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Old 10-12-2003, 09:55 AM
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sugarfoot
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Default tools

I am having a problem with phillips screwdrivers. I am using the same screwdrivers that I use for everyday problems like on cars, lawn mowers, etc.
The problem? Each time that I use these tools on my plane engines or mufflers, I end up destroying the heads of the screws. Is there special phillips screwdrivers that fit these tiny little heads available that any of you know of? I would appreciate any suggestions. Thank you.
Old 10-12-2003, 01:42 PM
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GalenB
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Default RE: tools

This is why most don't use phillips head screws in their model aircraft. Cap head screws are the best solution for solving this problem. Check out www.microfasteners.com

http://www.microfasteners.com/catalo...cts/SSCSCA.cfm for SAE and
http://www.microfasteners.com/catalo...cts/METSCM.cfm for metric
Old 10-12-2003, 06:23 PM
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Default RE: tools

The screws are generally JIS (Japanese Industial Standard) screws and most phillips screw drivers do not have the right tip. If you get a good set of screwdrivers from WIHA or HOZAN they will work much better and you won't be mucking up the heads. I know Heliproz sells the HOZAN set for a reasonalble price and WIHA is available at most electronic and hobby shops. As a matter of fact the last WIHA set I bought, I got from the Craftsman section at Sears.
Old 10-12-2003, 07:35 PM
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sugarfoot
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Default RE: tools

Thanks for the help guys. I'll try and get some of those screwdrivers from WIHA or HOZAN.
I know those cap screws are the best way to go. However, the engines and mufflers that I had problems with had already had those phillip head screws installed on them. Thanks again for your input. It sure does help me out.
Old 01-03-2004, 04:28 PM
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Rosster6028
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Default RE: tools

The root of your problem is there are two standards in play. Phillips, the ANSI standard is what 99% of tool vendors cater to. Including Wiha, everyone has a variation on this theme. JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) is just different enough to confound the ANSI standard. The main difference is that the tooling used to make the fasteners is deeper, and sharper, providing for a deeper and steeper point. This provides more surface area for the tool to contact the fastener, thereby providing for greater torque. Due to failures in the Phillips design, is it any wonder that Allen and Torx came along?

JIS Screwdrivers by Moody Tools will solve your problem. I sell the drivers individually, or as a set. $ 15.00 including shipping is for a set of four to completely cover any size you will encounter in helicopters, airplanes and cars in this hobby.

I've been selling them for years to fellow club members, hobby shops and at swap meets here in Michigan. It's a secret that is catching on. www.moodytools.com is a website - but you can't buy them there.

Drop me a line if you are interested. I'll send them and you can pay me later, via paypal, check, etc. if you like what you see.

Regards,

Ross
Old 01-03-2004, 11:02 PM
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spokman
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Default RE: tools

Part of your problem is cheap screw drivers. The tips deform rapidly on them and then they strip screws. I use cheaper ones but replace them often. Get ones that have nicer looking tips versus the cheap chrome looking tips. They will work better.
Old 01-04-2004, 12:10 AM
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shenion
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Default RE: tools

Well, the Phillips head was designed to strip the head. It was designed for automated assembly so the driver would pop out when desired torque was achieved. Really only used once. Not removed and reinstalled.

Here's a history: [link=http://inventors.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a3%5F290b.html]History of Phillips screw.[/link]

I find if I file the tip of a regular Phillips driver it will filt the Jap screws better (it sits deeper in the head.) The Jap screws have a slightly larger slot, fling the head gets the thicker part of the driver in the head.

If I have a real tight screw, I get the tolls out that came with my Jap bike

It is funny, smaller OS engines come with cap screws everywhere except on the muffler. So, the only screws that are repeatedly removed are Phillips and the ones that are never removed (normally) are cap screws. Who's bright idea was that.

Invest in some allen head cap screws. That is alll I use.
Old 01-04-2004, 07:37 AM
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Default RE: tools

A lot of people don't realize that there are two different types of "X" head screws... There are "Phillips", and "Reed and Prince". Phillips has a flat spot at the tip, while Reed and Prince has a point, and a slightly different angle.
Old 01-04-2004, 04:43 PM
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Default RE: tools

The reason OS puts JIS screws on their mufflers is because the muffler is soft aluminum. Very easy to strip so watch it if you use cap head bolts.
Old 01-04-2004, 05:48 PM
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Default RE: tools

Here's my $0.02.

Always try a screwdriver tip that seems too big for the job. Drop it in the screw and use light finger pressure to try and rotate it back and forth. If it's loose, go to a larger tip.

Little mini-screwdrivers are not what you are looking for.

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