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Degrees to inches or mm

Old 11-07-2004, 12:42 PM
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Default Degrees to inches or mm

Hi All, The instructions for my 40 size Cub call for the control surface movement in degrees. How do I convert degrees to inches or millimeters ? I don't have anything with degrees on it.

Elevator 15 degrees up/down
Rudder 20 degrees left/right
Ailerons 12.5 degrees up/down

Thanks for the help
Jim
Old 11-07-2004, 01:37 PM
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Default RE: Degrees to inches or mm

Welcome aboard, jbfoster.

You will need a scientific calculator (or a book of sine functions) and a measuring stick.

With the measuring stick, measure the control surface from hinge point to trailing edge.

With the calculator, punch in the deflection in degrees, and press the "sin" button.

Now multiply the control surface measurement by the sine of the angle, to get the deflection (in the same units you measured, mm or inch or whatever.)

Good luck,
Dave Olson

ORIGINAL: jbfoster

Hi All, The instructions for my 40 size Cub call for the control surface movement in degrees. How do I convert degrees to inches or millimeters ? I don't have anything with degrees on it.

Elevator 15 degrees up/down
Rudder 20 degrees left/right
Ailerons 12.5 degrees up/down

Thanks for the help
Jim
Old 11-07-2004, 03:01 PM
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Default RE: Degrees to inches or mm

Let's use your rudder as an example. Measure it at the widest point. Say this dimension is 3". Multiply by two to give you the diameter if the rudder could move in a full circle. (6"} Multiply this times pi (3.14). Divide the answer ( 18.84) by 360 and you have the lenght of 1 degree. ( .052"} This times 20 is 1.04" throw for the rudder. You will be measuring a chord and not an arc, but it's plenty close enough. Jim, if you post the width of you control surfaces at the widest point, I'll do the math. I have my handy-dandy calculator standy by.

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