to the rear it's still a shoulder wing but prettier.

Where it can get a bit fuzzy is when you have a seriously deep fuselage but with no actual sort of cabin type windscreen looking area to be able to point to and say " That's a high wing design" and then nod your head sagely.

It really comes down to how much the wing is above the thrust line. But even with this there is no fixed rule of thumb to go by.
Old 11-01-2005, 08:15 AM
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

Thanks Bruce.


Waggs
Old 11-01-2005, 11:37 AM
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Rodney
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

In general, if the center of lift is above the CG, it is a high wing model. There can be all degrees of high wing; the Cub is an example of a very high wing--the center of lift is well above the CG. Most stick type models are a slight degree of high wing, the center of lift is slightly above the CG. The higher the center of lift above the CG, the more laterally stable, like the tight wire walker with the big balance pole hanging down which lowers the CG of the walker plus balance pole mass.
Old 11-01-2005, 03:52 PM
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Waggs
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

Rodney,

This is an interesting fact.

What this tells me is that potentially, I could have a plane that externally appears to be a mid wing, but could have the flying characteristics of a low wing or high wing plane depending on how the internals are placed and perhaps by the addition of some weight.

How real is my notion? In other words, within reasonable limitations, if I had a mid wing airplane, and mounted the servos, receiver and battery as low as possible in the fuselage, do I in effect have something that will fly as a shoulder wing plane?

Thanks
Waggs

Old 11-01-2005, 05:02 PM
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

The references of "high wing", "shoulder wing", and "low wing" came from the location of the wing with reference to the location of the pilot. A low wing aircraft had the wing mounted below the pilot, on the bottom of the fuselage. A shoulder wing aircraft had the wings located at about the same level as the pilot's shoulders, and a high wing aircraft had the wing mounted above the pilot. A "mid-wing" aircraft had the wing mounted about 1/2-way between the top and bottom of the fuselage.

With airplanes that do not make any attempt at all to resemble full-size aircraft (stik-types, SPADs, and so on), it's up to you to determine what to call it. Most trainers have a passing resemblance to Cessna-types, so they can be safely called "high wing" aircraft.
Old 11-01-2005, 07:01 PM
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"

ORIGINAL: Waggs

... In other words, within reasonable limitations, if I had a mid wing airplane, and mounted the servos, receiver and battery as low as possible in the fuselage, do I in effect have something that will fly as a shoulder wing plane?
Or if the belly was deep enough it may even act like a high wing but a high wing with a high thrustline.

The CG to wing issue is probalby a major part of it to but not the whole story.


PS; Moved to Aerodynamics as this is more of a question of basic principles.
Old 11-02-2005, 09:24 AM
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Default RE: What makes a high wing "high"


ORIGINAL: Waggs

Rodney,

This is an interesting fact.

What this tells me is that potentially, I could have a plane that externally appears to be a mid wing, but could have the flying characteristics of a low wing or high wing plane depending on how the internals are placed and perhaps by the addition of some weight.

How real is my notion? In other words, within reasonable limitations, if I had a mid wing airplane, and mounted the servos, receiver and battery as low as possible in the fuselage, do I in effect have something that will fly as a shoulder wing plane?

Thanks
Waggs

Yes and no.

Just shifting the C-of-G around (up or down) doesn't have anything like the effect of offsetting the center of pressure from the thrust line. For example, changes in dihedral have very substantial effects & you can easily make a shoulder or mid wing behave like a high wing through the application of a healthy dose of dihedral. The dihedral has moved the center of pressure upwards, increasing the offset to the thrust line (the dihedral will also have other very notable effects as well).

Vertical C-of-G changes can't really accomplish that.


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