Go Back  RCU Forums > RC Boats > RC Boats General Discussion
Reload this Page >

Best boat for towing a net

Notices
RC Boats General Discussion Discuss general rc boating topics here.

Best boat for towing a net

Old 08-08-2020, 05:38 AM
  #1  
sww
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default Best boat for towing a net

Hello, I'm looking for advice on what the best boat may be for a specific purpose I have in mind. I have a small pond, about 100' x 50' and has an island in the middle with lots of trees on and off the island. In the fall I need to try to get the leaves out before they sink. I've made a net about 6' wide and put 2 bouys on each end. It is about 6" high so just high enough to skim the water and it's not very heavy. I'm thinking I could pull the net with a RC boat. The net will get heavy as it fills up with leaves but it will almost always be close enough to shore to pull out with a pole and empty the net. I would like to keep it under $100, on the other hand I'm sure a $20 boat is going to fail. I'll go higher than $100 if I think there is a good chance it will work, I just don't want to sink much in on an experiment.
So a couple criteria:
1. Be able to pull the net. There are some boats in the 10" - 14" range around $60 that have good reviews but I'm thinking maybe something larger would be better.
2. Battery life and boat durability. What should I expect? I will be running the boat slow but as the net gets heavier it'll take some power to keep it moving. In the fall I would probably run it everyday, for 10 - 20 minutes.
3. It should be maneuverable at slow speeds, I've read some reviews where the boat is great while racing but not real good at slower speeds.

Thanks in advance for the advice!
Old 08-08-2020, 09:40 AM
  #2  
mfr02
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Blackpool Lancs, UNITED KINGDOM
Posts: 1,400
Likes: 0
Received 21 Likes on 21 Posts
Default

I suspect that you've just been looking at fast toy boats, which is what ebay tends to concentrate on. Pulling a net that size needs a lot of grunt and more size, weight and stability in the tow boat. A 10-14 inch fast toy, when hitched to a 6 foot net will just sit there churning water. Towing needs a tug boat.
For home building, which is the only way to keep anywhere near your budget, do a search for "springer tug". 18" long, simple, basic power and control.
As a rough price guide, for the last 30 or so years, model boats that are intended for re-use cost, where I live, about "100 plus 100 for every foot or part foot length". Convert to your own currency.
You might also need to consider mounting the net on a rod and pushing. Floating debris and props don't play nice.
Old 08-09-2020, 12:09 AM
  #3  
Justaddwata
My Feedback: (3)
 
Justaddwata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: RI-USA, RI
Posts: 6,127
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default

It wont work sorry.

RC Boats have issue enough with leaves and debris in the water without the added expectation of pulling a net. I would say to use a 120ft length of rope and pull the net by hand from one side to the other and then walk to the other side and pull it back. The power needed to pull a net full of leaves would be more fitting an outboard if your pond is anything like mine.
The following users liked this post:
perttime (08-13-2020)
Old 08-10-2020, 02:06 AM
  #4  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 9,242
Likes: 0
Received 52 Likes on 50 Posts
Default

The only R/C boat that I know of that MIGHT be able to pull a net in the way you want would be the Dumas Mr Darby, a boat kit that isn't made any more. People used to brag about how they would be in a 12-14ft boat and have the Darby tow them all over the lake. With that said, I have to agree with JAW's post above, R/Cs and weeds/leaves don't get along. I bought the wife a Aquacraft Atlantic tug(another boat that's no longer sold) and, first time out, she wrapped the prop shaft with weeds, locking the shaft until I could clear it of the weeds, almost half an hours worth of work. Your best bet is to stretch your net between two floats and pull it from the shore. You will be amazed at how heavy leaves and water can be
Old 08-11-2020, 09:16 AM
  #5  
Got RPM
 
Got RPM's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: AZ
Posts: 830
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 6 Posts
Cool

The safest boat type would be a large airboat. Mine was built of PVC pipe and a 4S power system. I’ve used mine to bring in large gas boats often, although a net full of leaves would be more difficult depending on its size. But regardless, meeting even a $100 build cost would be almost impossible starting from scratch, $200 is more reasonable if you’re a good scrounger. And you’d have to build it unless you can find a used one for sale.


.
Old 08-13-2020, 12:51 PM
  #6  
teamwills23
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 12
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Originally Posted by mfr02 View Post
I suspect that you've just been looking at fast toy boats, which is what ebay tends to concentrate on. Pulling a net that size needs a lot of grunt and more size, weight and stability in the tow boat. A 10-14 inch fast toy, when hitched to a 6 foot net will just sit there churning water. Towing needs a tug boat.
For home building, which is the only way to keep anywhere near your budget, do a search for "springer tug". 18" long, simple, basic power and control.
As a rough price guide, for the last 30 or so years, model boats that are intended for re-use cost, where I live, about "100 plus 100 for every foot or part foot length". Convert to your own currency.
You might also need to consider mounting the net on a rod and pushing. Floating debris and props don't play nice.
Thanks for your info buddy, i liked it
Old 08-14-2020, 03:12 AM
  #7  
sww
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2020
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Thanks for all the input! I did see a video on youtube of a tug boat pulling a jon boat so something like that may work. It's probably not realistic before this fall that I would be able to build my first boat but that may be the best long term plan. For now I'll keep an eye out for something used and maybe tweak my net some. Possibly make it more of a cage where the leaves will get pushed up out of the water and drain making them lighter and less drag in the water. Also would probably be easier to attach the boat in the back and push rather than pull. If I come up with something that works I'll post and any more ideas please let me know.
Old 08-14-2020, 07:27 AM
  #8  
mfr02
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Blackpool Lancs, UNITED KINGDOM
Posts: 1,400
Likes: 0
Received 21 Likes on 21 Posts
Default

If the boat is pushing, the net gets to the leaves first. If the propeller finds the leaves before the net, it will end badly.
Best bet is probably something substantial to push the net on its frame, but send it out with a line attached. That way, when the amount of push gets to be too much, you have a way of recovering manually.
The amount of energy required to lift a netful of soggy leaves will far outweigh any benefit gained from draining them, which will probably not happen until well after you get it back to the bank. Keep things simple. i don't see leaves being lifted - I do foresee the net and boom being dragged down. A shorter span might work better - less to push.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.