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starter flu for gas eng

Old 01-21-2014, 05:50 AM
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handyman
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Question starter flu for gas eng

ok i am a bit new to gas ,,,,,,,,can you use a shot of starter flu to fire up a motor.........?
Old 01-21-2014, 08:58 AM
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w8ye
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It is not good for them as it contains no oil
Old 01-21-2014, 10:29 AM
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Rafael23cc
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Let me ask the obvious question.....

Why do you think you need starting fluid to start the engine?

Rafael
Old 01-21-2014, 10:40 AM
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av8tor1977
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Really bad for two stroke engines and not all that great for four strokes either. I believe they actually make some that has some oil in it for use on two strokes, but I still don't recommend it. It really isn't needed in any case.

AV8TOR
Old 01-21-2014, 10:42 AM
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I wouldn't use starter fluid as it ignites violently. It could lead to a nasty whack (or worse) on the fingers or hand. Unless it is extremely cold out, our engines should start just fine using normal starting techniques.

Many of these fluids do contain a lubricant and the cans are labeled as such. As pointed out by w8ye, many do not have a lube. I wouldn't think it an issue either way though as used properly, no liquid would enter the engine ... only vapor.
Old 01-21-2014, 11:05 AM
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flyinwalenda
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As already stated ...don't use it, If you feel you need to use starting fluid then something isn't correct with the engine/carb/.fuel set-up.
If the engine does not have a manual or automatic choke and you can see/touch the carb air input then you can plug it with your finger or a small ball on a stick while rotating the engine with the throttle open. When your finger gets wet the engine is primed.
If you can't get to the carb easily then you can get a small squeeze can or bottle with a long tip and fill it with some gas/oil mix. Drill a hole in the cowl where you can insert the tip in and squeeze some gas into the carb throat.
After priming the engine once or twice, it should fire-up and run. If not then again, there are other issues to deal with.

Last edited by flyinwalenda; 01-21-2014 at 11:07 AM.
Old 01-21-2014, 01:51 PM
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Many years ago when giant scale somewhat new, I watched a person use WD40 to get his Quarda going, worked like a charm. That was before chokes were standard equipment. I would use it if I thought I needed it, hey that's why they call it starting fluid.
Old 01-21-2014, 06:07 PM
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mrbigg
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Been using starting fluid for years. I don't see the lack of lubrication as being an issue. I'll give my engines a whiff, close the choke, and fire it up. Engine starts smoking right away as it usually does.
Old 01-21-2014, 06:19 PM
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Ronson lighter fluid works very well in extreme cold weather, guess it would also work anytime. As I recall it's Naptha........
Old 01-21-2014, 06:33 PM
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A guy at my field has a 1/3rd Stearman with a 7 Cylinder Gas Radial RCS or Moki. One day they were flipping and flipping and flipping that big Radial, nothing happened. I flipped it as well, I told them I'll be right back. I jumped into my truck and ran over to the closest AutoZone grabbed some Prestone Starting fluid, gave that sucker a shot in the general area of the intake and that sucker fired right up. I told him to keep the can and he uses it whenever the Radial gets stubborn....

I picked up some new gas motors recently and you can bet I'll have a can in my field box....












I

Last edited by Prop_Washer2; 01-28-2014 at 04:28 PM.
Old 01-21-2014, 06:50 PM
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Don't tell anyone, but, I have a can in my box as well.
Old 01-21-2014, 07:38 PM
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It doesn't take much ether to fire an engine off. If you're using enough to wash the oil off the cylinder walls, you're using way too much. But I do agree that you shouldn't need any unless something in the fuel or ignition system is amiss.
Old 01-21-2014, 08:21 PM
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Default Wd 40

The new WD 40 does not work if you have a old can its great R/L
Old 01-21-2014, 09:35 PM
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Originally Posted by RiverLarry View Post
The new WD 40 does not work if you have a old can its great R/L
the new one doesnt smell as good either..lol
Old 01-22-2014, 08:13 AM
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It's the easiest way to tell if you have a fuel related problem. I've used it for years. I wouldn't recommend it for new first time run engines however without putting in some oil.
As with many issues in these threads, use your own discretion.
Darrolair
Old 01-22-2014, 02:35 PM
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av8tor1977
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I've seen lots of engines damaged by using it. Usually what happens is there is some other problem, fuel or ignition related and the engine won't start. So a novice grabs a can of starting fluid, and instead of just giving it a bare whiff of ether, they hose it. That's when the piston and cylinder run completely dry of oil and get damaged, especially if the engine actually does start.

On four strokes, I've heard them detonate so hard that I was surprised the head(s) didn't blow off or the pistons break when someone hoses them down with starting fluid. All in all just not a good thing unless there's no other way, and I can't imagine that unless it is 30 below zero and you didn't have an engine pre-heater and you need to get your diesel started because your wife is in labor.....

