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How we are percieved by the public

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How we are percieved by the public

Old 03-06-2003, 05:52 PM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

I couldn't find a more appropriate forum to post this in, so I hope the moderators will indulge me a bit.

I do not intend this thread to be any kind of bash towards anyone, although undoubtedly some folks will want to vent their frustrations.

While working on my web site (and being unemployed again) I've gotten frustrated with trying to explain to employers how my skill set will benefit them.

I'm one of those people who can do pretty much any job where ever I work. Unfortunately, it's hard to get that across on my resume. So I started thinking about my skills and created a new page on my web site.

The reason I am posting here is that there must be several things I'm leaving out. So what are your ideas about what skills you've developed simply because you are a model builder?

Here's what I've come up with so far:

http://www.airfieldmodels.com/model_builder_profile.htm
Old 03-06-2003, 06:28 PM
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FLYBOY
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Nice site, but like anything in the world, perception is everything. My brother once said he didn't want to be a salesman. I told him that everything you do in life is based on sales. (He was one of the best salesman I ever knew, he just didn't know it). I have been selling since I was 12. Not always selling stuff, but everything is selling. You need to sell yourself to your potential new boss. He doesn't really care what you do with your personal life. You need to sell yourself to him. What can you do to make him money. That is what it all comes down to. I flew private jets for a while and still fly for a private individual. In explaining to your boss what you have to offer him, you need to ask questions to find out what he does. Going in with a list of what you can do is good, but going in and explaining how you can help his company with examples of what you have to offer pertaining to what he needs is a big plus. Don't go in with a notion that you have to prove yourself as a modeler. If your going in as a dishwasher, prove to them that you will be the best dishwasher they will find becuase .... or if you are looking to fly planes, that you are the best pilot for the job because ....

There are a of poeple out there probably applying for the same spot you will be appliing for. If you set out to prove you are something based on modeling and they don't share your thoughts, you will stick out as someone they don't want to work with. Make it work for you, not against you. Just my 2 cent rambling.
Old 03-06-2003, 06:35 PM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

FlyBoy - I agree with what you've said and that is what I always attempt to do. For example, I applied at a cabinet shop once that was advertising for people with no experience.

So I tried to explain to the guy why I could this work and he just didn't care. Didn't really matter because it was a crap job anyway, but still. I didn't try to convince him that I was a good model builder. I tried to explain to him what skills I had that would transfer over.

He went on to say, "We don't do that here. We slap formica on press board and ship it out." Sounds like quality wasn't something he really cared about. I should have said, I'm a crappy model builder, but I can build 10 a week.
Old 03-06-2003, 09:37 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

No, that is the type of job where they just want a body. I don't think anything you said would help. Maybe just proof positive that you are puctual, and willing to do what ever they need. Didn't mean for that post to sound like a lecture. Just came out that way. There are a lot of people that don't give modeling any merrit. I get that all the time at the airport. Then when they see the planes, both model and full scale I am building, they are always impressed and want to see them fly. Most don't understand what a model really is. I figure its their loss and change the subject. Not worth the effort with some.
Old 03-06-2003, 09:56 PM
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MinnFlyer
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Something you should think about is to include pictures with your resume. Use pictures that show size as well as construction.

I have been there too. I hate telling people that I build model airplanes because they always think that same thing. They picture those little rubber band powered models that you get at the corner drugstore for 50 cents.

What I really LIKE, is telling someone that I build model planes, and then show them the one I have in the back of the car! It never fails, their reaction is one of AMAZEMENT!

"WOW! When you said you built model planes, I thought you meant Little Ones".

Then I say, "This IS a Little One.

Old 03-06-2003, 10:03 PM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

MinnFlyer - That's exactly how I got my last job. The owner pulled half the employees out to look at my plane. Unfortunately, I got laid off with a bunch of other people due to lack of work.

I had a plane in the car back when I went to the cabinet shop and the dude wasn't at all interested in looking at it. He just had a rotten disposition. I think that job would have been miserable if I had gotten it.

But, this really isn't about finding a job. It's just about the general public and their reaction. What you said about their perception is dead on. They just don't have a clue what we do or what it takes.

