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Old 08-18-2014, 01:07 PM
  #27276  
blw
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I'll admit up front this is off topic, but I can't find it anywhere else. Anybody know where that video is of the guy who has 5 or 6 big aircraft radials propped up in his backyard? He cranks them all up in the video. I may need this to show my wife that my measly hobbies are kinda reasonable one day. Plus, it's just a great video.
Old 08-18-2014, 01:14 PM
  #27277  
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BLW ,the last time I was in the hobbyshop in Mobile I heard some guy's talking about that same video I think you are talking about,must be pretty cool. P.S. HAVE BEEN ON THE GUS BUS SINCE THE PLANE LANDED(GOOD HIRE JAY!) W.E.!
Old 08-18-2014, 02:17 PM
  #27278  
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Snr Tele, yes to your last post, I have been messing around with 91's for a while and regret the day my mate conned me out of my last one. Bugger tempted me with a NIB YS 63. The common crankcases make my engine mounting easier so I am all for it. On the fuel thing I am currently using a 15% nitro 20% synthetic fuelfor both 2 stroke and 4 Stroke sports flying. It is a copy of the Byron fuel I used in Malaysia and saves on stuff being transported to the flying field.
Old Fart, it is interesting to see the discussion I started and good as well. When I talk to a newbie I give the following advice, smoke trails are good (oil is going through the engine so being lubricated and cooled, and it is some times easier to see a smoke trail at 2,000ft +) oil on the fuse is good, (it is going through the engine (and al the previous apply). And if one is tuning an engine a tacho is a must as is a variety of props. One last comment I am glad I don't pay those prices our american brethen have to. I am paying 1/2 to 2/3's the prices quoted on bulk buys. Mind you the components of fuel also appear to be cheaper as well. Guess we are still lucky country (sort off).
Old 08-18-2014, 03:54 PM
  #27279  
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I have been getting Wildcat 15% for $18 at Hobbytown. Picked up 2 gallons of SIG 15% for $15 a gallon at the fly in.
Old 08-18-2014, 05:52 PM
  #27280  
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Originally Posted by aggieman
HOBBSY what is tour favorite fuel mixtue for break in and every day running,(total oil%,nitro%castor and syn. or just syn.)
Am, my favorite fuel for everything is WildCat. For break in I use the Premium Extra at what ever nitro % I have on hand. Saitos are not picky when it comes to nitro % or glow plugs.
Old 08-19-2014, 05:27 AM
  #27281  
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Question, would anyone know the approximate year of a silver boxed Saito .90 radial. Thanks
Old 08-19-2014, 06:04 AM
  #27282  
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Now that I have my Saito back together, should I use blue loctite on the bolts?
Old 08-19-2014, 07:02 AM
  #27283  
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Not needed.
Old 08-19-2014, 07:18 AM
  #27284  
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Dave, my 72 and 82 backplates came with a white thread locker on the screws. The 72 needs it or they back out on the first tank of fuel. It was well tuned and balanced too. I used epoxy.
Old 08-19-2014, 09:14 AM
  #27285  
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Originally Posted by Cougar429
I've likely mentioned this before, but have been using Rich's Brew for years now, picking up enough for myself and friends every spring at the Toledo Show. If I get there early Friday morning still stock of 15% nitro 18% castor synth mix. A bit messier to clean up, but with cowled motors can guarantee at least some protection if cooling airflow is low, (such as sustained vertical or tumble maneuvers).
I have been using Rich's Brew also for a few years. I buy it at the Toledo Show also. 2 years ago I switched to their 20/20 mix for my 4-strokes, 20% nitro, 20% all-synthetic oil I love the feel of the warm oily exhaust on my hands during cold Michigan days!!! The engines run great too.

I have been running my Saito 91S (with a Turboheader muffler) on my Phoenix Extra330 a lot this summer. It really transformed the behavior of the plane compared to the 2-stroke 74 and 90 that I had in it previously. Top end power is about same, but the part throttle torque is wonderful. It is also so much quieter than the 2-strokes. The only drawback is having to use the more expensive 20/20 fuel instead of the ultra cheap 5% castor/synth fuel on my 2-strokes.

