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choppy water

Old 02-01-2009, 01:23 PM
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sidav
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Default choppy water

whats the best sourght of boat for choppy water 20mph winds need a boat for the winter or one that writes it self when it flips
Old 02-01-2009, 01:59 PM
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rblubaugh
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Default RE: choppy water

Choppy Water,

There are two kits that come to mind, especially when you specify self-righting when it flips itself over. First is the Midwest 47' Coast Guard Lifeboat #986 available from MACK Products, www.mackproductsrc.com, and the second is the Dumas U S Coast Guard Lifeboat kit #1203, available from Dumas, www.dumasestore.com and other hobby stores who sell Dumas models.

The Midwest has a length of 30" and beam of 8 3/4", scale 1/19 and the Dumas model is 33" long with a 9" beam, scale 3/4" to 1 foot.

Hope this helps you out.

Bob
Old 02-01-2009, 07:04 PM
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Default RE: choppy water


Check out the real Scottish & Irish ocean rescue boats. Contact the orginazations for plans help.
Old 02-01-2009, 11:02 PM
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Default RE: choppy water


ORIGINAL: sidav

whats the best sourght of boat for choppy water 20mph winds need a boat for the winter or one that writes it self when it flips
A very broad discription. Are you considering a gas or electric boat. Are you looking for something fast or more scale? There are many many boats that can tackle conditions like you are listing - and many other boats that can be modified to suit.
Old 02-02-2009, 10:31 AM
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sidav
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Default RE: choppy water

sorry i should of been more pacific, iv got a 25"mono prince electric at the moment but its not very good in rough weather i havent got any trim tabs on it yet but i have some on order so it might get better? reading the forums it should, i need an electric speed boat or similar that is good for winter use 20mph winds if it does flip it should right itself . iv been serching for ages now and i carnt find anything in my price range (£200ish) im new to this so bare with me. thank you.
Old 02-02-2009, 11:16 AM
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Ron Olson
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Default RE: choppy water

I'd think that with you living in the UK that you could find more self-righting boats there as I've seen a lot of articles on them in Marine Modeling International magazine.
Electric boats are the most used for your purpose but I have seen it done with nitro and gas powered boats.
Old 02-02-2009, 12:55 PM
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Default RE: choppy water

ORIGINAL: sidav

sorry i should of been more pacific, iv got a 25"mono prince electric at the moment but its not very good in rough weather i havent got any trim tabs on it yet but i have some on order so it might get better? reading the forums it should, i need an electric speed boat or similar that is good for winter use 20mph winds if it does flip it should right itself . iv been serching for ages now and i carnt find anything in my price range (£200ish) im new to this so bare with me. thank you.
Hi sidav,

It's very easy to add a floodchamber to the 25"Prince, let me know if you want some pointers.

Trimtabs do not improve the handling of such a relative small boat in rough conditions, even my heavier 12 cell monohull simply gets blow over in those conditions.

(I love your 'charades style' use of the English langwitch ).

Regards, Jan.
Old 02-02-2009, 02:23 PM
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sidav
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Default RE: choppy water

that would be good, i think thats the best idea could you give me some pointers please
Old 02-02-2009, 05:13 PM
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Default RE: choppy water

ORIGINAL: sidav
that would be good, i think thats the best idea could you give me some pointers please
I'll do that tomorow, if you don't mind, it's getting late and I have to work tomorrow.

Regards, Jan.
Old 02-03-2009, 12:07 PM
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pompebled
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Default RE: choppy water

Floodchamber.

To establish if a floodchamber is an option for your boat, take the boat ready to run, tape the hatch shut and put it upside down in the water.
Tape weight to the port side of the hull bottom until it starts to roll back up.

This weight (+ 10% to be sure) is the minimum content of your floodchamber.

Put tape on the hull alongside the hatch, from the transom to the nose (in a straight line) and calculate if the volume you just marked, will hold the desired amount of water.

