Go Back  RCU Forums > RC Airplanes > Beginners
Reload this Page >

Gluing question

Notices
Beginners Beginners in RC start here for help.

Gluing question

Old 09-09-2003, 11:06 AM
  #1  
dennyjr
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 12
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default Gluing question

Hi everyone, I am just getting started in R/C modeling and I have a question about gluing the balsa. I bought the GP PT-40 MKII for my training. I have started reading the instruction manual and am trying to make sure I glue correctly. Is it correct to hold the pieces tightly together and apply the CA at the seam, or do you apply it to the edge and then press it together. I have been reading a lot of posts here and there is so much great information here!

thanks for your help!
Denny
Old 09-09-2003, 11:11 AM
  #2  
Crashem
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jewett, NY,
Posts: 2,218
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

When working with CA the technique is dependent on the Type Thin, Medium, Thick

Thin CA the parts should be placed together and the CA wicked into the joint. (parts with a sloppy fit should not be joined with thin CA)

Medium and Thick can be applied to one side and stuck together (use med, thick on joints with gaps)
Old 09-09-2003, 11:12 AM
  #3  
Montague
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Laurel, MD,
Posts: 4,987
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

For tight fitting parts, with no gap, you can hold them together and apply THIN CA as you descibe.

For medium or thick CA, you apply the glue then put the parts together. This is also used when there is a small gap between the parts. You can also flow medium or thick in to a gap between parts.
Old 09-09-2003, 06:56 PM
  #4  
DBCherry
My Feedback: (4)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Hubbardston, MA
Posts: 5,550
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

What they said. But ideally, you do not WANT any gaps in your joints. A gap is a weak point that can fail.

Welcome to RCU and RC flight! It's a great hobby, and there are a lot of terrific people. Some of them even show up here once in awhile.

Dennis-
Old 09-09-2003, 07:55 PM
  #5  
Ghostbear
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Ashburn, VA
Posts: 307
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Ask many questions, and don't think any are too stupid.

When I assembled my first ARF, I tried to glue the hinge tapes with thick CA, mostly because I didn't realize there were different types of CA and the instructions said to wick in the CA to the tapes.

Needless to say, that didn't work real well.
Old 09-10-2003, 08:43 AM
  #6  
BingoFlyer
Senior Member
 
BingoFlyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Lady Lake, FL
Posts: 352
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

I no longer use CA glues, after several years I have developed an allergy to them (guit common) and now use aliphatic resin glue and epoxy. CA glues also tend to be very brittle and lack the shear strenth of aliphatic resin type of glue. If I use CA type of hinges (seldom do) I open both doors to the shop and have a fan on high blowing right across the work area even with this I get flue type symptoms so beware or CA.

The advice about tight joints is right on regardless of the type of glue you use. I have concidered trying the Polyurethane glues but have heard of allergy problems with them also.
Old 09-10-2003, 09:20 AM
  #7  
Montague
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Laurel, MD,
Posts: 4,987
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Btw, epoxy is also nasty when it comes to allergies. I've heard that it's not a question of "if" you will become sensitive to epoxy, it's only a matter of "when" and at what doesage. Some people react sooner than others.

I use the polyurathane (probond, etc) glues a lot, and I really like them. I haven't had any problems, and I haven't heard much about problems, but I'm sure someone out there is allergic to them. It does have a funky smell that my wife hates, and it does feel nasty on the skin, so try to keep it off the fingers.
Old 09-10-2003, 10:10 AM
  #8  
Al Stein
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Johnstown, PA
Posts: 1,046
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

The trouble is that it's not just an allergy issue -- the stuff has some real serious potential for long-term health effects (that are not allergy related) and it accumulates in your body.

Go to the Elmer's site and you can find the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet)... no need to take the word of anybody here, the manufacturer lists the dangers.

Personally, I sometimes build a lot (way over a dozen planes a year when I'm in that mode) and I'm another convert to Aliphatics. I use Titebond II and have had excellent results with no fumes, poisons, or allegies. It's not the best way for most beginners (because of the extra care needed to keep things in alignment for an extended time while glue cures), but it is a great way to go.

Welcome aboard, Denny!
Old 09-10-2003, 10:26 AM
  #9  
dennyjr
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 12
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Thanks for everyone's help. I started building my plane last night. So far I have the Stab/Elevator and Tail/Rudder glued, sanded, slotted and shaped. Everything is going well so far. I can't wait to go home and keep on building!

Thanks!
Denny
Old 09-10-2003, 11:18 AM
  #10  
gus
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 494
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

I built the PT-40 recently as my first plane. Just want to encourage you to make a few key decisions:
1. Chose the "sport" dihedral for the wing. The "beginner" dihedral is too much for anything but your very first few flights. If you want the plane to suit you for more than 10 mins of flying time, do the advanced one.
2. As a consequence, you need to have functioning Ailerons. Don't considder the rudder/elevator only option.

