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New to Jets/Carf RC Rebel Pro

Old 05-15-2023, 02:24 PM
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Rtflyer7
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Default New to Jets/Carf RC Rebel Pro

Hello everyone, I've been into model aviation since I was a kid. I'm 31 now and have some disposable income lol. I would describe myself as a good pilot. I've flown everything to small foamies, EDF jets, and large scale 3D. However, I'm looking into getting into jets, and I'm interested in the Carf Rebel Pro. I'm new to turbine powered jets and need some advise lol, it seems complicated from the outside looking in. I have a Spektrum IX14. What would you all recommend I would need to complete the build? I know the landing gear, lights, and thrust tube are available with Carf, and I have an idea of what servos to use. A kingtech 210 seems to be a popular choice for the turbine. What radio systems, fuel tank, and other items would you recommend?

Also, it seems there arent detailed instructions for the build, will that make things complicated? Thanks!

Last edited by Rtflyer7; 05-15-2023 at 02:55 PM. Reason: Wrong name of aircraft
Old 05-15-2023, 02:47 PM
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Dave Wilshere
 
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Do you mean Rebel Pro…?
Old 05-15-2023, 02:53 PM
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Rtflyer7
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Originally Posted by Dave Wilshere
Do you mean Rebel ProÖ?
Yes the Rebel lol, dumb mistake.
Old 05-15-2023, 04:30 PM
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Rtflyer7
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Or maybe the 2m version would be better to start out with. A little bit cheaper. But more than likely it would be a rebel as my first jet.
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Old 05-15-2023, 05:14 PM
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RCFlyerDan
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Originally Posted by Rtflyer7
Or maybe the 2m version would be better to start out with. A little bit cheaper. But more than likely it would be a rebel as my first jet.
The 2 m is a perfect size Rebel to start. No bad habits, sweet flying, aerobatics at a slow speed for the small flying sites. Lands slow. For giving. Yet, capable of high speed circuits, inverted flat spins, knife edge outside turns, etc.

Consider a PB Mercury SR2 with GPS and iSat. If youíre using a Spektrum power safe receiver, consider the updated PB iGyro 3xtra with GPS. Itís more like the Cortex products. Iíve owned and flown Cortex products and both are great products. It just depends upon which cult you want to belongÖÖlol. Personally, I only fly Mercury SRS, or Competition SR2 with GPS and iSat Gyro. The advantage of PB with GPS, is that the Gain is controlled by the GPS and the speed of the aircraft. Going fast, GPS tells the gyro lower gain. Slow speeds with flaps for landing, the GPS will give maximum gain set by you. You donít have to flip a switch or anything. Itís automatic. I donít think Cortex has come up with that technology yet.

Best wishes on your choices.

Old 05-15-2023, 05:31 PM
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Does the mercury work with Spektrum? I've only ever needed 1 receiver and don't have much experience with gyros.
Old 05-15-2023, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Rtflyer7
Does the mercury work with Spektrum? I've only ever needed 1 receiver and don't have much experience with gyros.
Yes, and the new version I think only needs the Satellite receivers plugged into the Mercury. But you need the newer satellites. Look at receivers as an insurance policy for your $10,000 jet. Each one for extra reception is cheap. The Rebel will fly beautifully without a gyro, as will many other jets. My first three jets didnít have a gyro. Gyros take the turbulence out of the flight and make the jet look more solid when flying. It makes you work less on the windy days. It isnít necessary, but nice, since you have extra cash in your pocket.

https://www.powerbox-americas.com/co...ox-mercury-srs

4130_BA_Mercury_SR2_EN.pdf
Old 05-16-2023, 05:18 AM
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I would recommend getting hooked up with an experienced Jet Guy. Learning how to build, start, fly and land a jet is different from your EDF experience. You are going to need some experienced folks to get a waiver anyway, if you are in the USA. Building each type/model jet is unique. Just flying EDFs will not get you where you need to be. If you do not build a turbine jet well, it does not matter how well you may be able fly it, etc. If it comes apart in the air or fails to operate in the air, it probably will not last long. If it hot starts, you won't fly it at all. Turbine jets have to be safe. Crashing one in a crowd must be avoided at all costs. Getting help from someone who has been successful, will save you a lot of $s and frustration. Many times, I suggest that a potential jet guy spends a season helping a very experienced jet guy before even building one. You would be surprised what you will learn that will save your build and first few solo flights, etc. It will most-likely also make you a safer jet guy.

