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Hand Propping a Gasser

Old 10-17-2013, 07:22 PM
  #26  
Uncas
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A Hanger 9 chicken stick cost all of about $6. I always use a chicken stick, I do not care if I am the only person using one.

I have seen guys start 150cc planes with no physical restraint at all. Came to the field one day and one of them was sprawled out on the picnic table with his leg all cut up waiting for the ambulance. The CF blade cut straight through his leather boot into his leg. Many stiches.

Safety is a funny thing. People will do unsafe things because they are worried what other people think of them. Was on a huge construction site many years ago and watched guys use grinders on steel beams with no eye protection. It seemed every day we had eye injuries. dumb.

Do what is safe.
Old 10-17-2013, 07:34 PM
  #27  
Truckracer
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I hand prop but won't start an engine unless the airplane is restrained by a human that I trust to hold it. I want to see one hand firmly holding the LE of a wing and the other holding the fuselage. This way I know the plane won't lunge forward or swing around. I cringe every time I see someone restrain an airplane by stepping over it and putting their legs in front of the horizontal stabs. Stabs are not designed for that kind of stress. All of this probably makes me safer but not completely safe?! Oh well, while I'm starting my engine in a semi-safe manner some fool's plane will probably come falling out of the sky, hit me and negate the whole process.

Of course, there is always electric power,

Last edited by Truckracer; 10-17-2013 at 07:43 PM.
Old 10-17-2013, 08:49 PM
  #28  
av8tor1977
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Yeah, one time at Whittier Narrows flying field in southern California, a guy's .60 size low wing aerobatic plane crashed about 15 feet from the pits. While we were surveying the crash site, someone yelled "LOOK OUT!!" and a large helicopter crashed right behind us! Turns out both guys were on the same 72 mhz channel. (This was years ago.) Anyway, nothing is completely safe. Many of the older full size general aviation airplanes didn't have electric systems and starters. Hand starting a 65 horse engine was routine and normal, and you learned to start the engine by hand propping it as part of learning to fly. And of course before that, all the early airplanes were hand propped, even with high horsepower large displacement engines.

Just do whatever you are comfortable with, and be careful. I think most accidents happen when people get rushed, complacent, or lazy.

AV8TOR
Old 10-17-2013, 09:07 PM
  #29  
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No hand proping for me anymore!>...
I have handproped .46 glot to 100cc twins... but NO MORE....
I am making a SMARTER STARTER....
Picked up a Sulivan magatron Double handle 4-1 gear reduction... on 14.8 volt lipo...
I have seen a Align geared starter start glow, so I don't think the sulivan would have issue with too slow of rpm...

I will not risk having my hand/arm getting all mangled for the sake of "TOO COOL" to use a starter!....
I race motorcross, cars, jetski, planes ect..so I am far from a *****.. I am not going to chance it anymore...
I can start my plane from BEHIND the prop and I get to hold the plane at the same time....
Yes it is nice to go out and say " great w/gasoline... plane, fuel can, and transmitter" but who is going to drive you to the Emergency room????
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0q0q5E2IMR4

Last edited by kochj; 10-18-2013 at 07:24 AM.
Old 10-18-2013, 03:24 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by raptureboy
Don't be quick to grab the prop again after flipping it. I found myself always starting to reach for the prop again when it did not start on the 2nd or 3rd flip but one time it started on the 2nd flip as I was just getting ready to reach out again and flip it. I would be much more afraid of hand starting a full scale. YIKES! Develop good habits from the start and you won't have to unlearn bad ones
Perhaps the biggest risk of all! Especially when you may need 5 or 6 successive flips to get something to pop. You develop a rhythm and keep reaching your hand in to flip again and again, check throttle position, flip...but as you reach it pops and then you have disaster.

I hand flip and always retreat my follow through in an exaggerated way to make sure I'm clear. But I always, always (never say always) finger the spinner to position the prop for the next flip. That way if you happen to get an unexpected pop your hands are clear.

