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how much crashing is typical?

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how much crashing is typical?

Old 03-05-2018, 03:45 PM
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obrien135
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Default how much crashing is typical?

I crashed probably close to 200 times in a year and a half and destroyed 7 planes. Is that typical? I can't seem to fly them without the safe mode technology
Old 03-05-2018, 03:52 PM
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tailskid
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Check your speed....are you flying too fast, making the control surfaces very sensitive and letting things happen too quickly? Try slowing down if that is your situation.
Old 03-05-2018, 03:56 PM
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That’s a lot of crashing! Climb a little higher and just work on easy things, like turns and maintaining a constant altitude. Are you using trainer type planes?
Old 03-05-2018, 03:59 PM
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I'm probably at the same place on the curve. I started flying at 70 in November last year.

I did about 30 hours on the Simulator, before starting with my Apprentice in SAFE mode.

Now I'm buddy box flying with an instructor at the Club, on a gas engine Boomerang.

No crashes so far - touch wood. It just takes a long time to develop good habits flying instinctively.

Cheers
Max
Old 03-05-2018, 04:06 PM
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obrien135
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yes
Old 03-05-2018, 04:25 PM
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Originally Posted by obrien135 View Post
I crashed probably close to 200 times in a year and a half and destroyed 7 planes. Is that typical? I can't seem to fly them without the safe mode technology
Huum,,, those are some really tough planes you're flying/crashing,, either that or we have different definitions of a crash
Old 03-05-2018, 09:15 PM
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DGrant
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Crashing isn't typical if you're working with some sort of instructor. It's very typical if you're learning on your own. I would suggest getting to a club and asking for some help if you really want to stop crashing them. It's either that or keep crashing them until you don't crash them anymore... whenever that occurs. Either you'll learn to take-off, fly, land, or you'll go broke trying, or you'll just give up before any of that happens.

I've taught many people to fly that have moved up in the hobby from there. Of those some took longer, some much longer, and yes a few just didn't get it... or wouldn't listen.

Once you learn, you might go years without loosing a plane. A key is getting good instruction and applying what the instructor is telling you... You might even be doing that already.. if so keep going.. don't give up.. I think flying an RC plane is akin to a musician playing an instrument.. you have to develop that muscle memory and perception for both activities... and in both activities some are naturals, some can learn after a little bit, some learn enough to get by... and some just aren't cut out for it. Most can do it though after enough time.

A good instructor can give you insight on what kind of plane might be best for you to learn on and move up with. Do you have access to a club or instructor?
Old 03-06-2018, 12:13 AM
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no sir. I think I'm one of those that just doesn't get it. I know what you mean about the instrument playing. I play jazz guitar pretty good for an amateur but that didn't come to me as difficult as the planes. Money is a hinderence or lack of it and it frankly is causing me more frustration and stress than it is worth. I can see that if one is reasonably good at it it would be a great great pastime as playing an instrument is. But I'm pretty sure I'm just not one of those people. I guess by asking the original question I was seeking validation of my desire to give it up and let go of it before it causes any more stress.

Last edited by obrien135; 03-06-2018 at 12:23 AM.
Old 03-06-2018, 12:32 AM
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obrien135
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Mostly the sport cub s and the t-28 Trojan s by horizon hobby
Old 03-06-2018, 02:09 AM
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obrien135
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syonara
Old 03-06-2018, 03:22 AM
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Has anything changed since this thread, basically on the same subject ? http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/begi...-beginner.html

Have you purchased glasses ? I just got a new pair. They made a big difference in my vision. Being able to see plays a big role in reducing crashes.

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Old 03-06-2018, 04:07 AM
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Have you considered an electric-powered three channel foamy glider Mr O'Brien? Something like an E-Flite Radian or a Hobby King Bixler. I've known many elderly novices start out succesfully on those.

Alternatively a three channel vintage/old-timer virtually flies itself. The only problem with this sort of model is that you have to build it, and I mean build it rather than assemble it, unless you can find one in an estate sale which are all too common these days. They're not very easy to fly in anything above a breeze but a beginner does not learn much if it's too windy anyway.

