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25/35/20? what do these #'s mean?? I would like to know more about brushless!

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25/35/20? what do these #'s mean?? I would like to know more about brushless!

Old 09-22-2003, 02:18 AM
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admw12
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Default 25/35/20? what do these #'s mean?? I would like to know more about brushless!

I have been into r/c aviation for many years now, but never got into brushless technology. Well now I would like to learn all I can. I am building a Kyosho Electric Biplane and would like to replace the stock motor with a brushless. Is there a place I can go that explains in laymans terms, the technology that is brushless?
BTW: in case you were wondering about the size of the motor in the kit..... it looks just like the kind of motor you would see in an electric r/c car, only it can be tuned. It is much larger than a 400 size.
I also would like to build a wattage mig 15 with a brushless... any ideas?
thanks.
Old 09-22-2003, 08:20 AM
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Matt Kirsch
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Default RE: 25/35/20? what do these #'s mean?? I would like to know more about brushless!

Most motor companies that use the XX/YY/ZZ scheme generally use it to describe the dimensions of the rotor: Diameter, Length, and # of turns of wire in the windings. Unfortunately, that information is useless for comparing motors. There are countless other factors that could make two motors of identical dimensions completely different.

Your reasearching time will be better spent learning how to size an electric power system for an airplane. The motor is generally the last thing you choose. First you need to figure out how many Watts your plane needs, break it down into Volts and Amps then size the battery. By then, you know Volts and Amps, so all you need to do is pick a motor and speed control that can handle the Volts and Amps.

Brushless technology is pretty simple. The main difference is that the magnets spin and the windings stay put. This way, you don't need brushes that wear out to get the electricity to the windings, and the motors are much more powerful and efficient. That's about it... There's nothing really special or magical.

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