Go Back  RCU Forums > Electric Aircraft Universe > Electric Pattern Aircraft
Reload this Page >

Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Notices
Electric Pattern Aircraft Discuss epowered pattern aircraft in this forum

Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Old 05-18-2011, 01:19 PM
  #1  
smcharg
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (1)
 
smcharg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: College Station, TX
Posts: 449
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
Default Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Howdy,
So, I've been wanting to get rid of my Ni-Mh batteries in my transmitter. I've seen several people do it but I've got to be sure before I make the switch. So here's my issue:

I have the Futaba 10CHP w/ the 2.4 module and have removed the 72mhz antenna. The battery pack is, of course a 9.6V Ni-Mh pack. That's the minimum voltage of course. This means, in order to run the Li-Po packs, I'd have to run a 3S pack and it'd be pumping out 12+V. Normally, the Ni-Mh batteries put out 10.0-10.6V. If I run a 2S pack, I'll be around 8V. Now, the few that I've seen do this are running the 2S packs but I've heard that only certain radios can run the lower voltage. I have no clue if mine will or won't. I'd like to understand which pack I need to run with this radio and what, if any, special preparation Ineed to do to run said pack. What kind of mah's should Igo with? Are there any con's to running Li-Po TX packs?

Thanks to y'all that respond.

Scott
Old 05-18-2011, 01:35 PM
  #2  
Gulliver
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 275
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

I believe most transmitteres have an internal voltage regulator which will accomodate up to 15v. I ran a 3s lipo pack in my 9C for years with no problems. Be sure an balance the pack occasionally.
Old 05-18-2011, 01:36 PM
  #3  
icicles
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Canberra, AZ, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 117
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Years ago i ran a 3 cell Lipo in my Futaba Zap.

And i payed the price dearly for doing so. I lost a Comp ARF 2.6m Extra 260. Nothing was salvageable, i lost the lot

I had a radio tech look at my transmitter, his comment was that a voltage regulator had died. This was due to the fact it had to dissipate more heat due to a higher voltage drop
across it. I t has shut down thermally, was my understanding.
It is something i would never contemplate doing again. If the manufacturer intended there to be a Lipo in the transmitter it would have been installed at the factory

Just my experience

Chris
Old 05-18-2011, 04:53 PM
  #4  
vbortone
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Olathe, KS
Posts: 646
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

If you want a very good battery for a TX get the Eneloop battery. They are 2000 mah and retain 80% charge for one year. I have been using these batteries for 4 years with excellent results.

Check here: http://www.hangtimes.com/txpacks.html

Scroll down until you get to the eneloop.

Vicente "Vince" Bortone
Old 05-18-2011, 10:31 PM
  #5  
Velco
Senior Member
 
Velco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Belgrade, SERBIA, YUGOSLAVIA
Posts: 274
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter



For couple of months I have been successfully using 1800mAh 3S LiFe pack in mine JR 9303. It fits perfectly in the battery compartment and has a JR plug. The difference to LiPo is that when fully charged LiFe are at 11V but after couple of minutes falls down to 10V and stays like that for a very long time. Last month it dropped to 9,9V so I decided to charge it just to see how many amps would go in, and it was 810mAh. Since then it is still at 10,0V.



For me the main advantage over NiMh is that I can charge it absolutely safely at 2C and that there is no memory effect for partial charging. So if I have any doubt about the bat condition I just put it for 15 min on the charger and its more than enough.



http://www.hobbyking.com/hobbyking/store/uh_viewItem.asp?idProduct=14076



Velco

Old 05-18-2011, 11:23 PM
  #6  
Jon Wold
Senior Member
 
Jon Wold's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Oslo, NORWAY
Posts: 690
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Using 3S LiFe in place of 9,6 NimH is plug and play, in practical terms the voltage is identical. My old MC-22 with Graupner liFe battery is still at 9.8 volts after not being used for 2 years (!)
Old 05-19-2011, 05:40 AM
  #7  
smcharg
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (1)
 
smcharg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: College Station, TX
Posts: 449
Received 7 Likes on 5 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Gentlemen,
Thank you so very much for your input.  On a whim, I did e-mail Futaba to see what they had to say, primarily because icicles scared the crap out of me (I'm such a sissy when it comes to taking a risk with my equipment).  Futaba said that this particular radio was for 9.6V Ni-MH batteries and the voltage regulator would not handle 3S packs for long and of course, voids any warranty.  Vincente, thank you for the Eneloop suggestion.  Based on Futaba's recommendation, this looks like an excellent choice.  I REALLY wanted to go to Li-Po and I think I will still consider Velco's suggestion as that voltage is within Futaba's "parameters".

I really appreciate y'alls help,
Scott
Old 05-20-2011, 11:38 AM
  #8  
grotto2
My Feedback: (2)
 
grotto2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Palm Bay, FL
Posts: 1,046
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

Gosh, I've been running 3s on my ZAW for over three years now with no problems. And that's both on 50MHz and on 2.4.

What icicles says is scary alright, but IMHO a transmitter design should be tolerant of that voltage range.
I imagine that the TM-8 is okay with 12V, being a newer design, but the specs don't say.
Old 05-20-2011, 02:10 PM
  #9  
icicles
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Canberra, AZ, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 117
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter


ORIGINAL: grotto2

Gosh, I've been running 3s on my ZAW for over three years now with no problems. And that's both on 50MHz and on 2.4.

What icicles says is scary alright, but IMHO a transmitter design should be tolerant of that voltage range.
I imagine that the TM-8 is okay with 12V, being a newer design, but the specs don't say.
It took a couple of years for it to fail. And i do a heck of a lot of flying. (just over 175 flights in 6 weeks just recently)

Lipo's stay at a higher voltage for longer than the old nicad,nimh batteries.

If it were me i'd be running the new style of batteries, Eneloops are great from what i have seen (i don't use them personally) Life's look really good too.

I haven't used a nicad or nimh in many years, all Lipo's for me

Cheers

Chris

Old 05-21-2011, 12:16 AM
  #10  
Andy P.
Senior Member
 
Andy P.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Leicester, , UNITED KINGDOM
Posts: 316
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

I run the LiFe batt's in my TX (JR DSX9), at 3.3v per cell their safe. Most chargers will charge all cell types nowadays, just ensure you alter the battery type on your charger (if required) before starting to charge. I always balance charge too.

VBR

Andy.
Old 05-22-2011, 06:41 PM
  #11  
Mike Wiz
Senior Member
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Fenton, MI
Posts: 941
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

I just put a 2S lipo in my SD-10G today. I had to modify it a little to get it to fit. The radio is designed to utilize a 2S lipo however so I think I should be pretty safe.
Old 05-23-2011, 01:15 AM
  #12  
hezik
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: VleutenUtrecht, NETHERLANDS
Posts: 613
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: Lipo batteries in your transmitter

The 10C will work on 3s lipo without failing. If you don't trust that info, you can use a small diode to lower the voltage. One diode will lower the voltage by 0.7 volts, bringing it into the correct range.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.