If so, make a cardboard template of the floodchamber wall, I usually make it in two pieces, which I tape together.
If you're satisfied with the fit, cut the floodchamber wall out of a piece of epoxy sheet, 0,5 - 0,8 mm thick.

I make the sheet myself, by putting a number of layers of glasscloth and epoxy, pressed between two flat smooth surfaces, either waxed, or covered in clingfilm, to prevent the epoxy from sticking to it.

Once the epoxy has cured, cut it along the template and testfit it in the hull, it should be a reasonable tight fit, without deforming the bottom and deck.

Cover the floodchamber wall with a piece of dry glass cloth, slightly oversized and tap it onto the epoxy sheet with a brush and epoxy, making sure the edges are not covered in epoxy.
After the epoxy has cured, cut the glass cloth but leave a 'skirt' of 1/2", this skirt allows you to epoxy the floodchamber wall into the hull without too much trouble.
The part in the nose requires some patience and a long brush, to be able to reach the tip of the floodchamber.

Once it has cured, cut out the opening in the transom.

Mix a bit of epoxy resin and let it run into the floodchamber seam, move the hull to make sure it runs in every part of the joint.

Allow to cure and fill the chamber with water and check for leaks, if there are any, dry out the floodchamber and repeat the resin pouring.

Drill a small hole in the nose of the floodchamber to let the air out in case of a flip and drill some holes on deck, to allow water in after a flip.

The pictures show my 25" Xcalibur, the first picture shows the floodchamber exit on the port side, running all the way towards the front under the deck.
The other pictures show the inside, with the floodchamber wall in place and the motormount glassed in. The fourth picture is the template for one of my FE, to give you an idea what ot should look like. Last picture shows the row of holes to let the water and air in and out of the floodchamber.

Let me know if you have questions.

Regards, Jan.
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Old 02-03-2009, 12:17 PM
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pompebled
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Default RE: choppy water

Bugger, I'd forgotten I already had a prepared text on the floodchamber wall..., enjoy.

Floodchamber wall.

I make a thin sheet of epoxy/glasscloth between two pieces of glass, covered in clingfilm to prevent the resin to stick to the glass.
Waxing the surface will do, but clingfilm is quicker.
Also anything with a smooth surface will do, I just happened to have a few pieces of glass at hand.

The sheet I make has roughtly the shape of the floodchamber wall, so having a card template of it helps determen the size.

As I build competition boats, weight is an issue, so the sheet is very thin, usually two/three layers of glasscloth (160gr).
Once the glasscloth and resin is in place I cover it with the second piece of glass and put some weight on it, squeezing the excess resin out.

When it has cured (24h epoxy), I peel it from the glass sheet and use the template to cut it to fit in the hull.
The epoxy sheet is paperthin and not yet watertight, that we’ll fix later.

Make sure the wall fits into the hull without any pressure, in order to avoid deforming the hull in any way.
Small gaps are ok.

Now for the clever part:

When a floodchamber runs along the entire length of the hull, it’s a RPITA to reach into the bow section to laminate in small strips of glasscloth to seal off the floodchamber.

Here’s my solution:

When the floodchamber wall fits, I laminate an extra layer of glasscloth onto the wall, leaving an overlap of half an inch all around.
Make sure the resin is applied very thin and tap the glasscloth onto the wall, so the overlap stays clear of the resin.

After it has cured, I cut the overlap to the desired size.

Position the wall into the hull (the overlap will close the small gaps) and laminate the overlap onto the hull with 24h epoxy, using a long thin brush to reach the bow section.

Cut out the transom and pour resin into the floodchamber, turning the hull so it runs into every corner, let it cure and fill the floodchamber with water to check for leaks.
Repeat the resin pour if there are any (after drying it out ofcourse).

Drill some holes into the deck to let the air out / water in, in case of a flip.

Ready.

It sounds very eleborate, but the actual installing of the wall only took me 20 minutes.

Original idea from Holgi, Germany.

Regards, Jan.

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