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Is "Wood Glue" dead?

Old 07-26-2009, 03:20 PM
  #76  
RC-Archer
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Default RE: Is

Funny that you brought this up. I was just reading a build thread by a respected model builder/designer and he recommended using Titebond instead of CA to build up the balsa wing. This guy designs leading edge composite airplanes so if he says Titebond is better than CA, I'm going to go with that. I'm starting a new project right now, (84" Powerhouse) so instead of buying a big bottle of CA, I bought a big bottle of Gorilla Wood Glue. Same stuff as Titebond II except it dries clear instead of yellow.

I have nothing against CA and I have started substituting Polyurethane glues for epoxy. The poly glues is lighter and more flexible than epoxy but it takes a couple hours to kick off. I use epoxy if I need to build up a structural joint.
Old 07-27-2009, 10:30 AM
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ORIGINAL: chuck l

I've read through this thread and noticed that some of you tack parts together with CA and followup with Titebond or similiar putting a fillet around the joint. Does the fillet of Titebond really add much strength? Doesn't the glue have to be in the wood joint itself to be most effective?

Chuck
If you have a properly-made glue joint, then adding a fillet of glue to any joint only adds weight. If your glue joint needs additional support, you're better-off adding a fillet of glass cloth, micro-balloons, or wood. Tacking with CA and then adding a fillet of white glue (or other) is claimed to be good because the parts are firmly held in place while the other glue cures. However, you will not get good penetration into the joint with the slower-drying glue, and the areas with CA will not allow other glues into them. In fact, it will spread through the wood and prevent good adhesion even where it's not bonding across the joint.

Old 07-27-2009, 10:58 AM
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Default RE: Is

That must not hold true with the ARF's that your company distributes. I often see them with what appears to be hot melt glue placed everywhere but at the glue joint.

Bill, Waco Brother #1
Old 07-27-2009, 07:54 PM
  #79  
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Whenever I used CA I ended up with a headache that would last for days. No such problem with Elmers or Titebond. I surely miss Pica Glu-it - it sanded so nicely after it dried!
Old 07-28-2009, 11:23 AM
  #80  
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ORIGINAL: Stickbuilder

That must not hold true with the ARF's that your company distributes. I often see them with what appears to be hot melt glue placed everywhere but at the glue joint.

Bill, Waco Brother #1
"Hot melt" glue is NEVER used. It's a type of 2-part adhesive that comes out of a gun-type applicator. The cloudy look makes people think it's a hot glue, but it's more closely-related to epoxy. It is a flexible adhesive, not a brittle one. Likely, the parts are dry-fitted in a jig and then the glue is applied. For assembly-line work, I guess that's how they do it. I have never been told the exact manner of assembly, but have been advised that the glue is most certainly NOT hot-melt.

Likely, a proper, double-glued joint like you're supposed to do would be stronger, but it would also multiply the building time and cause a very significant price increase.



Old 07-28-2009, 01:58 PM
  #81  
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Thanks for a very interesting read and great trip back into the past! I, too, still use Ambroid for model building...especially good for planking. I used LOTS of CA over the years and now have to wear an Industrial type mask with appropriate filters if I want to continue using CA. Result: Rarely do I use the CA now that I have the mask...I switched back to using Titebond wood glues for most of the building. Titebond Regular (red label) and Titebond III (green label) sand MUCH better than Titebond II (blue label). I apply the Titebond sparingly and wipe the excess glue as soon as I notice it...makes the sanding a lot easier. CA will always have its use in the shop but by and large Ambroid and wood glue get used much more when building my model aircraft.

Soft landings.

Joe

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