By the way, does anybody know how much performance difference you get from the 91 and the 100? I have been toying with the idea of moving the 91 to my Seagull Ultimate 46 and putting a 100 on the Phoenix Extra330 that is now running the 91. The specs say the 100 is only 1/2 oz heavier than the 91.

Last edited by hsukaria; 08-19-2014 at 01:38 PM.
Old 08-19-2014, 02:41 PM
  #27286  
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Originally Posted by blw
Dave, my 72 and 82 backplates came with a white thread locker on the screws. The 72 needs it or they back out on the first tank of fuel. It was well tuned and balanced too. I used epoxy.
Hi there. I think the thread locker is for the plastic backplate versions only . Cheers the pope
Old 08-19-2014, 04:01 PM
  #27287  
Hobbsy
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When I bought my two previous .72s I immediately placed a metal 2.5mm washer under each back plate screw and torqued them to 3 inch pounds. They never messed up. I had to grind one of them with a little flat on the edge.
Old 08-20-2014, 02:04 AM
  #27288  
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I'm beginning to think that maybe trevor (fnq) is right and the engines/manuals we get are a little different than america or europe tho for the life of me i can't think why saito would do that,if they do.Red is the only colour thread locker i've seen on any saito i own.My 82 engines had no thread locker on the backplate screws from new.The screws never back out and i've had no problems with the plastic backplates at all.

Acdc please don't locktite any of your engine bolts,they are hard to get out already.If the engine is already together you said ?

ps just came within a foot of giving the nextdoor neighbours tomcat a haircut and did'nt crash the electric chopper into the fence this time..yay!
Old 08-20-2014, 03:39 AM
  #27289  
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There are different "grades" of Loctite. They are not only graded for the bond strength, but for fastener size. There is even "WICKING GRADE" Loctite for pre-assembled fasteners.

I have used "242" (blue) for some pretty small fasteners W/O difficulty during removal.

In fact, Loctite can prevent corrosion in some applications making removal easier.

All that being said, I do not normally use Loctite on my Saitos

Last edited by SrTelemaster150; 08-20-2014 at 03:46 AM.
Old 08-20-2014, 04:35 AM
  #27290  
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OK, if I were to use it, it would only be the blue stuff, the red is permanent, bolt breaking, grade. It just felt like there was some sort of thread locker on them when I removed them, but didn't see any residue. My T-Clips 70 arrived yesterday, and its really light, so an FG11 will most likely pull this plane around with reserve. I had originally considered a 91, but I feel that would be overkill, frame breaking, power for it, and I was right. I prefer gas over glow due to being less expensive, easier to get, and So much easier to clean up after. I just don't like the chain saw sound of the 2 strokes so want to try out the 4 stroke version.
Old 08-20-2014, 05:39 AM
  #27291  
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As SrTelemaster stated, there are MANY grades of Loctite that pretty much cover any requirement. Although many are color coded, do not use that as the deciding factor. Go on their site and read through the specs.

Generally and in the case of softer materials, I would do as Hobbsy suggested and place a washer under the head of a cap screw. This spreads the loads and would often prevent the fastener from deforming or damaging the area around the hole. In this way you can tighten the fastener enough to prevent it coming loose.

As for Loctite in this app, I would generally avoid using anything other than LOW strength in aluminum as stronger can tear the threads out of the case or head when removing them cold, (I say this as most Loctites in this class soften under heat, a method we use to help remove difficult fasteners).

One trick that may seem counter intuitive is used when assembling full sized aircraft engines. By lubing the threads of the fastener before installation you can get a tighter and more consistent torque since a lot of it is not lost to friction between fastener and case or nut. It can also prevent corrosion of either the metal fastener, alloy case or both.

Forgot to mention that I too grieved over the loss of my 91, the first in my string of Saitos. Made up for it today by picking up another. Can't wait to find a use for it.

Last edited by Cougar429; 08-20-2014 at 06:23 AM.
Old 08-20-2014, 06:02 AM
  #27292  
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I want to join Club Saito please. I just got my first Saito a few months ago and I am loving it! It's an FG-21 and I've been running it on 100LL aviation fuel and Castrol TTS 2 stroke oil. I've got it in an R/C Guys Cessna 150 and it flys just like the real thing (My Dad owns a 1970 150 Aerobat).

