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Painting a real boat

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Painting a real boat

Old 04-29-2007, 05:34 PM
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Flabum
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Default Painting a real boat

I have a 16' boat to paint and planning on using Awlcraft 2000 on it. I need some advice.

I have painted using acrylic enamel, clear/base and some urethanes, so spraying is easy for me. This is a marine paint that uses Awlgrip 545 as a sealer and Awlgrip High Build or Ultra Build for surfaces that need small imperfections hidden. I have the boat all filled with a water tight filler and glazing compound, but still needs the high build or ultra build.

The question being is this: I was told that I could mix the High Build or Ultra Build with the 545 to save time and make sanding easier. Is this true? Between the High Build and Ultra Build, which is easier to sand?

I also do not have a good place to spray, my boss will only let me do one spray, so will roll the primer and spray the topcoat. Any tips on rolling the primer and High Build would be appreciated too.
Old 05-24-2007, 07:35 AM
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capn gary
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Default RE: Painting a real boat

Flatbum,

Awlgrip 2000 doesn't like to be rolled and tipped. I found that out the hard way when I repainted the radar arch on the boss's 56 foot sailboat. It orangepeeled badly. THe only good news is that it's like laquer. After it's cured completely, it can be sanded and buffed out.

As to mixing high build fillers with 545, I've never tried it, but my guess is that it wouldn't work. One of the major catches with the linear polyurethanes is that they are fairly critical to amounts in the mixture, etc. Throwing in microballoons or something probably wouldn't work at all. That's just a guess, but it's probably a pretty good one.

If this is your own boat, you might want to think about using Sterling paint. THey have a good website explaining everything, and their paint is designed with the do-it-yourself crowd in mind. It rolls and tips nicely, is cheaper, and seems to be as durable as Awlgrip. (I put the stuff on a dinghy that gets beat up and sits in the sun. It still looks okay after three years.)

Good luck...

gary
Old 05-24-2007, 08:51 PM
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Default RE: Painting a real boat

Ok guys!! Why dont you use automotive paint??!!! If you know how to use them,then stick to them,instead of getting paint that you dont know much about?! Or other wise your heading for troubles!![X(] Like paint that might not dry wright or hight build primers that wont dry wright/sand it and it rolls into a ball on your sand paper!![X(] I'd painted six boats with automotive paints with no proublems and they held up very well maybe better.[8D]
Old 05-25-2007, 12:04 AM
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Default RE: Painting a real boat

Gary,

Thanks for the reply, I went ahead and did it the long way of 545, sand, then high build, sand, then 545, sand then the Awlcraft 2000 topcoat. Boy is she sweet! Thing is two guys where I work were telling me to mix the 545 and high build together to make it a one step process. One guy is a spiteful POS who is very jealous of my position there and of how much I make. The second guy is his little anal appendage. I have been doing fiberglass and gel coat work for 25 years and have that down to a science. I have painted a thousand engines using primer and acrylic enamel and Imron. All the boat repairs I have done were repaired using gel coat and very few were with paint. Some of my repairs includes rebuilding over 10 feet of the side of a 65 Sea Ray, 8 feet of the entire front bow of a 38 Scarab and many other large holes and sever structural work. Not to mention the mechanical expertise I have aquired.


MissHydro:

We don't use automotive paint down here on boats because it simply will not hold up in the harsh saltwater enviroment. Automotive paints will last maybe five years, but the paint I used will last at least 15 - 20 years. If we were to substitute the marine quality paint, we would use aircraft paint. The paint that was on this boat was 15 years old and still looked great, just scratched up The paint was Awlgrip. I simply don't understand people who want to use automotive stuff in boats, it's simply foolish to use something that was not manufactured for marine use. I make a lot of money on those people when they bring me their boats repaired with automotive parts........ pay me now or pay me a lot more later
Old 05-25-2007, 07:46 AM
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Default RE: Painting a real boat

Imorons By Dupont would take that type of harsh inviroment.That stuff they use on semi's and bullit proff,they go threw some tuff invirments too not salt all the time,but that alot of rock hits 24-7.
Old 05-25-2007, 08:01 PM
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Default RE: Painting a real boat


ORIGINAL: misshydro

Imorons By Dupont would take that type of harsh inviroment.That stuff they use on semi's and bullit proff,they go threw some tuff invirments too not salt all the time,but that alot of rock hits 24-7.

Imrons are very durable, but when they get hit hard enough they chip big time. Awlgrip Awlcraft 2000 is more pliable and less prone to chips.
Old 05-28-2007, 09:45 AM
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capn gary
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Default RE: Painting a real boat

I agree. We all used to use Imron on boats--when it was the state-of-the-art linear polyurethane paint. It lasts about five years if you keep a good coat of wax on it. (Especially down in So. Florida where the sun is just brutal.)

Awlgrip 2000 (or more properly Awlcraft) is the latest high-tech marine paint. The old Awlgrip has been around for quite a while, and I've seen several boats that were painted ten years ago that still look good. Imron won't last that long unless the boat is in a covered slip or covered.

gary

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