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What does "snap" mean?

Old 06-01-2008, 05:10 AM
  #26  
Flypaper 2
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?

That's right, Adding ail just makes it a little tighter.
Old 06-01-2008, 07:40 AM
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?

If you want to see some videos of snap rolls, go over to Fl*****giants.com and search for Snapasaurus. There was a competition going on over there last year to capture videos of people doing snaprolls on takeoff at ridiculously low altitudes.

Brad
Old 06-01-2008, 08:06 AM
  #28  
Nathan King
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?


ORIGINAL: Red B.


ORIGINAL: Flypaper 2

To do a proper snaproll, get up three mistakes high and give full up, full left ail. and full left rudder. ...
As others have stated before: The primary controls for a snap roll are elevator and rudder. Depending on the geometry of the aircraft, some aileron may be needed. I have never had an aircraft that needed full aileron to perform a snap roll.
When you get used to snap rolling you may find that the elevator input should preceed the rudder input by some small amount.
Also, when the snap roll gets going it is often advantageous to reduce elevator input by a small amount. How much has to be determined by trial and error. Reducing elevator input minimizes the speed loss assiciated with snap rolling. This is especially so if one wants to perform a double snap.
Yeah, I've also never used full aileron to snap. Most of the time I can do it with about none. The stall and lack of coordination (rudder input) are usually enough to whip the wings around.
Old 06-02-2008, 10:40 AM
  #29  
Bob Mitchell
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?


ORIGINAL: Red B.


ORIGINAL: Flypaper 2

To do a proper snaproll, get up three mistakes high and give full up, full left ail. and full left rudder. ...
As others have stated before: The primary controls for a snap roll are elevator and rudder. Depending on the geometry of the aircraft, some aileron may be needed. I have never had an aircraft that needed full aileron to perform a snap roll.
When you get used to snap rolling you may find that the elevator input should preceed the rudder input by some small amount.
Also, when the snap roll gets going it is often advantageous to reduce elevator input by a small amount. How much has to be determined by trial and error. Reducing elevator input minimizes the speed loss assiciated with snap rolling. This is especially so if one wants to perform a double snap.
The way it was explained to me was to make a "check" mark with the elevator stick. Down elevator (very briefly), followed by neutral or slightly up elavator and full right aileron (simultaneously).

Bob
Old 06-02-2008, 11:54 AM
  #30  
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?


ORIGINAL: mitchell170


ORIGINAL: Red B.


ORIGINAL: Flypaper 2

To do a proper snaproll, get up three mistakes high and give full up, full left ail. and full left rudder. ...
As others have stated before: The primary controls for a snap roll are elevator and rudder. Depending on the geometry of the aircraft, some aileron may be needed. I have never had an aircraft that needed full aileron to perform a snap roll.
When you get used to snap rolling you may find that the elevator input should preceed the rudder input by some small amount.
Also, when the snap roll gets going it is often advantageous to reduce elevator input by a small amount. How much has to be determined by trial and error. Reducing elevator input minimizes the speed loss assiciated with snap rolling. This is especially so if one wants to perform a double snap.
The way it was explained to me was to make a "check" mark with the elevator stick. Down elevator (very briefly), followed by neutral or slightly up elavator and full right aileron (simultaneously).

Bob
Nope, keep full up elevator and rudder until just before you want to stop the snap. Ailerons not required but make it go faster.
Old 06-02-2008, 03:47 PM
  #31  
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Default RE: What does "snap" mean?

I was practicing my snaps today, and found when I added ailerons, they looked terrible. With the aileron induced roll, you don't get the real "snap".

And taking a plane straight up and then inducing the snap at the top of the up line, then holding elevator and rudder is REAL purty.

Brad

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