Granted, some of what I put on that page is reaching for me, but it really depends on the person as to what they have good knowledge in and what they are merely aware of. For example, I know jack about electronics. I know there's usually a red wire and some other color and they shouldn't be connected together in most cases.
Old 03-06-2003, 10:11 PM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Just updated and rearranged the page a little. I need to rewrite the intro too. Sounds a little agitated.
Old 03-07-2003, 11:52 AM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

I put things like a good eye for detail and able to work from plans and drawings. also i can design and build from scratch and change a design along the way to make it work better. i didnt actully refer to model planes. i also have simple web site design in my CV which leads to my site. cunning hey.
As for Joe public how do they see us.. well, in summer we always have cliff walkers stop and look as the pass us, cars pull up and familys get out to watch.. we never hear a bad word from spectators about the noise or anything. Anyone else probably only knows what they see in the model shop window as the walk past.. a few dull trainers and thats it
Old 03-07-2003, 04:39 PM
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Bish Wheeler
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Perception, perception, perception. I'm in sales, insurance sales. When I am in a coversation I tell them my hobby is "Sculpture". It imediately takes the hobby out of the relm of "childrens toys".

For what it's worth.

Bish
Old 03-07-2003, 05:40 PM
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MinnFlyer
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Good point. "Wood Sculpture"

Another nice add-on is "Museum-Quality Scale Aircraft"
Old 03-07-2003, 09:01 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

I'm going to be a little blunt here. I've been on the hiring side of the desk quite a bit. Long list of skills don't give me much to work with. What I'm really looking for is achievement in a job similar to what I'm offering. After I know what you've achieved, I'm going to ask you what was your role on the team that did the achievement. I want the leader, or the "buck stops here" guy on the team. Even if I'm hiring for a junior role, I'm still looking for the same thing, just a smaller project.

So, how does the middle kind of guy get through, particularly if the job they do isn't project oriented? They have to express themselves in my language. If it's a system administrator, maybe they tell me that due to their leadership, there were absolutely zero outages last year, and what they did to achieve that (built in redundancy, etc). Or they came up with an innovative way to rotate tapes offsite that saved a ton of hassle.

In other words, I'm not interested in a list of skills on a resume, I'm interested in an interview in which it's obvious your skills have produced success in my field. I'm not interested in you telling me that you can do well in any job, you're that kind of person. You need to tell me what the variety of jobs you've had, and how you were successful in them.

Once I determine that you've achieved success, and I know I'm going to offer you a job, only then might I ask you what your hobbies are.
Old 03-07-2003, 09:11 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

i know you well...
wont take on the trainee because i have no experience, but i cant get experience because I'm not taken on
Old 03-07-2003, 09:36 PM
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Default Parallel Crossovers

This hobby requires a certain amount of intellect and attention to detail. It also requires a bit of intuitiveness to design, develop and the application of theories for proven and successful remote controlled flight. Some physics and math apply as well.

It's kinda tough to resist talking about our hobby to those that are not interested or do not find the same satisfaction that we do. When we do find that person, we could talk for hours without realizing it.

It would also depend on what line of work your looking for. I would think a cabinet or woodworking shop would benefit from the experience of building model airplanes but from what you told us, I guess it depends on the attitide of the cabinet shop owner.

Hobby parallel's that I do know - there certainly seems to be a fair share of full-scale aviation enthusiasts involved with RC whether it's pilots and/or mechanics. MD's or surgeon's seem to benefit from the hobby as they use RC to keep their fingers limber as well as their eye-hand coordination skills razor sharp.

And then there's the military. They're always messing with drones and UAV's so there's bound to be an RC correlation in that respect!

Ted
Old 03-07-2003, 10:09 PM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Folks - thanks for all your replies. I really didn't mean for this to turn into a "Help CafeenMan find suitable employment" thread. Take it for what it is. What skills does a model-builder have.

