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Sig Citabria Build

Old 05-21-2020, 12:00 PM
  #226  
acdii
 
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I take it the wood space between the two mounts is to attach one to the other? If so, what if you put that inside the other mount instead of outside it? Looks like that will give you the distance needed.
Old 05-21-2020, 02:15 PM
  #227  
Starwolf2
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Originally Posted by acdii View Post
I take it the wood space between the two mounts is to attach one to the other? If so, what if you put that inside the other mount instead of outside it? Looks like that will give you the distance needed.
The wood is actually 3 pieces of plywood epoxied together. The two outermost are there to hide the socket head screws. Without them, I would not be able to put the metal and wood motor mount plates back to back. I could potentially modify it by using flat head screws instead of the socket head screws. I have attached a revised drawing below.


Old 05-22-2020, 04:14 PM
  #228  
Starwolf2
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Success!!! Acdii, thanks for your suggestion! I threw away the mounts I had before and created a new system. There are now 2 pieces of plywood behind the motor mount. They are attached to the motor mount by 4 flat head 4-40 screws. I had to use a drill press to counter sink the holes for these screws in the motor mount. Then, I added two pieces of plywood above the motor mount to serve as spacers. This was then bolted to the metal motor mount. I had to take it apart a few times because the motor was not spinning freely. I opened up the hole in the center of the plywood and in the center of the motor mount itself. This was sufficient to let the motor turn freely.

As an aside, I think the electric motor is really cool. The fact that the motor housing itself turns reminds me of old rotary engines that were used in WWI era planes.



Countersunk holes in motor mount

Plywood mount with spacers attached.

Mount attached to the airplane. I had to drill the hole in the center of the plywood with a larger drill bit and I had to bevel the metal bracket and flat head screw to make more room for the motor shaft to spin freely.

View of completed installation.

View of completed installation.

View of completed installation. I better tighten those bolts!

Final diagram.

Blurry photo showing that there is no gap between the fuselage and cowl.

View from the front.
Old 05-23-2020, 07:07 AM
  #229  
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There you go, thats what I had in mind, make a plywood sammich.
Old 05-27-2020, 06:12 AM
  #230  
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Acdii, how did you install the aluminum bracket for the struts on the fuselage?
Old 05-27-2020, 06:20 AM
  #231  
acdii
 
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I didn't yet. Haven't gotten that far. If they are like the Cub I built where they come out of the fuse, then I will glue a stick of plywood down and attach them to that. The plywood goes across the fuse, and with the strut brackets secured to it, the stresses are pulling against each other, so it works quite well. I use 1/8 6 ply.
Old 05-27-2020, 10:09 AM
  #232  
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I am starting to think of putting a hatch in the front of the fuselage to allow battery access between flights. I have never built a hatch and am putting a bit of thought into how to do it. I have seen several pictures of completed hatches, some even in Citabrias, however, I have not seen a step-by-step illustration of how to build one. I have a couple of concerns. One, how big should the hatch be? Two, will the installation of a hatch weaken the fuselage?

As a test, I made some indentations in two pieces of balsa to fit the shape of the hinges. I think I could follow a similar process in the side of the fuselage. With the hinges inset, I could epoxy them in place. This would allow the hinge to be flush with the surface of the fuselage. Thus, the Monokote would hide the surface of the hinge.

I plan to use earth magnets to close the hatch.

Side of the fuselage for door placement.

Hinge and practice cut-out.

Hinge lying in cut-out.


Old 05-28-2020, 03:56 PM
  #233  
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I drilled holes in the firewall for tie-downs to hold the ESC in place and also opened a larger hole for the ESC wires.

I drew a pattern for a hatch door, but wanted to sleep on it before actually cutting into the fuselage.

Holes for the zip ties and ESC wires.

ESC in place!

A potential door drawn out. The door is in the flat portions of the fuselage. Do I really want to cut this out????

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