Go Back  RCU Forums > RC Airplanes > RC Jets
Reload this Page >

"Mirce models" F 104 Starfighter in 1:5.3 scale

Notices
RC Jets Discuss RC jets in this forum plus rc turbines and ducted fan power systems

"Mirce models" F 104 Starfighter in 1:5.3 scale

Old 07-16-2023, 04:25 AM
  #1  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default "Mirce models" F 104 Starfighter in 1:5.3 scale

After some time in development in November 2022 "Mirce models" presented F-104 Starfighter in 1:5.3 scale.
This is smaller version of our 1:4 scale F 104...



In the meantime, the model is finished, and this is a story with pictures of how I made it.

The fuselage is in two parts, it is disassembled behind the turbine (nose is also removable).

This model will feature 3D printed parts which will make this build more relaxed, we will offer parts like: nose cone, intakes, rib on the fuselage top, wing leading edges, 3D printed parts for the tip tanks, top of the vertical stabilizer...

Scale landing gears will be made by Carton Alexander.
Transparent canopy will be available from SMT-RC

https://www.nsmodelers.rs/.../f-104-starfighter-15-3-scale
We are opening orders now.
More information on: [email protected]

To be continued...
The following users liked this post:
Daveeast (10-27-2023)
Old 07-17-2023, 03:29 AM
  #2  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

Difference in size between F-104 models in 1:4 & 1:5.3 scale.



A drawing of the 1:5.3 model...




the part of the fuselage where the beginning of the intake duct is, the complete nose, the part of the intake duct where the two inlets join into one and some smaller parts were printed on a 3D printer.








The following users liked this post:
dr.tom (07-17-2023)
Old 07-18-2023, 02:21 AM
  #3  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

The small 1:5.3 scale F 104 Starfighter project started with the wing making.
The wing construction is identical to that of the large model (1:4 scale).

Each "Mirce models" wooden kit is completely constructed in a 3D program, and the parts are cut on a laser cut machine.
The parts are put together like a puzzle, there is no need for paper plans, the kit comes with drawings so you know where each part goes.
As with every "Mirce models" kit, the wing has a template where the ribs are placed, so that the spacing and alignment are perfect.

Always assemble all parts without glue first, so you can see how the assembly process goes.
Some parts are duplicates, they need to be glued before final assembly.
Then take everything apart, apply glue and finally assemble the part you are working on.
Always use white glue!!!

During the construction of the wings, aluminum tubes must be placed in the ribs!!!
Round tube is just for alignment.























The skin is made of 3mm balsa.













Next time bottom side...
The following users liked this post:
Viper1GJ (07-18-2023)
Old 07-18-2023, 11:13 AM
  #4  
tp777fo
My Feedback: (28)
 
tp777fo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Greer, SC
Posts: 3,512
Received 128 Likes on 89 Posts
Default

What is the price of the scale gear?
Old 07-18-2023, 11:55 AM
  #5  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

Please sent email to Alexander, he will give you a right information.
[email protected]

He also make landing gears for our bigger F 104.

Old 07-21-2023, 02:28 AM
  #6  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

After covering the top of the wing with 3mm balsa, I separated the wing from the template and cut off the legs from the underside.

The first step was to determine where the flaps and aileron servos would go.
As always, I used boards with frames that you can get on our website: www.nsmodelers.rs









The next step was to glue the wooden blocks into which the Robart hinges for the aileron would be glued.
On the rear rib, on the inside, nuts for tightening the tanks are glued.





The round aluminum tube was no longer needed, and the square ones were glued to the ribs with 5 mint epoxy glue.
Then the lower formwork.











Making the ailerons and flaps was next on the list...























The leading edges were printed on a 3D printer.







The following users liked this post:
jcterrettaz (07-23-2023)
Old 07-25-2023, 01:36 AM
  #7  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

The horizontal stabilizer was next on the list of parts to build.
Like all other parts, this one has its own template in which the parts are placed for faster and more accurate production.






Like the wings, the horizontal stabilizer was first coated with 3 mm balsa on the upper side, then the structure was separated from the template, the "legs" were cut off and balsa was also glued to the back of the horizontal.



