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3D printed parts

Old 04-08-2016, 10:53 AM
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67Stingrayj
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Default 3D printed parts

Does anyone know if 3D printed parts would hold up to the abuse of a basher truck? I know there are a number of different types of 3D printers that range in precision, quality etc.

Any experience out there?
Old 04-08-2016, 11:25 AM
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EXT2Rob
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No experience, but I can tell you that the plastics used in 3D printing are NOT going to be durable enough to make, say, a suspension arm. To make small scale accessory stuff like boxes or jacks or other small non-functional parts, 3Dp would work great. But nothing structural.
Old 04-08-2016, 11:41 AM
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67Stingrayj
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That's what I thought. Most recently I was wondering about 1/4" plexiglass as a skid/base plate for my scratch build RC. We laver a laser cutter at my work and we go through loads of the stuff so i could get if cheap. Anybody ever work with any other simple to get materials before?
Old 04-08-2016, 05:02 PM
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collector1231
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I actually have experience with a 3D printed arm. I got it from a friend who gave me his Tmaxx and the one 3D printed arm used ABS plastic and held up for a good 15 runs and took a direct hit onto a concrete mound to snap. I think it might have to do with how it is printed. If it is printed using lines parallel to the chassis, it will not fare so well. If it is printed using lines perpendicular to the chassis, it will hold up better.
Old 04-08-2016, 06:33 PM
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EXT2Rob
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That's interesting, collector. Where'd he get the design file? Or did he also have a 3D scanner? 😏 I can certainly see where how the filament is laid down would effect how strong the part would be. I'm surprised it lasted that long. Impressive.
Old 04-08-2016, 09:43 PM
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Originally Posted by EXT2Rob
That's interesting, collector. Where'd he get the design file? Or did he also have a 3D scanner?  I can certainly see where how the filament is laid down would effect how strong the part would be. I'm surprised it lasted that long. Impressive.
Not sure, but his company probably had a 3D scanner/printer. I was too, lol. Was kinda sad when I broke it, but it is still in 2 pieces.
Old 04-09-2016, 08:35 AM
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plexiglass will shatter (I've tried it on non-rc stuff before that took less abuse)

see if the laser cutter can cut delrin sheets those are sorta cheap, and will take any abuse you can throw at it.
Old 04-09-2016, 12:20 PM
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From what I know of 3D printers, there's different materials that can be used in them to change the strength characteristics. But I don't know much about 3D printers let alone what materials are better for different purposes and you'd probably have to check if the printer can handle it.

Syco is right, plexiglass shatters way too easily for RC use. I've used Lexan for RC battery trays and other RC stuff though. It's more expensive than plexiglass but way stronger and you can get it in anything from thick blocks to thinner sheets like the 1/8 I've used. 1/8 would be good for skid plates and maybe even a chassis with the sides bent up and maybe some bracing like a 1/8 buggy. For bends just draw a line where you want the bend then heat along that line until it starts to bend, hold it where you want until it's cooled and it'll stay there. I've only used a lighter to heat the Lexan but a heat gun would probably be better. Oh and you can thread Lexan. Just drill the hole slightly smaller than your screw, heat the screw up with a lighter and thread it in. Let it cool in the hole and the Lexan is now threaded.

I also agree about using Delrin sheets for some things. I've considered using the stuff for making custom extended suspension arms a few times just never had the time for the project. With a router jig it would be pretty easy to make multiples of an arm without any cnc equipment.

Last edited by Maj_Overdrive; 04-09-2016 at 12:24 PM.
Old 04-10-2016, 01:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Maj_Overdrive
I also agree about using Delrin sheets for some things. I've considered using the stuff for making custom extended suspension arms a few times just never had the time for the project. With a router jig it would be pretty easy to make multiples of an arm without any cnc equipment.
I've actually made a set of a-front arms with a bandsaw for a project I've started working on out of delrin, but sidelined due to things happening. I should really get around to finishing that project soon as it was over half done. I will say I hit one of the rejects(it was cut a lil bit short) with a hammer, and the sucker didn't break(it did move my work bench I hit it so hard)
Old 04-10-2016, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by SyCo_VeNoM
I've actually made a set of a-front arms with a bandsaw for a project I've started working on out of delrin, but sidelined due to things happening. I should really get around to finishing that project soon as it was over half done. I will say I hit one of the rejects(it was cut a lil bit short) with a hammer, and the sucker didn't break(it did move my work bench I hit it so hard)
Plenty of options to cut the stuff, though I wonder how well a laser would work and if there'd be any downsides. I figured with a 1/8 aluminum plate as a router jig it would be a little easier to get them all exactly the same with less chance for rejects though. Already have a Dremel mounted in a table, just set the router bit depth so the jig rides the smooth part of the router bit not the cutting part and have at it. Can even make cutouts in the center of the arms if the jig plate has them as well.

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