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putty for glassing and painting

Old 03-17-2007, 05:28 PM
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Gringo Flyer
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Default putty for glassing and painting

I am learning to glass and paint and am needing a putty to use after priming and sanding. I am glassing using the water based poly method. All the particular puttys I have seen recomended are not available where I live so I have been looking for a substitute. I recently saw in a paint store a putty that is used on cars. It comes in a quart sized paint can and is available in grey or burnt red. It has the consistency of really thick paint. It probably has a similar consistency to wood putty but is wet. I asked the clerk about it and he said he it is applied with a squeegy and then sanded off. This putty has a pretty strong smell and the quart can is fairly heavy.

Does this sound like the types of putty that would normally be used on a glassed model?
Old 03-17-2007, 08:59 PM
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KidVermin
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

Yes, it sounds very similar to the "Spot n' Glaze" primer putty we have up here. Ours in the tube is about like tooth paste which I buy at an auto parts store. It's excellent to fil the small air bubbles in glass fuselages or glass lay up. Once dry, it's so easy to sand and feather out.
Old 03-17-2007, 09:57 PM
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

ORIGINAL: Gringo Flyer

I am learning to glass and paint and am needing a putty to use after priming and sanding. I am glassing using the water based poly method. All the particular puttys I have seen recomended are not available where I live so I have been looking for a substitute. I recently saw in a paint store a putty that is used on cars. It comes in a quart sized paint can and is available in grey or burnt red. It has the consistency of really thick paint. It probably has a similar consistency to wood putty but is wet. I asked the clerk about it and he said he it is applied with a squeegy and then sanded off. This putty has a pretty strong smell and the quart can is fairly heavy.

Does this sound like the types of putty that would normally be used on a glassed model?
"Spot Putty" (automotive stores in a tube) is fine for small areas, but it can add weight in a hurry for large areas.

If you are filling low spots I suggest a light weight putty such as light weight spackle or the Hobbico filler. Just give it a coat of poly after it is dry before spraying any more primer/paint.
Old 03-18-2007, 12:47 AM
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

I too would think that the body putty would be too heavy. Perhaps you could use a filler in the poly like talc or corn starch. I'd suggest doing a test first as I have not tried either, but I still can't imagine it being as heavy as the spot putty.

Scott
Old 03-18-2007, 02:55 AM
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

I frequently use automotive body fillers on my scale models.

The spot putty, mentioned above, works well. Automotive paint stores should carry it.

There are also light weight "Bondo" type fillers available.

If you can't find these, talk to the people at the paint store. Explain what you are doing, and ask for suggestions. I find these people very helpful. You may even find out that other modelers use their products.

The water based poly will hold up to these fillers, and auto primer and paints.

I'm in the process of detailing and painting a Ziroli Stuka, using water based poly and an automotive fillers and primer. You should have no problems.
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Old 03-18-2007, 08:44 AM
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

If you are using the spot putty for the intended purpose - filling small imperfections - the weight is not a factor as most all of what is put on is sanded off, leaving only that which is filling the small imperfection. For this I use "Bondo Glazing & Spot Putty" that comes in a red tube. If, however, you are looking at fixing large (say 1" diameter and larger) dents, holes, gaps and depressions then I suggest using light weight spackle that is normally used on drywall, then sanding and then priming again.
Old 03-20-2007, 10:29 PM
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John Sohm
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Default RE: putty for glassing and painting

It's tough to beat microballoons and resin for larger dent repairs. I wouldn't use regular body filler for large wing fairings or such but microballoons and resin mixed to a thick putty type consistency works great. When mixed with polyester resin, it's easily carved when it achieves a "cheese" like hardness and sands easily when cured fully. It's not the cheapest method but I still think it's the best for durable, lightweight repairs. Vinyl spackle and similar products are ok but they're very soft. I usually harden with CA glue.

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