OP, you probably know this, but if you are going to use a chicken stick...make sure it is padded. I have seen some guys use the screwdriver handle...but there is a good possibility the prop will become dented or damaged which leads to a whole different problem.

Good luck and be safe!

Tom
Old 10-18-2013, 04:08 AM
  #31  
TonyBuilder
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So I have been starting my DLE55 with ease, I am confident and give it a good flip and fallow threw with a leather clove. It will pop after two or three flips, then start after two or three flips after the choke is opened. I have a pretty solid starting rutine and I don't get lazy on this. That being said I now have my first 100cc plane with a EME 120cc. Any advice on this engine compared to the starting of the DLE55?

Thanks

TB
Old 10-18-2013, 04:46 AM
  #32  
Airplanes400
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Besides the fact that I like having ten fingers, and being able to use them, here's a few other reasons I would not use my hand to start an engine.

Old 10-18-2013, 04:49 AM
  #33  
TonyBuilder
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Party pooper!


TB
Old 10-18-2013, 07:12 AM
  #34  
futura127
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I never hand prop on my giant sacle planes. From day one I have used a 24V giant scale starter. Since I already lost one and a half fingers on that hand in a farming accident I think it is foolish to hand prop and it is jsuta disaster waiting to happen. I know I can't afford to lose anymore fingers. Anyway I don't see way everyone thinks it is so great to hand prop when there are other safer means. Is it extra cost yes, but is it worth the effort of not risking some of the dangers I have read in these post, absolutely! I have my engines running in one hit of the starter and most times unless I haven't started a motor in quit some time I don't even have to choke it.

Something to think about!
Old 10-18-2013, 07:20 AM
  #35  
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Same finger, and looked just like that when I a 12" apc tip, got too close to my finger on a boat, while flying a float plane..
The boom was fine when a 11" prop but sudenly there wasn't enough room when I switched to a bigger prop...
1st airplane and 1st mistake that I don't want to repeat. It didn't have anything to do with the "starting" though....
I had a Water patrolman follow me into to the dock in case I passed out. sorry....don't want to wander here...

[/QUOTE]
Old 10-18-2013, 07:22 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by TonyBuilder
So I have been starting my DLE55 with ease, I am confident and give it a good flip and fallow threw with a leather clove. It will pop after two or three flips, then start after two or three flips after the choke is opened. I have a pretty solid starting rutine and I don't get lazy on this. That being said I now have my first 100cc plane with a EME 120cc. Any advice on this engine compared to the starting of the DLE55?

Thanks

TB
Best Advice: YOU hold the plane while SOMEONE ELSE starts it!!!!!!!
Old 10-18-2013, 07:25 AM
  #37  
coralcape
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If you use a chicken stick, after 6 months you will see the damage that could have been done to your hand. It will be chewed up! My procedure for starting large gas engines (yes, one of them is a tartan twin on a 1/4 DR-1) is as follows, Ign. on, throttle 1/4, prop at 10 after 7 (am or pm ) full choke, flip 'til fires, choke off, throttle just above idle, now rotate prop back and forth to compression (this is a wrist action, using the spinner) a dozen times, engine should now start on the next full flip. This has always worked for me, no matter the engine size. good luck, red
Old 10-18-2013, 07:27 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by tomfiorentino
Perhaps the biggest risk of all! Especially when you may need 5 or 6 successive flips to get something to pop. You develop a rhythm and keep reaching your hand in to flip again and again, check throttle position, flip...but as you reach it pops and then you have disaster.

I hand flip and always retreat my follow through in an exaggerated way to make sure I'm clear. But I always, always (never say always) finger the spinner to position the prop for the next flip. That way if you happen to get an unexpected pop your hands are clear.

OP, you probably know this, but if you are going to use a chicken stick...make sure it is padded. I have seen some guys use the screwdriver handle...but there is a good possibility the prop will become dented or damaged which leads to a whole different problem.

