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"Bush" Flying

Old 06-07-2006, 02:45 AM
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N46203
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Default "Bush" Flying

How many of you fly from rough/short fields? Fields that require steep approaches and rough landings? What kind of modifications do you make to your planes to help you, flaps? Big wheels? Spoilers? Big props?

I fly my Eagle 2 from a rough field most of the time, but all I have done to it is put 3 inch wheels on it. I was thinking that my next plane could use some extra modifications to help me out a bit since it will be a faster model, including spoilers or flaps.
Old 06-07-2006, 10:33 AM
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Deadeye
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Our field is pretty smooth and long, but I have flown from some ...ummm...interesting places before. Large diameter low pitch props work great. Flaperons work the best, as most planes use 2 servos for ailerons anyway. No mods needed, just program flaperons in your computer radio, assuming you are using one. Headwinds are your friend in a situation like that.
Old 06-10-2006, 02:29 PM
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N46203
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Flaperons eh? I was thinking that a speed brake would work better for a plane like an Eagle 2, since it's such a floater.
Old 06-10-2006, 02:40 PM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

For planes that are generally classified as "floaters" speed brakes, flaperons, etc arent generally much help as the plane already slows down to a crawl anyway.

If the plane floats in you shouldnt have any problems on a short runway. On my trainer with just a few mile an hour head wind I can slow it down and land it in an extremely tight area.

Something you can try to (I like to do this when I am just goofing around). If the plane has diehedral you can use opposite rudder and aileron to slow it down. So on landing approach use left rudder and right aileron and then every second or so alternate. It makes for a funny looking landing but you can lose a lot of airspeed really quick. I like to bring the plane around hot and then use this technique to drop airspeed fast and set the plane down smooth.

Larger wheels help, low pitch props are good too.
Old 06-10-2006, 03:12 PM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Yeah I'm working on getting proficient with my slips, but I haven't dared to try them down low yet! Although I find them more effective for dropping altitude fast than letting off speed, although I guess if you alternate that would work quite well. Perhaps I'll try it.
Old 06-10-2006, 05:50 PM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

As with any new tecnique always try it out several mistakes high.

In general trainer or other low wing loading aircraft are pretty forgiving with things like that.

But I dont think using an airbrake or flaperon will really help that much. Although it doesnt hurt to try. The only time I have found flaperon useful is for 3D. They really dont work that well as flaps. You would be better off installing flaps.
Old 06-10-2006, 08:58 PM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Slipping is about losing altitude without gaining speed, not losing speed, but it's a good technique if you have a short approach (i.e. big trees on final). Alternating slips seems to be asking for trouble, though.
Old 06-10-2006, 10:45 PM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Given what you want to be able to do with your airplane I would suggest that you may want to take the time to add functional flaps. One thing that you don't want to do is to use flaperons, they will only encourage tip stall and not buy you all that much in performance. Your best bet is to add flaps, and keep you ailerons functioning as ailerons, flaps that are set up for throws just a bit beyond 30 deg tend to really increase drag and not produce much additional lift, you can bleed of a lot of speed, and make high angle approaches for landing. Another plus for using flaps is that you can add a bit of flaps, after you get to take off speed and climb out fast. Not to say learning to do side slips is a bad thing you should still learn the technique but you will find that proper use of real flaps can extend the performance of an aircraft when stol is important. That is why they are used in full size aircraft; but other then warbirds, which have high wingloading, you don' t often see them used in RC...
If it were me I add the flaps and learn to use them, along with learning the side slip technique.
Just my opinion....
Old 06-11-2006, 08:53 AM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying


ORIGINAL: nickj

Slipping is about losing altitude without gaining speed, not losing speed, but it's a good technique if you have a short approach (i.e. big trees on final). Alternating slips seems to be asking for trouble, though.
I was talking mainly about doing it on a trainer (and really only when I am goofing around).

But I think with low wing loading aircraft you can generally put them down in super tight areas without the use of slipping, flaperons, flaps, etc. Its just a matter of practice.
Old 06-11-2006, 09:36 AM
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Now I fly at a huge AMA field, 50 X 600'. But years ago I flew from college parking lot. It was 300' long, but surrounded by trees. I wanted a twin. I was afraid I might have trouble getting the twin back in our hole in the woods runway. So I built it with flaps. Well, the coolest thing about that plane was the flaps. I could slow down to nothing and even jam the stick forward and dive in over the trees without gaining any speed. Flaps are a hoot !!!
Now, even at our huge AMA field, I have a T28 with huge flaps. And I have them drop down to about 45 or 50 degrees. The cool thing about flaps, if you go more than 30 degrees, you get a huge increase in the drag. This gives you great speed control on your approach and rediculously slow landing speeds, even with fairly heavy and fast planes. (If you just want max lift, 30 degrees is about optimum )
I absolutely love flying airplanes with flaps !!! I like scale. I am building a Sig Bonanza ( if you call visiting it in the shop once a week building ). It will have flaps and be my T-n-G baby.
Flaps are fun ! But I do not recommend flaperons. Flaperons negate one very important characteristic of regualr flaps. With conventional inboard flaps, the section of the wing with the flap has an ultra high angle of attack with the flaps extended. The outboard section, the section without flaps has the normal angle of attack. The result is a very exagerated wash out effect which makes the plane very stable and resists tip stalls. Flaperons do not offer this protection. It is possible to use flaperons in conjuction with conventional inboard flaps and maintain the washout effect. But the flaperons must deflect downward less than the inboard flaps.
Another STOL trick is the wing tips. Generally STOL aircraft will have droopy tips. But I believe that any fence type device near the tip will aid in maintaining longitudinal flow.
One other trick is to have landing that have extra travel or landing gear that are flexible enough to absorb a landing with a high sink rate without bouncing the plane back into the air. Softer foamy tires help also. So you can hold your sink rate all the way to the ground without needing to round out and flair much.

There is one other technigue that may be useful, particularly for a floater coming in over tall obstacles. Its called crowing. Inboard flaps down, but both ailerons defected up. You hook up the ailerons just like you do for flaperons, but you deflect them upward instead of downward. They are used to spoil lift. The flaps are deflected beyond 30 dgrees and are used for drag.
Old 06-11-2006, 03:37 PM
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N46203
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Default RE: "Bush" Flying

Do any of you have to use interesting approach techniques where you fly? The field that I fly from has very very tall trees in line with my landing strip, so I have to come in from a 60 degree angle then turn to a reaaal short final. It's not long enough to support an average approach even with sideslipping in, because there's no room for a go-around. But since I come in at an angle I open up a lot more usable runway. I have to be really careful though because there's no room to recover from a stall as my turn is done at about 15 feet agl, so it's a real shallow bank angle. A lot of fun though to try and place it perfectly!

On the takeoff run I have to make a climbing right turn about 15 degrees in order to go around some trees, that makes the takeoffs very interesting Not to mention the field itself is quite rough. What mods have you guys done to your landing gear to help them withstand rough fields?

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