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UV cured paints; Fuel Proof?

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UV cured paints; Fuel Proof?

Old 08-04-2015, 08:18 AM
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GoNavy
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Default UV cured paints; Fuel Proof?

Does anyone know if there is a UV cured paint/clear coat which is fuel proof?

Browsing the web I see comments to the effect that UV cured paints have high resistance to chemicals and abrasion...and cautions that the paints are hard to remove.

Sounds a bit like an epoxy, but the UV cured paints are one part, cure rapidly, and you can save what you don't use.

Has anyone used UV cured paints, especially, on their rc airplane?
Old 08-05-2015, 05:36 AM
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jester_s1
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I don't know of anyone who has, but it sounds promising. Your best bet would be to choose a specific product and email the manufacturer. Ask if their paint will stand up to methanol and nitromethane and also explain that hot, oily exhaust residue will get on it too. While you're at it, ask about compatibility with other paints such as a latex or Krylon color coat with their clear coat. Most of the high tech paints on the market today require their products from the base material all the way through the top coat to adhere properly. We've come a long way from the days of basic enamel that could go onto nearly anything.
Old 08-05-2015, 06:32 AM
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GoNavy
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I spoke to a representative of one manufacturer; He didn't know about resistance to nitromethane, but expressed concern about the practicality of uv lighting for diy-ers, the cost and technique. Another manufacturer has not replied to an email.

One essay compared the results of abrasion and chemical testing to three different uv cured paints, including resistance to ethanol. One paint was 100% resistant: epoxy acrylate.

I find many comments to the effect that uv cured paints are very difficult to remove because they cannot be dissolved by chemical solvents which will soften other paints.

Apparently the paints cure by "photo activators" in the resin. These respond to certain uv light of certain wave lengths. Subject the paint to the necessary light for two minutes and it's cured. One summarized it this way: the "catalyst" (photo activators) is in the paint, and the light starts the chemical process.

It appears that this technology is making inroads in automotive refinishing work, particularly for smaller repairs which can be done quickly and much more economically that with other techniques.

It also appears that there are a wide variety of uv light sources, from special mercury vapor lamps to leds. The curing lamps as they are called can be mounted or hand held. Prices range from the thousands to the hundreds. Protective glasses and other safeguards (long sleeve shirt, gloves, etc) are necessary to prevent unwanted uv light exposure to the painter.

One site pointed out this wrinkle: Primers are opaque, and not all of it cures. Fortunately, it is the "underside" that cures, and the outer uncured portion is removed with a cloth and a cleaner.

Yes, compatability will have to be investigated... toxic hazards too.

But I think it is worth looking into. I want to avoid isocyanates which are in every polyurethane product according to a 3M article.
I have had a friend paint two part epoxy for me, and it looked great, but he was a very experienced painter.

These paints seem attractive because of the fast cure time (settling dust has a much smaller window of time), no two part mixing, and the "no waste" factor (if stored in the dark).

The manufacturer's rep I spoke to mentioned cost: Perhaps $100 per gallon. That seems more than competitive to some of the products rc-ers use now.
Old 08-05-2015, 06:24 PM
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jester_s1
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Those lights sound like a lot of expense to go to. But if there is a clear coat that works like that that could go over latex or some of the other easy to use paints I could definitely see the value to the hobby if we could play nice with some auto painters and have them shoot it onto a plane while they are in the process of spraying a car.
Old 08-06-2015, 05:02 AM
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Paint a sample and test it. I was told once that if you wipe a acetone soaked rag across a sample with no effect it's fuel proof
Old 08-06-2015, 05:18 PM
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I have used acetone to spot clean planes I used Klass Kote on, both color and clear without the KK getting pulled off.
As a kid growing up in Washington State most people had what we called sun lamps. I'm not sure but I think those were UV lights?? May still be able to get them if they are and could be a cheaper way to go???
Klass Kote clear can be sprayed over most any paint you use. Two part epoxy and bullet proof. My only problem with it is paying for it but a little will go a long way!!

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