Notices
RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros Discussion all about rc radios, transmitters, receivers, servos, etc.

Need to start from new. After 15 years AWOL

Old 09-01-2018, 04:45 PM
  #26  
Bocajuniors55
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Trabuco canyon, CA
Posts: 20
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Propworn
When you do buy don't get too hung up on what your needs are going to be in the distant future. By the time you get there the latest and greatest that you bought today may just be outdated with fewer bells and whistles than a less expensive radio of the future. That's one reason I picked the Hitec Aurora 9. It was the right price, many users of other brands swear by Hitec servos for their hi end models that in my opinion speaks to the quality. At the time I figured 9 channels was more than I had need for the moment. Years later I have yet to need more than the nine channels or have want for more program features than the radio can provide. The cost of the radio has allowed me to purchase a second Aurora. One for electrics one for combustion powered models. The radios have 32 model memory so there is no lack of space. Quite a few of my models I buddy box so the two identical radios make this a snap. Also if I drop one I have an identical radio for backup. The price made this feasible. I fly gas, nitro, and electric. Everything from indoor to giant scale. I would say everything except jets which have always been beyond what I am willing to spend on an RC model. My preferences are WW1 and WW2 as well as vintage scale models of all sizes and complexity.

In all the years I have used Hitec I have never had a single incident that would cause me to doubt the reliability of the equipment.

Dennis
Thanks for your advice Dennis.
Old 09-01-2018, 04:49 PM
  #27  
Bocajuniors55
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Trabuco canyon, CA
Posts: 20
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Appowner
In the old days the term "Channel" equated to function. How many functions does the model have and can the radio control? Rudder, elevator, ailerons, throttle, flaps, retracts, etc. Today, as mentioned, you can basically tie up 15 Rx connections for a single function. OK! Maybe not that many.

Then of course you put 'A' Rx, complete with a battery in the right wing for those controls. Followed by one Rx in the left for those controls. A third in the tail and finally one up front to handle the throttle, retracts, canopy, telemetry and anything else. The wing Rx's are designated the primary Rx for the wing they're in. But, they connect to the servos on the other side too in the event of a Rx failure. Of course an after market device manages that little function. Ditto for the Rx's in the fuselage. And while the Rx's all have their own batteries, all the servos run off a main power bus from a single, larger battery hidden somewhere in the beast.

Is it no wonder our models have gotten so big? They have to in order to carry all the crap we stuff in them now.
Wow. I have a lot to learn.
Thanks for the info as I'm starting to understand the electrical architecture in these bigger models.
Old 09-02-2018, 12:41 PM
  #28  
Zeeb
My Feedback: (41)
 
Zeeb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: St George, Utah UT
Posts: 5,685
Received 67 Likes on 54 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bocajuniors55
Wow. I have a lot to learn.
Thanks for the info as I'm starting to understand the electrical architecture in these bigger models.
I wouldn't put a lot of stock into what this gentleman has said about setting stuff up with the method he describes. It would add a LOT of weight, many more possible failure points and lots more places for nasty little things like corrosion or wire abrasions to occur. In the years I've been flying and all the model meets I've gone to everything from the Joe Nall to multiple different jet meets and I've never seen anything like he describes.

50% size models are flown with something similar to what I described with the PowerSafe rx's having the advantages of much higher amperage capability for lots of servos as well as telemetry, forward programming and the gyro. They also have dual batteries which is pretty common on 35% size stuff and up with the ability to isolate a battery if it goes bad for some reason as well as the "Fail On" soft switch which takes care of one of the most common failure points in an RC power system; the On/Off switch.

If you haven't done so already, please avail yourself of the huge amount of information available at the RC Groups radio forum;

https://www.rcgroups.com/radios-135/

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.