Finally, the wing-bolt or rubber-band option. I chose to do the bands. Although I am confident that I made the other decisions right, I am now beginning to think that the nylon bolts are a better option.

The bands are meant to make the wing/fuse joint more forgiving in a crash. Well, there is only a narrow band of crashes where this will help. A "small" crash will cause no damage, and a big crash will trash everything, regardless of whether it is bolt or band. I was flying my PT-40 inverted, and tried to do an inverted/outside loop. Because of dumb thumbs, I pulled the elevator the wrong way, and looped the plane right into a largish bush (at full throttle). The fuse went right between two 1-inch thick branches, but the wings collected them pretty hard. Put a golf-ball size dent in the leading edge of the wing. The wing shifted backwards on the wing saddle, and compressed the upper fuse behind the saddle. Broke three wing ribs, and punctured the covering in a few places. As crashes go, it was a light one. If I had bolts on, the same thing would have possibly happened, or not, but the reality is that the decision is really borderline.

Basically, the odds of having a crash where having bands "saves" your plane from major damage is minimal. The chances are that either the crash is "just a mishap", where nothing breaks, or it is such a disaster that the damage is going to be bad whether it is bands or bolts.

I am on to my 3rd box of bands, they look lousy, get oily, and are generally not as convenient as bolts. The wing is never in *exactly* the same place each time it is mounted.

So, if I were to do it again, I would probably go with the bolt option. Then again, I am still a novice (flown 2.5 galons of fuel), so my opinion is lacking in weight. Just wish I had more info on the plane before I started building.

gus
Old 09-10-2003, 11:28 AM
  #11  
dennyjr
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Watertown, MN
Posts: 12
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Hi Gus,

Thanks for your post. I spoke to someone who has been building and flying R/C planes for quite a few years and he suggested doing all of the things you said. Less dihedral, ailerons and the bolt on wings. His reasoning was the same as yours, if it crashes it probably won't matter if it has rubber bands or bolts. I just hope I don't crash this right away but it seem that everyone crashes, not a matter of if, but when.

Thanks,
Denny
Old 09-10-2003, 11:34 AM
  #12  
Crashem
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jewett, NY,
Posts: 2,218
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Basically, the odds of having a crash where having bands "saves" your plane from major damage is minimal. The chances are that either the crash is "just a mishap", where nothing breaks, or it is such a disaster that the damage is going to be bad whether it is bands or bolts.
The band do help the bolts are less forgiving and cause damage in minor crashes where the bands tend to "give"

I am on to my 3rd box of bands, they look lousy, get oily, and are generally not as convenient as bolts. The wing is never in *exactly* the same place each time it is mounted.
Look lousy -Maybe more a matter of opinion
Get oily -Yes they do

As far as the wing never being in the same place you need to make a mark on the leading and trailing edge of the wing and center of the top of fuse for alignment purposes I use 3/32 trim tape for this purpose.

If bolts were better you would see their use on the majority of trainers You don't they use rubber bands... That fact in itself should provide the answer...
Old 09-10-2003, 11:52 AM
  #13  
dr_wogz
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Pointe Claire, QC, CANADA
Posts: 2,015
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Never re-use the rubber bands. And you can get them much cheaper from the local 'business supply depot' like Staples or Office Depot..

I'[ve ehard of some people storin them in alchohol , to make them last longer. Or was it something else... Anyways, stored in some liquid..
Old 09-10-2003, 12:24 PM
  #14  
jkinosh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Lorain, OH
Posts: 155
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

I have been flying my PT-40 for almost 2 years with bands, and think that it was the right descision. While I was working on my landings, eg. Touch and Go, You tend to foul up every now and then, but with the bands, if the wing tip touches, the wing will usually shift a little, and make the plane come down onto the landing gear. As where I watched someone at my field do the same thing with a bolt on wing, at about the same speed and altitude, turn his Kadet back into a Kit. Needless to say, when he rebuilt, it had bands on it.

Also the Bands are pretty cheap. You don't need to get them from the hobby shop for like $2.00 a 1/4lb. box (@100), you can just go to the office supply store and get them for something like $2.50 for a 1lb box (@400-450). This is what I have been doing and the work just the same. Actually this was a suggestion from my instructor.

This plane is very forgiving, and you will actually be able to do some basic aerobatics with it with the sport wing once you learn to fly. I actually watched my instructor to a Harrier and a (sort of) Torque Roll with my trainer.

Jacob
Old 09-10-2003, 12:30 PM
  #15  
jkinosh
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Lorain, OH
Posts: 155
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Gluing question

Sorry I forgot to click the Notify when someone responds

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.