AV8TOR

Last edited by av8tor1977; 01-22-2014 at 06:44 PM.
Old 01-25-2014, 08:46 AM
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Small engines that are low compression & have a short stroke are the type of engines that the starting fluid will for the most part will not harm. The bigger cubic inch engines that have high compression (& long stroke) are the ones that kick back....like pre ignition. I use it only on certain engines & it has never did any harm.
Old 01-25-2014, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Tony Hallo View Post
Many years ago when giant scale somewhat new, I watched a person use WD40 to get his Quarda going, worked like a charm. That was before chokes were standard equipment. I would use it if I thought I needed it, hey that's why they call it starting fluid.
I think they used to use propane for propellent.
Old 01-25-2014, 09:50 AM
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I used to use diesel fuel. It contains ether and a lubricant I dont know where to get anymore though.
Old 01-25-2014, 10:36 AM
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WD-40 used to burn; you could hold a lighter up and shoot a burst of it and it was like a flame thrower. Then they changed formulas or propellants, and it wouldn't burn. Then later, it would burn again. Don't know what the present state is with it.....

AV8TOR
Old 01-26-2014, 01:18 PM
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When I worked in a small engine repair shop we used WD-40. I have never had to use anything on a gas engine in any of my planes though. I did need a starter on one after I rebuilt a carb but after that it hand started.
Old 01-26-2014, 01:45 PM
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I repair/rebuild/modify, etc. lots of engines. Most of the time they will fire right off with virtually no problem, but every once in a while one will be "balky" and not want to run. Instead of having the patience to pull the plug out and check for flooding, etc., I too will usually just grab the electric starter and away they go. Then as you said, after that they easily hand start.

It is actually somewhat amazing when you think about it, as when hand starting they only get to go past the compression/ignition stroke one time. When using a pull starter for example like on a weekeater, chainsaw, etc., they are turned over rapidly multiple times. But ours still start with that one flip. Of course, most of the other equipment has magnetos that need to turn a bit fast to make a spark, but still, I have magneto equipped airplane engines that fire right off with a hand flip. I think the other factor is that we fine tune our engines to be exactly right, (hopefully), and a chain saw or weedeater may or may not be anywhere close in tune, have a good clean plug, good compression, etc.

AV8TOR

Last edited by av8tor1977; 01-26-2014 at 01:51 PM.
Old 01-27-2014, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by av8tor1977 View Post
I repair/rebuild/modify, etc. lots of engines. Most of the time they will fire right off with virtually no problem, but every once in a while one will be "balky" and not want to run. Instead of having the patience to pull the plug out and check for flooding, etc., I too will usually just grab the electric starter and away they go. Then as you said, after that they easily hand start.

It is actually somewhat amazing when you think about it, as when hand starting they only get to go past the compression/ignition stroke one time. When using a pull starter for example like on a weekeater, chainsaw, etc., they are turned over rapidly multiple times. But ours still start with that one flip. Of course, most of the other equipment has magnetos that need to turn a bit fast to make a spark, but still, I have magneto equipped airplane engines that fire right off with a hand flip. I think the other factor is that we fine tune our engines to be exactly right, (hopefully), and a chain saw or weedeater may or may not be anywhere close in tune, have a good clean plug, good compression, etc.

AV8TOR
We tune3d the chain saws and brush cutters about the same as a plane engine. High end first then the low end. Max RPM then lowered it a few hundred so they didn't run lean.
Only engine I have had that didn't hand start well is a G-62 with a mag. I tried every position of the prop and all I got was a sore arm and shoulder. I put on a C&H spring starter on it and then it fired the first time every time. No problems with any other engine but this one was in a crash and I did a carb repair, it could use a new carb but once fired it runs perfectly. I'm almost ready to start up a couple engines that haven't been fired in a couple years. If they draw gas right away there should be no problem, if not I will roll them over with a starter. Both have the newer alcohol proof diaphragms so they should be OK. They were both put away after a crash and the carbs were still wet. We'll see what happens real soon.
Old 01-27-2014, 03:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Gray Beard View Post
When I worked in a small engine repair shop we used WD-40. I have never had to use anything on a gas engine in any of my planes though. I did need a starter on one after I rebuilt a carb but after that it hand started.
When I seen this in action it was before chokes were fitted, had to buy them from Bennet. My first Q50 was choked with my finger. The plane was a Pogo if memory serves me right and using a finger wasn't convenient.
Old 01-27-2014, 06:20 PM
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av8tor1977
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I actually prefer "finger choking" when possible. On my cowled airplanes, which is most of them, I use the normal routine: crack open the throttle, choke and flip 'till it starts and then quits, then choke open and flip until it runs. But with my un-cowled engines, I just slowly turn the engine over with my finger choking the carb. When I feel my finger get wet, I stop. Then it is throttle just above idle, turn on the ignition, and they nearly always start with only one flip.

AV8TOR

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