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JR Colt retro?

Old 04-26-2016, 12:19 PM
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jaymen
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Default JR Colt retro?

Four years ago, I attended the AMA show here in Pomona, and was a guest of the Nights of the Round Circle, a control line club. At their booth I displayed a Heathkit GD-47 transmitter, converted to 2.4GHz using a Fr-Sky DIY module and receiver. Hooked up to 5 small servos, it had the Tx output meter backlit using the LED on the binding board, and we left it on so everyone could come by and play with it.

During my turn to sit and man the booth, a bunch of guys, including some Japanese big wigs from JR Propo came over and spent quite some time playing with the radio and speaking in Japanese. One finally asked me a few technical questions and I showed him the fail-safe feature, and explained the radio system was converted to 2.4 GHz, but used the original encoder and Bonner joysticks. This lead to some more unintelligible conversation between the Japanese and then they bid me farewell.

Well, now we see the JR Colt Retro radio, in the very same "Prince Albert" case with krinkle blue paint, just like the GD-47 I converted. Can't those guys come up with their own thing? In my personal opinion, the Colt logo on the front is out of place and a little odd looking as well. The JR plastic joysticks are way too modern to qualify the radio with a retro look. I like the features, but would be much happier with and old radio that had a Phil G Arduino, or Ace Micro-Pro 8000 stuffed inside.
The real zinger however is the cost, it's just too high for the average Joe, plus it had better look much more retro for that kind of money. Now, if they had made the case from an attractively colored anodized aluminum, and used all metal quality open gimbal assemblies, and put the LCD screen and switches under a panel on the back, or bottom, it would look retro yet have all the goodies.

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Old 04-27-2016, 05:00 AM
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Agreed, Particularly on price and the plastic sticks. LCD panel should be placed on the bottom of the case, Metal stick assembles are a must for the era they are shooting for. Just a lot of misses here ..
Old 04-27-2016, 07:36 AM
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Already done. Proline with a Microstar conversion at a fraction of what JR thinks you should spend for a "retro" looking radio.
Old 04-28-2016, 06:50 AM
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What did it cost to have it converted to 2.4, what receiver is used with the conversion? I have a Kraft series 80 I have considered modifying but though it might be cost prohibitive.
Old 04-28-2016, 10:50 AM
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Conversion costs depend on the radio, and the brand of 2.4 GHz module and receiver you want to use. Corona, FrSky and Orange equipment runs under $70.00 for a module, receiver, and switch harness, plus you need 4 servos and a 4 cell NiCad if gas powered.

The labor is free if you do it yourself, but most guys charge between $100 to $200 for the conversion labor, depending again on the transmitter, as some of the earlier makes need more extensive modification.
Old 04-28-2016, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by jaymen View Post
Conversion costs depend on the radio, and the brand of 2.4 GHz module and receiver you want to use. Corona, FrSky and Orange equipment runs under $70.00 for a module, receiver, and switch harness, plus you need 4 servos and a 4 cell NiCad if gas powered.

The labor is free if you do it yourself, but most guys charge between $100 to $200 for the conversion labor, depending again on the transmitter, as some of the earlier makes need more extensive modification.
Is there a conversion kit for the FAAST system? All my other radios are Futaba so it would be nice to be able to interchange them.
Old 05-02-2016, 01:41 PM
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When you do conversions, it is the Tx module brand that determines compatibility. In your case, you would buy a Futaba FAAST module and then it would work with all your FAAST receivers. There are some aftermarket brands of FAAST Tx modules available on Hobby King site.
Old 05-02-2016, 01:53 PM
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Originally Posted by jaymen View Post
When you do conversions, it is the Tx module brand that determines compatibility. In your case, you would buy a Futaba FAAST module and then it would work with all your FAAST receivers. There are some aftermarket brands of FAAST Tx modules available on Hobby King site.
I have done some looking but haven't found what I need for a Kraft series 80.
Old 05-05-2016, 10:11 AM
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You mentioned Futaba FAAST, but now you mentioned a Kraft series 80. There are no spread spectrum modules that will plug into Krafts. You need to do some modification to your Kraft board and wire it to a module of the type spread spectrum you desire.

The two basic forms of spread spectrum are dual signal (DSSS) frequency hopping (FHSS). Each company uses their own version of these schemes, with their own proprietary code so you typically cannot mix different brands of receivers with modules due to that. However, OrangeRX does offer some DSM, DSM2, and DSMX Spektrum compatible modules and receivers.

Your best bet with the Kraft would be to use a FrSky, Corona, or Orange DIY conversion module. I believe Orange and Corona offer the module and receiver as a package deal. I myself have no experience using Orange, but can tell you the Corona and FrSky both work very well.
Old 05-07-2016, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by jaymen View Post
Four years ago, I attended the AMA show here in Pomona, and was a guest of the Nights of the Round Circle, a control line club. At their booth I displayed a Heathkit GD-47 transmitter, converted to 2.4GHz using a Fr-Sky DIY module and receiver. Hooked up to 5 small servos, it had the Tx output meter backlit using the LED on the binding board, and we left it on so everyone could come by and play with it.

During my turn to sit and man the booth, a bunch of guys, including some Japanese big wigs from JR Propo came over and spent quite some time playing with the radio and speaking in Japanese. One finally asked me a few technical questions and I showed him the fail-safe feature, and explained the radio system was converted to 2.4 GHz, but used the original encoder and Bonner joysticks. This lead to some more unintelligible conversation between the Japanese and then they bid me farewell.

Well, now we see the JR Colt Retro radio, in the very same "Prince Albert" case with krinkle blue paint, just like the GD-47 I converted. Can't those guys come up with their own thing? In my personal opinion, the Colt logo on the front is out of place and a little odd looking as well. The JR plastic joysticks are way too modern to qualify the radio with a retro look. I like the features, but would be much happier with and old radio that had a Phil G Arduino, or Ace Micro-Pro 8000 stuffed inside.
The real zinger however is the cost, it's just too high for the average Joe, plus it had better look much more retro for that kind of money. Now, if they had made the case from an attractively colored anodized aluminum, and used all metal quality open gimbal assemblies, and put the LCD screen and switches under a panel on the back, or bottom, it would look retro yet have all the goodies.
I agree with your comment on the price of the transmitter. It is ridiculously high considering what they are offering you. As it is a limited offering I guess they are hoping for enough people to buy their limited production item and then close shop and move on to the next impromptu item for the 'discerning collector'.
Old 05-25-2016, 03:47 PM
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Here is the real McCoy,
a survivor.



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Old 05-26-2016, 06:49 AM
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Originally Posted by jaymen View Post
Here is the real McCoy,
a survivor.



A true classic!

I bought on close out the 2 stick 3 channel model on page 116 (see thr 5channel on the previous page) of this catalog in 1972 or 73. $135 got the set with a bonus 3rd servo. I built it for a high school electronics class and got an A! Another student built the new single stick 3 channel radio that had just come out. I used the devil out of it was my only radio until I bought a second hand Kraft 5 channel in 1975 or 76. Check out those servo prices! The Heathkit version of the KPS-9 or KPS-10 servos are $21.50 each and you sill had to assemble them. The receiver was the new "miniature" radio.

http://www.americanradiohistory.com/...thkit-1971.pdf

Last edited by FlyerInOKC; 05-26-2016 at 06:54 AM.
Old 05-26-2016, 07:07 AM
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Here are a few photos I found the transmitter on Ebay for $29.00 but no takers.
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