This is what I started out with, the orange model which I exhibited at a club event over the weekend. It's called a Junior 60, based on a 1946 free flight design. I still use it as a basic trainer with which to teach beginners. It is over thirty years old but when I started in r/c, you had to build your own model! I've just spent the winter converting it from glow to electric power.
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Old 03-06-2018, 06:15 AM
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I built a flying wing from a kit which crashed back in 1997 due to operator error. I built a scratch built from foem which was under powered and wouldn't fly but when I downloaded plans and tried to buy supplys in the last couple yearsthe hobby store owners (severalof them) virtually refused to sell them to me because they said I was biting off more than I could chew and I would only crash it, which I know now is true. I've tried the three channel on the simulator and , no offense intended, but the feel of it doesn't really appeal to me. I like ailerons even though I can't use them effectively. I'd like to make a clean break from the hobby at this point, but thaks for yout input
Old 03-06-2018, 06:16 AM
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obrien135
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MY wife says glasses ra not in our budget right now, not that the latestprescription made thatmuch difference. But thanks.
Old 03-06-2018, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by obrien135 View Post
I'd like to make a clean break from the hobby at this point,
Why ask questions if you plan to leave the hobby ?
Old 03-06-2018, 07:25 AM
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obrien135
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Because I'm a pain in the ass
Old 03-06-2018, 07:46 AM
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Your problem seems to be your choice of planes. Yes both the Cub and the T-28 are trainers for full-size pilots but full-size pilots have instructors and ground school. You'd be better off with a real RC trainer and a club instructor. Learn to fly ovals, racetracks, figure 8s, touch and go's before you start loops and rolls. Take it slow. And in Connecticut get at least a 40 size plane - the winds can get you. There is a good club in Milford or at least there used to be. And there is a good hobby shop on 15 near Wallingford. The electric Apprentice with SAFE technology is enticing but it might bee to small for the winds there.
Old 03-06-2018, 07:54 AM
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obrien135
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Thanks but like I said before, syonara to the whole thing. I'm gonna unsubscribe from the thread now.
Old 03-06-2018, 07:57 AM
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Originally Posted by obrien135 View Post
no sir. I think I'm one of those that just doesn't get it. I know what you mean about the instrument playing. I play jazz guitar pretty good for an amateur but that didn't come to me as difficult as the planes. Money is a hinderence or lack of it and it frankly is causing me more frustration and stress than it is worth. I can see that if one is reasonably good at it it would be a great great pastime as playing an instrument is. But I'm pretty sure I'm just not one of those people. I guess by asking the original question I was seeking validation of my desire to give it up and let go of it before it causes any more stress.
Far be it for me to tell another guy to give it up,, but if you're not enjoying the hobby,, then yes,, find another.

I've been in this hobby for over 40 years,, have seen a lot of guys try and try and try and and spend loads of money and just never get it,, it's just not something everyone is going to master,,
Old 03-06-2018, 08:44 AM
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I agree if it's not working out for him. I'm wondering if he'd searched out getting some help... like those that really want to play an instrument get an instructor and sometimes with the right instructor learn very well.

The question if there was a club nearby was never addressed. It's a slim percentage of pilots that are actually successful when teaching themselves... You need alot more money then the average pilot that get an instructor, and you need to listen to what the instructor is teaching.... then... you need to do it. The planes all will fly fine.. it's we the pilots that create the problems... so the idea is to start alleviating the problems we make. If the answer to alleviating the problem is to quit the hobby, well... I wish you well in whatever you take up. I suggest picking up that guitar again... I find that equally if not more pleasing when the mood is right. RC planes will always be here... and most people can learn.. very slim amount can't. If you can play that guitar decently, that says you can learn... so the issue becomes how not to crash... the answer might be to find someone who can give hands on lessons. My friends say "That's an expensive hobby..."... my reply always is .. "only if you crash"... I know it's hard for some... and probably better to cut losses while you can. Good luck man.
Old 03-06-2018, 03:49 PM
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Originally Posted by DGrant View Post
I agree if it's not working out for him. I'm wondering if he'd searched out getting some help... like those that really want to play an instrument get an instructor and sometimes with the right instructor learn very well.

The question if there was a club nearby was never addressed. It's a slim percentage of pilots that are actually successful when teaching themselves... You need alot more money then the average pilot that get an instructor, and you need to listen to what the instructor is teaching.... then... you need to do it. The planes all will fly fine.. it's we the pilots that create the problems... so the idea is to start alleviating the problems we make. If the answer to alleviating the problem is to quit the hobby, well... I wish you well in whatever you take up. I suggest picking up that guitar again... I find that equally if not more pleasing when the mood is right. RC planes will always be here... and most people can learn.. very slim amount can't. If you can play that guitar decently, that says you can learn... so the issue becomes how not to crash... the answer might be to find someone who can give hands on lessons. My friends say "That's an expensive hobby..."... my reply always is .. "only if you crash"... I know it's hard for some... and probably better to cut losses while you can. Good luck man.
Connecticut is about the same size as the Los Angeles basin. You can easily get from one end to the other in little time. There are several very good hobby shops in addition to HobbyTowns. And there are several very good clubs. There are even several indoor flying place for winter flying. It's my guess he tried to do it on his own or fly with one of the renegade flying groups who created more problems than helped anyone.
Old 03-06-2018, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by obrien135 View Post
Thanks but like I said before, syonara to the whole thing. I'm gonna unsubscribe from the thread now.
Ok! Don't let us catch you flying again!
Old 03-06-2018, 05:25 PM
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I learned to fly in 1974 at age 15 with a Heathkit radio and a Jensen Das Ugly Stick, (scratch built). Had lots of help, crashed 4 or 5 Sticks till we discovered there were a couple bad components in the transmitter. Still flying today, but taught my son to fly a few years ago on the Great Planes simulator and that is one of the best ways to learn, if you crash, push the button and the airplane is fixed and ready to go again. With me, it was 2 people chasing each other around with 4 hands on the transmitter. I see no real good reason to give up, there is just way too much good help and good crashless ways to learn these days compared to the "Good Ole" days!
Old 03-06-2018, 07:33 PM
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Something must be wrong. That's a high percentage of crashing!
Old 03-07-2018, 06:00 PM
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Originally Posted by spinlove View Post
Something must be wrong. That's a high percentage of crashing!
Poor vision and poor choice of planes for trainers do not bode well for success.

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