Brian
Old 08-20-2014, 06:03 AM
  #27293  
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Originally Posted by Cougar429
One trick that may seem counter intuitive is used when assembling full sized aircraft engines. By lubing the threads of the fastener before installation you can get a tighter and more consistent torque since a lot of it is not lost to friction between fastener and case or nut. It can also prevent corrosion of either the metal fastener, alloy case or both.
Hi Cougar429
Would you use the engines normal lube oil or would ATF (automatic transmission fluid) be a good choice?

That is what I use as an after run oil and to pickle an engine for long term storage. BTW I have started using ATF on some of my shop tools to control rust. Just started in the last 2-4 months so I can' report anything. Bit I was having a problem with the column of my drill press and some cast iron tool work beds and tables rusting, and nothing else was working for me.

Ken
Old 08-20-2014, 06:26 AM
  #27294  
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I now have a use for the extra quarts of ATF I no longer have a use for.
Old 08-20-2014, 06:26 AM
  #27295  
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Ken, as I remember it, the long time recommendation has been to use a light machine oil, (whatever that is) on bolts you about to torque.
Old 08-20-2014, 06:58 AM
  #27296  
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Originally Posted by Hobbsy
Ken, as I remember it, the long time recommendation has been to use a light machine oil, (whatever that is) on bolts you about to torque.
Makes sense. I was just wondering if there was new recommendation. I think using ATF for after run is relatively new also. I use to use Marvel Mystery oil. But on long term it did fail me a time or two. I only last year discovered ATF so I can't report on it.

Our humidity here in southern Texas gets insane. Ocean just a few miles away, bay even closer (and it reaches way inland), plus lakes, ponds around the corner almost.

Ken
Old 08-20-2014, 07:15 AM
  #27297  
Hobbsy
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KEN, that is one reason I used Corrosion X for a long time, Sheldon's in California sold it as an ARO but it's real purpose was to protect electronic components in a salt air environment. We are surrounded by water here as well. The Potomac is 6 miles away and 9 miles across and we are surrounded by its backwaters. So far the NAPA Fogging Oil works.and is about 1/4 the cost of the CX.
Old 08-20-2014, 07:19 AM
  #27298  
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Other than Horizon, any other places to buy a Saito? I would like it this week though, and since they are local I can get it by Friday if I order today.
Old 08-20-2014, 07:44 AM
  #27299  
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Originally Posted by Hobbsy
When I bought my two previous .72s I immediately placed a metal 2.5mm washer under each back plate screw and torqued them to 3 inch pounds. They never messed up. I had to grind one of them with a little flat on the edge.
Everyone is assuming that Saito is using the Locktite brand and I don't think that would be the case. Anyway, my NIB 82 had a white compound on the plastic backplate screws.

That could be true about Saito only using a thread locker on plastic parts. Makes sense.

The first 72 backplates were the soft plastic ones that I suffered with along with W8YE's help, even though we learned a valuable lesson from that ordeal concerning deteriorating fuel tubing that would be good info later on. Saito then began shipping the 72's with the washers, and then the 'improved' plastic backplate with washers that was basically the same garbage, imo. Mine would deform quickly and the screws would vibrate out after a couple of minutes of running. The engine ran like a champ if it didn't ingest air at the manifold. I swabbed epoxy in the crankcase threads and that solved the problem permanently. I tested it by backing the screws out after a few runs and threading them back in. It just works better than any thread locker brand and I don't know why people pay for a tube of the other stuff. The screws stay tight, the backplate stays put, the manifold stays put, and the engine has a lot of power. I now have a new metal backplate to put on it.

Dave, those screws are too small to get an accurate torque. You may get your reading but it's probably not accurate. Size matters with tiny torques. I use a right handed tool calibrated 61 years for torquing small screws. Never failed me yet.

Speaking of tiny things, I replaced my optical drive in an iMac last week. If you've seen those you know how thin they are. I now believe in elves and leprechauns because those are the only creatures who could do this kind of work day in, day out.
Old 08-20-2014, 08:36 AM
  #27300  
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I am aware of Corrosion X. Just have not bought any yet. I had never thought of putting it in an engine or on my rust prone tool parts.
Dang I like that idea
Hobbsy.

Thanks

Ken

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