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Vintage Radio Equip

Old 07-11-2003, 01:23 AM
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Gonnacrash
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

Have recently gotten my hands on some "tube" rx. I would like to know what voltage it takes to power them. Then I assume the two exit terminals go to a relay, that operates the rubber band powered escapement .. Dig into those cob webs and tell me how to hook these up to make them operational. Thanks guys/gals. Don-Basehor,Ks
Old 07-11-2003, 12:27 PM
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CoosBayLumber
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

Depends upon how modern the receiver was, as to what voltage it required. It moreover depends upon manufacturer and their specifications.

Most of the standard large plug-in types used 45 volts and 3 volts to power the receiver and another 3 volt supply for the escapement.

Towards the early 1960's with the non-removable hard tube types, smaller packaging, this went to 22 1/2 volts, usinga photo-flash battery, then either 1.5 or 3 volts for fillament, and the standard 3 volts for the escapement.


Wm.
Old 07-12-2003, 01:51 AM
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Gonnacrash
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

Fffffoooorrrty five volts ... like in 30 batteries ??? Woahhhhhh.. I remember when I was 5-6 and this fellow flew them.. His name was Byron not Sampson !!! Just kidding Coos.. Thats a lot of weight... I have some of the soft and hard type rx's.. Thanks for the info... Don-Basehor,Ks.
Old 07-12-2003, 02:06 AM
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big max 1935
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

You never wanted your wife to hand launch your plane back then , her arms would get so strong she could break your ribs every time she hugged you! Ah, the good old days! MAX H.
Old 07-12-2003, 01:43 PM
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CoosBayLumber
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

No...

This is a VINTAGE section and you have to refer back to those VINTAGE notes, and therefor you have to use VINTAGE terminology and thought line. You can't use the terms (nor thought lines) of an 18 year old air-head. Old model aircraft engines used to run on 6-8000 volts at the spark plug, but you didn't carry that in a battery of cells either.

I used the 22.5 volt batteries, as they were about the only thing available in my neighborhood at the time. These were placed in series to obtain the correct voltage. The most popular was the black, white and red striped Burgess brand number K15. This BATTERY, not a cell as it is composed of numerous cells, was about 7/8" by 1.25" by 2" and weighed about 2 Oz. each and was referred to as the B battery supply. These cost about $2 each then and had to be replaced, as in "throw away" when depleted, after about ten hours of use. The A battery supply was composed of one or two cells, usually AA size and provided filament power for the tube.

Tube transmitters often ran on three volts A supply and 67 to 135 volts B supply.

I would suggest that in order to get a visual or hands on knowledge, you drive to the older part of downtown, and visit the old, dusty, BO smelling television repair shop. Ask that silver haired senior citizen who hasn't shaved in a week, that you want to see what a common old model airplane B battery of the 1950's looks like. They are still used for testing of low numbered tubes in television sets.

Then, if you really want a lesson, as they don't come with wires nor connectors, ask him how to hook it into the circuit. He will probably grin with the few remaining teeth, and reach under the counter for a soldering gun and ask if you know how to use one.

Wm.
Old 07-12-2003, 03:53 PM
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Gonnacrash
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

OK Coos, thanks for the info ! I know a couple of those silver haired coots that I can make some inquires from. One of them, I grew up with but have not visited with in many years. Will look him up. Again THANKS. Don-Basehor,Ks
Old 07-12-2003, 06:10 PM
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jessiej
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

As a Boy Scout project in the early 50s I built a 2 tube AM radio which used a 90 volt battery- a Burgess, along with some other batterys, I don't remember what kind. I remember that I climbed Waaaay up a huge old oak to run an antenna. I also rember the thing had quite a bite if you touched the wrong dohickey.
Old 07-13-2003, 05:01 PM
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Gonnacrash
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

My ole crystal set with the headphones had the antenna out of my bedroom to the top of a huge tree.. lightning had been mentioned by dad but I escaped that... Don-Basehor, Ks. sorry bit off the subject
Old 07-23-2003, 01:28 AM
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CLovell
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Default Old RX's

Gonnacrash,

If you can post a reasonable picture of one or more of your RX's, I might be able to identify it... and with any luck, find a schematic and/or hook up info for it. I'm not one of those old-timers that used to fly them (I did start on pulse r/o though), but I am into older gear and have a bunch of info stashed here and there. Let me know if I can help.

Craig Lovell
Old 07-23-2003, 01:53 PM
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R. Smith
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Default Vintage Radio Equip

The RX hi-voltage batteries were used in hearing aid's as were most of the subminature thyratron and hard tubes.

I remember opening up a 45 volt Burgess battery and being very impressed with the manner in which the multiple cells were stacked in order that the voltage could be delivered to the snap terminals.

Strangely enough the B batteries were very reliable I can never remember one failing. Not so with the rest of the components.

Richard Smith

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