Now, if you actually have an opening, then I'd be more than happy to talk to you.
Old 03-07-2003, 10:28 PM
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JimTrainor
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Default How we are percieved by the public

If a person wished to leverage hobby skills in the employment market, I'd keep the message as simple as possible: a model builders skills are in the area of model building. There are individuals employed full time making models. For example, for architects and museums.
Others may not require a model builder per se, but might recognize how a model builder might be well suited to the task at hand. Those individuals won't require much explaination regarding how a model builder would suite the task.
Old 03-10-2003, 10:09 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Hobbies won't open many doors. You say: "Detail oriented and meticulous dexterity with great focus and concentration abilities." The employer hears: "Will want evenings and weekends free to build and fly."

I have been told that mentioning you are a sailor (I am) will kill a job interview. Those people are apt to want time off, especially weekends.

And Phillybaby: To be brutally honest, most managers usually don't want people who are "just waiting for a chance." What did you do while you were waiting? How far did you get in scouts? Night school? Volunteer work? Positions of responsibility at church, school, flying club?
Old 03-10-2003, 10:36 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

You say: "Detail oriented and meticulous dexterity with great focus and concentration abilities." The employer hears: "Will want evenings and weekends free to build and fly."
Damn right, i make it a point that i wont work Tuesdays nights so i can race, i don't spend money on that to throw a championship away just because i have to work an extra hour one night, my free time is worth WAY! more than min wage. But it doesn't matter if i don't fly or anything in that time. Maybe i just carry over the same idea that if they don't teach it in school time, i ain't doing it in my time. I bet we'd all be happy if we didn't have to work, tho I'm not one of those people that plays the system and enjoys the high life, infact, the system is screwing me over.

What did you do while you were waiting? last time was learn to prophang How far did you get in scouts? ummm did a few years and got loads of badges Night school? hoping to do some sort of photoshop course soon Volunteer work? i'll help a mate build a fence or paint his house, but i don't "work" for free Positions of responsibility at church lol whats one of them , school i failed.. i didn't get a girl pregnant at 14, tho i did well in what the teachers wanted us to do, tho in my circle the highest results has resulted in the lowest pay???? , flying club?i could be considered one of the main flyers, i goto all the displays we put on with a small dedicated band of flyers that can be bothered and i'll take flyers on the buddy box at the shows, currently training a father and son
Old 03-10-2003, 10:44 PM
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Default How we are perceived

I think the public perception of model airplane builders/flyers is that we are a bunch of overgrown kids playing with our toys.

I have known a master scale scratch builder (the guy made every piece of his plane except the tires, engine, and radio...from his own plans) and at the field visitors would still think it was "cute"..yeah, cute.

He probably had a couple thousand hours making it that cute. The fact that it was an award winning scale replica was totally lost on the public. It was just a toy plane, but it was cute!

I must add that modeling did land me this job!! One of my flying buddies has a brother who works here. I saw an ad in the paper, went to talk to the owner with said brother, and got the job before I even filled out the application.

That was 15 years ago. I started out as a sandblaster. Now I have one person over me..the owner of the company.
Old 03-11-2003, 02:20 AM
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Default CUTE!

Doesn't that beat all. I build from scratch and I do a pretty fair job, I think. Built a 1/4 scale Goshawk and put in all the detail.........I get "it's soooo cute", mostly from women.

Spent a year building a Shelby 427 SC Cobra Roadster replica. Get the same thing when I go to the grocery store, "What a cute car". Men say it's "Cool", women say it's "Cute". I think it's a compliment.

Bish
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Old 03-11-2003, 02:26 AM
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CafeenMan
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Bish - That's just women trying to deflate your ego. They're good at that. I think it's genetic.
Old 03-14-2003, 02:11 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

Nah, not genetic, just BRAINLESS on ome peoples. The really smart ones get shot down with a " Toys don't Kill You , These will.." Job Applications?, never mention hobbies unless asked. Management don't normally want to know what you do in your spare time. And if they do ask in detail, make sure you have picies to back your claims on hand.This has been my experience with managment. Gee I wish I had paid more attentiobn in school.
Old 03-14-2003, 07:31 PM
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Default How we are percieved by the public

I think the public perception of model airplane builders/flyers is that we are a bunch of overgrown kids playing with our toys.

ChuckAuger said it best.

This, unfortunately is the publics perception of our hobby and probably always will be. To be 100% honest I had the same perception before I became hooked. People just don't realize how complex these models are, and how much time and effort (not to mention money) goes into even an ARF let alone a kit.

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