A Rebel Classic could be a good start with the right helper. Buddy-box until you have enough experience to fly it well including making landing approaches, etc. It is NOT an EDF. But EDF experience may help, ... somewhat. Buddy boxing is now required to get a turbine waiver in the USA. So, plan to park the Ego and learn from someone that is experienced.

There are a lot of cheaper and more durable options than a Rebel out there. Also, you have to balance a jet purchase to your available budget. More expensive planes tend to fly better and last longer. Also, there are some really cheap jet airframes that just are not built well or do not fly well. For a first jet, cheap can be good. But durability is important. Especially the gear mounts. Startup safety has a bit of learning curve, although a new turbine is usually pretty safe, if installed correctly. Again, this is where an experienced helper can come in. A quality jet build is not something you pick up from the INet! Even with pics and a manual, there is a learning curve to properly address the various connections and integration of the various systems.

A Rebel can be a good option. There are a lot of good pics on the Rebel thread that shows where to position things. The Manual is not half-bad. Learn to fly it on the buddy box. Learning to start it, fly it and land it with a very experienced person helping will increase the jet's longevity! The Classic can be setup and lifted by one person. The Rebel Pro may take an extra person to lift to and from the ground. Although a 31-year-old can handle a Pro for several more years. But a crash with a Rebel Pro is a lot more expensive. Just something to think about, if you fly alone.

The Pro is easier to see when flying, which is another consideration. It is a little more intimidating on final approach. You want a color scheme that you can see. You may want to consider a custom paint scheme on the bottom of the wing. The solid color of a Rebel's wing bottom can be hard to see at certain times.

Lots of things to think about when considering, building and flying a first turbine jet. This is where some real face time with experienced jet guys before the purchase can pay off.

Last edited by Len Todd; 05-16-2023 at 05:20 AM.
Old 05-16-2023, 07:33 AM
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Len makes some very good points and he is a great person to listen to.

I think you can't go wrong with either the Rebel or Rebel Pro. I tend to subscribe to the "bigger flies better" camp and you will be hard pressed to find ANY jet that flies better than the Rebel Pro! I am not making any assumptions about your disposable income so I will not take that or ability to physically handle a large jet as considerations. At any price the RP is one of the best sport jets money can buy with a wide flight envelope and no bad habits.

Another poster mentioned gyros and GPS and iSat and the like, personally I would avoid all of that for my first jet! The RP will fly wonderfully without a gyro or the extra weigh and complexity thereof. Do gyros help smooth out a flight in certain wind conditions, yes, but most of the people I know that have gyros installed, myself included, have them turned off or way down. Again, that to is a matter of personal preference but setting up a gyro, the associated wiring, and layout is an extra learning curve you don't need right now.

Len's best advice was; talk to or partner with an experienced jet pilot in your area (if one is available), that will save you a lot of heartache. It might even make sense to use similar equipment as that person if t is someone you know and trust. Perhaps they use an igyro and you decide to go that route (personal preference).