Good luck and be safe!

Tom
yeah...those screw driver handles will tear up your nice shiny 50$ prop in a hurry...
I plan on getting a radial gas engine, and that flip, and thinking no pop, grab the prop....can bite you big time....
Most injuries happen when Plane isn't sucured and moves forward though ....SO I am TOLD anyway....
Old 10-18-2013, 10:54 AM
  #39  
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Starters are great on aluminum but what about those nice fancy carbon spinners coming on all of the aerobatic ARF's these days?
Old 10-18-2013, 11:40 AM
  #40  
flycatch
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Hand starting is simple and effective. This being said it only takes one backfire to ruin your day. I had a friend who lost two fingers to such an occurrence.
Old 10-18-2013, 11:42 AM
  #41  
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I have started many a CF spinner, my spinner cone crips it very well just don't allow it to spin. Take your time and works like a champ. :-)
Old 10-18-2013, 12:51 PM
  #42  
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Some CF spinners are like egg shells though and won't allow the use of a starter.
Old 10-18-2013, 01:04 PM
  #43  
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The CF spinner on my Pilot Rc Sbach is thin and the paint chips off easy, I would not put a starter to it. I will use a paint roller until the engine is broken in and I am famille with the starting characteristics. I use a optical engine kill so I always kill the engine when rotating for compression, I don't mind taking my time. My DLE 55 was so predictable and reliable that I never feared hand flipping, it all comes down to confidence, and concentration.


TB
Old 10-18-2013, 02:52 PM
  #44  
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A paint roller makes a good chicken stick. A lesson I learned many years ago....focus all your concentration while starting an engine, don't be talking to people or looking around and starting at the same time....that's when you get whacked! As prevoiusly said, have someone hold the plane, you start it.
Old 10-18-2013, 03:38 PM
  #45  
Bozarth
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Someone please...tell me what the leather glove is for?

Kurt
Old 10-18-2013, 03:52 PM
  #46  
Jim Branaum
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Originally Posted by Bozarth
Someone please...tell me what the leather glove is for?

Kurt
There are 2 schools of thought. One is to keep the prop edges from cutting you and the other is to help finding your fingers...
Old 10-18-2013, 03:53 PM
  #47  
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Originally Posted by Bozarth
Someone please...tell me what the leather glove is for?

Kurt

I tell people it's to contain the severed finger(s) so that the dog doesn't get it ...lol

Seriously, I use one in case of a "whack".... it stings a little less.
Old 10-18-2013, 04:06 PM
  #48  
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I would have someone show me how to do it properly in person not someone over the internet. It is not hard to do, but it is a bit dangerous. A good welding glove and/or a big chicken stick designed for large motors is a necessity. Also having an electric starter is good to have around. Sometimes you just cannot get it started by hand flipping. A starter will do it in seconds. Often, it is hard to start the first time in the morning, and then after an electric start you can hand start for the rest of the day.

In my newest airplane, I added an electric engine starter mounted under the cowl that I operate from the radio. Overkill, but way cool and an air-start is going to be awesome.
Old 10-18-2013, 07:28 PM
  #49  
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[QUOTE=on_your_six;11641691
In my newest airplane, I added an electric engine starter mounted under the cowl that I operate from the radio. Overkill, but way cool and an air-start is going to be awesome.[/QUOTE]

I can see it now, that little starter running it's little tail off trying to get the engine restarted all the way to the scene of the crash!

I mean that in good humor so hope you take it that way. I always thought an onboard starter would be neat to have especially on a scale airplane.
Old 10-18-2013, 11:56 PM
  #50  
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Thanks all for the advice. I had some runs today and it starts in a very behaved manner. I put 4-5 drops of fuel down the carb throat and it fires after about three flips. I am having some fuel flow issues I need to sort out on my test stand, it but appears starting the engine will not be an issue. Still intimidating to watch that big prop spinning around even at idle!

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