We always try to improve our models a little bit, and crafting is a great opportunity to apply new solutions.
On the large "Mirce models" F-104 model, the horizontal stabilizer rotated via plastic rings. The aluminum tube is fixed to the vertical stabilizer via a screw-in part and plastic rings are slipped on it and glued to the ribs of the horizontal stabilizer.
This time we thought of installing four needle bearings instead of those rings. On the laser cut machine, the parts that enter the construction of the elevator were cut, and the bearings are in those parts.
Through four bearings, the force is evenly distributed over the entire assembly. Of course, everything has to be glued together...















The pictures you have seen are a test before the final gluing, because the part that connects the horizontal and vertical stabilizer must be added to the middle of the aluminum tube.
We made that part in the machine shop.





The vertical stabilizer is designed to withstand all loads.
The rear part of the fuselage will be covered with 160 gr carbon weave for reinforcement.
For now here are a couple of pictures so you can see how the joint of the horizontal and vertical stabilizer looks like.



















After we checked how everything works, cubes with bearings were glued into the horizontal stabilizer...
The leading edges and ends were printed on a 3D printer.








Last edited by mirce; 07-25-2023 at 01:57 AM.
The following users liked this post:
jcterrettaz (07-27-2023)
Old 08-01-2023, 02:24 PM
  #8  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

The fuselage of the F-104 Starfighter in 1:5.3 scale consists of three parts: nose, front and rear.
The production started with the rear part. As already known, all "Mirce models" wooden kits are first completely drawn in a 3D program, and the parts are cut on a laser cut machine.
All the parts are assembled like a puzzle, there is no need for paper plans, with the wooden kit you get drawings on which you can follow where each part goes.
I always recommend that all parts of a particular assembly be assembled without glue first, so you can see the sequence of operations.
I always use white or carpenter's glue!!!

One of the elements of each assembly on the model is the plate template in which all the vertical ribs are placed. This means that the ribs stand firmly and at precisely determined distances.
Some ribs are double and that is the first step that is done.







The next step was to place in the grooves the parts that horizontally connect all the ribs, as well as the ribs that make up the structure of the vertical stabilizer.
There are also double ribs. Each part has its own groove so that they cannot be placed in any other way.
An aluminum tube is also included in the assembly, which gives strength to the upper part of the structure. It will later be shortened to the correct size and glued with five-minute epoxy glue.







The rudder servo is designed this way due to space.











On the back side I made a groove for the cable.
The servo for the horizontal stabilizer is mounted in the classic way with a cover.











On the cover of the servo, a wooden frame is glued, exactly according to the size of the servo motor.
Wooden blocks are glued to it, in which the servo is fixed. The servo must be strong, and this force is not only held by two wooden blocks, but also transmitted to the frame.
As always, the outside of the cubes are additionally reinforced with two small screws!!!

Balsa blocks for three large Robart hinges are glued to the rear vertical rib.
On the front, Martin printed a section that gives a nice transition from the top of the fuselage to the leading edge of the vertical stabilizer.





Next time planking...
Old 08-19-2023, 02:45 PM
  #9  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

The rear part of the fuselage, like the entire model, is planked with 3 mm balsa.

























When I had covered the top side of the rear fuselage part I stopped there, because now that part was strong enough to be separated from the pattern.
But I didn't do that, I started making the front part of the fuselage.
And the front part of the fuselage has its own template for easier and more accurate construction. Of course, it continues on the template from the rear because the fuselage is made in assembly.









The part I was putting together specifically to check all the assemblies was the one where the wings would be attached. There I used aluminum tubes as alignment guides.
For now, all parts are put one in another without glue!!!













The front part of the fuselage is assembled in stages, the front part, the middle part, the one that carries the wings and the rear segment that carries the turbine and rests on the previously made rear part of the fuselage.







To be continued...
Old 09-05-2023, 07:09 AM
  #10  
mirce
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Senta, Serbia
Posts: 1,547
Likes: 0
Received 58 Likes on 29 Posts
Default

When the glue on the middle segment was dry, I glued it on and completed the front part of the fuselage.







The front part of the fuselage has three covers: for the cabin, tank cover and turbine cover.

















The openings on the fuselage ribs are aligned in front of the turbine, as are the left and right intake ducts.
With this, channels can be made very easily from 0.3 mm plastic.

















In order to connect the left and right intake ducts to the central one in front of the turbine, we drew and printed 3D parts that fit precisely.















The following 3 users liked this post by mirce:
BadBill (09-06-2023), Daveeast (10-27-2023), yeahbaby (09-05-2023)

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.