Since you asked I will give some simple guidelines:
1. Partner with an experienced jet pilot for the airplane build, setup, preflight, and first flights. Don't be afraid to ask for help or get other opinions. That said, use equipment you know and trust, just because a guy you know or that has had success says use a CB400, that is not necessarily gospel, but another data point to consider. In the end it's about your comfort and trust in your equipment.
2. Use high quality equipment- every time I think about saving a buck on linkages or something here and there I think, is this worth losing my airplane
3. Make sure all connections are tight and as slop free as possible- Turbines don't vibrate much but flight loads can be high and servo or linkage play can lead to premature failure
4. Things can and do go wrong, but make sure everything works properly on the ground, altitude does not solve problems you have on the ground. Binding control surfaces, or hanging up gear won't improve just because you are moving 150 MPH. Too many guys make gear up landings because of avoidable setup issues
5. Be at least two steps ahead of the airplane at all times. Energy management and throttle lag take some getting used to. Jets have to build up momentum, you do not have instant thrust when you advance the throttle stick.
6. Have fun!!!

Welcome to the jet age! It can be a little intimidating at first but it is still just RC flight with a different power source.

Best of luck
Anthony
Old 05-16-2023, 07:58 AM
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I fixed the thread title, it was driving my OCD crazy
Old 05-17-2023, 03:11 AM
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Rtflyer7
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Originally Posted by AAbdu
Len makes some very good points and he is a great person to listen to.

I think you can't go wrong with either the Rebel or Rebel Pro. I tend to subscribe to the "bigger flies better" camp and you will be hard pressed to find ANY jet that flies better than the Rebel Pro! I am not making any assumptions about your disposable income so I will not take that or ability to physically handle a large jet as considerations. At any price the RP is one of the best sport jets money can buy with a wide flight envelope and no bad habits.

Another poster mentioned gyros and GPS and iSat and the like, personally I would avoid all of that for my first jet! The RP will fly wonderfully without a gyro or the extra weigh and complexity thereof. Do gyros help smooth out a flight in certain wind conditions, yes, but most of the people I know that have gyros installed, myself included, have them turned off or way down. Again, that to is a matter of personal preference but setting up a gyro, the associated wiring, and layout is an extra learning curve you don't need right now.

Len's best advice was; talk to or partner with an experienced jet pilot in your area (if one is available), that will save you a lot of heartache. It might even make sense to use similar equipment as that person if t is someone you know and trust. Perhaps they use an igyro and you decide to go that route (personal preference).

Since you asked I will give some simple guidelines:
1. Partner with an experienced jet pilot for the airplane build, setup, preflight, and first flights. Don't be afraid to ask for help or get other opinions. That said, use equipment you know and trust, just because a guy you know or that has had success says use a CB400, that is not necessarily gospel, but another data point to consider. In the end it's about your comfort and trust in your equipment.
2. Use high quality equipment- every time I think about saving a buck on linkages or something here and there I think, is this worth losing my airplane
3. Make sure all connections are tight and as slop free as possible- Turbines don't vibrate much but flight loads can be high and servo or linkage play can lead to premature failure
4. Things can and do go wrong, but make sure everything works properly on the ground, altitude does not solve problems you have on the ground. Binding control surfaces, or hanging up gear won't improve just because you are moving 150 MPH. Too many guys make gear up landings because of avoidable setup issues
5. Be at least two steps ahead of the airplane at all times. Energy management and throttle lag take some getting used to. Jets have to build up momentum, you do not have instant thrust when you advance the throttle stick.
6. Have fun!!!

Welcome to the jet age! It can be a little intimidating at first but it is still just RC flight with a different power source.

Best of luck
Anthony
Thank you for all of the info! I'm currently in the process of looking for a club. More than likely it would be at Georgia Jets. I'm actually going to check them out this weekend and ask about a membership there. I emailed them this morning. Their supposedly one of the best in the country.

As far as gyros go I'll have to look into it a little further. If I can get away with not having one I might go that route, and just get a spektrum 14 channel reciever.
Old 05-17-2023, 07:04 AM
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Just curious how many people are running smoke on their Rebel Pro and where they have place their smoke tube. Inside or the craft or at the end of they thrust tube?
Thanks,
Tone

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