Notices
RC Radios, Transmitters, Receivers, Servos, gyros Discussion all about rc radios, transmitters, receivers, servos, etc.

most used freq chart?

Old 01-11-2004, 01:54 AM
  #26  
3DFanatic
Senior Member
My Feedback: (5)
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 2,668
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Heh, good one
Old 01-11-2004, 02:08 PM
  #27  
OldRookie
My Feedback: (13)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Prior Lake, MN
Posts: 1,380
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

One factor that can cause some channels to be used more than others goes back to when we got the odd frequencies from the FCC. Before this everyone was on even number channels. Most of the people that were around at this time ( old farts ) seem to stay with the older, even number frequency numbers, instead of changing their equipment.
See how many of your older experienced members are occupying the even number frequencies. These are also the ones that are actually in use more often because these are the people that are usually at the field.

Greg
Old 01-11-2004, 03:07 PM
  #28  
AMA-69405
Senior Member
My Feedback: (22)
 
AMA-69405's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Dexter, KS
Posts: 192
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Greg,

Hmmm.... excellent point. If you look at my data in post #7, the most heavily subscribed channels are definitely biased towards the even numbers. Those channels with 4 or more users represent exactly 100 transmitters, only 33 of which are on odd channels. Probably NOT an accident, and you have most likely hit the nail on the head as to the reason why. Yes, we have quite a few club members that were in the hobby when that transition took place.

Just so I have an excuse for not thinking of this myself I need to point out that although I go way back (note the AMA number), I was inactive during the shift to the current 50 channels. In my first RC life, we had about 6 or 7 channels as I recall; a few on 72 and a couple on 75 MHz.

Thanks for shedding some more light on the subject.

Gary L.
Old 01-11-2004, 04:02 PM
  #29  
RichLockyer
Senior Member
 
RichLockyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Chino, CA
Posts: 154
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

ORIGINAL: strato911
Interesting topic... Perhaps you can explain why lottery numbers drawn in a similarly random method DON'T produce a bell curve.
Lotto draws are equal odds for each number. If probability were perfect, each number would appear the same number of times. Same as flipping a coin. You have two possible outcomes, each with an equal probability. After 10,000 tosses, you will most likely be in the range of 4700-5300 for each result.

With the balls falling through the matrix or frequency selection, we're on the other end of the spectrum since we have more than one factor affecting the outcome. If the balls were to drop through the matrix following strict 50/50, they would all stack up in the center column (and every frequency would have 3.2 users at his club). Since each chance of the ball moving left or right on the pin is an independent 50% chance, it is POSSIBLE, though improbable, that a ball will always move to the right or to the left... and it does happen with predictable regularity.

If one person were to randomly select one each of the 50 frequencies 500 times, he would most likely have a collection of 8-12 crystals of each frequency. Where this formula introduces the bell curve is when you take two (or 160) different people and match them up. You now have odds of 1:50 that person "A" will have a given frequency, and odds of 1:50 that person "B" will have a given frequency. The meshing of these odds is what forms the bell curve. The odds are now 2:100, and that is the subtle difference between 2:100 and (2:100)/2 (or 1:50).

'Scuze me... I need to go tune in my flux capacitor
Old 01-14-2004, 12:19 AM
  #30  
BGR
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Oceanside, CA
Posts: 31
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Recently I have been researching radios because I have been out of the hobby for a number of years and want to get back in. What seems to be the trend for radio equipment is synthesized frequency modules. The transmitter can change to any channel but so far I have only seen one receiver that can do that. The new Polk system even scans to see if someone is on your frequency.

With this technology a club could assign a frequency to each flier when he arrives at the field thus allowing more flight time for everyone. It will take some time for everyone to make the change because no one wants to throw their equipment out, but in time this and other technologies that make the radio equipment more versatile will be the norm.
Old 01-14-2004, 05:42 AM
  #31  
RichLockyer
Senior Member
 
RichLockyer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Chino, CA
Posts: 154
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

ORIGINAL: BGR
The transmitter can change to any channel but so far I have only seen one receiver that can do that.
The Polk system scares me... It can only scan what is currently turned on. Does the pilot have full control over it and can he lock it in? If not, what is to prevent me (with a normal radio) from believing that my channel is clear, only to find that the Polk has decided to use my channel?

Regardless, I'm sure there's a safe workaround.
As for the synth modules, the RX can be changed with a simple crystal swap. I keep reading about low and high band RX, but the only one that can be specified by low/high is Futaba/Great Planes. Airtronics and Hitec appear to make only one. I've never seen an indication or warning on any of my Hitec receivers to remain within 11-35 or 36-60.
Old 01-14-2004, 02:19 PM
  #32  
Jimmbbo
Senior Member
 
Jimmbbo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Fresno, CA
Posts: 1,180
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

When I was getting back into RC, looking for a radio, I went to the club field and looked for the frequency pin that had the least wear and tear.. figured either the pilots on that freq were pretty meticulous or it wasn't used much....

Jim
Old 01-14-2004, 09:09 PM
  #33  
strato911
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: West Jordan, UT
Posts: 1,479
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

ORIGINAL: RichLockyer
The Polk system scares me... It can only scan what is currently turned on. Does the pilot have full control over it and can he lock it in?
As a Tracker II owner, I can assure you the pilot has full control over what frequency is used. It scans to see if your chosen frequency is in use, and if it's clear, then powers up the RC circuit. If it is already in use, it sounds an alarm, and WILL NOT apply power to the RF circuit.

ORIGINAL: RichLockyer
As for the synth modules, the RX can be changed with a simple crystal swap. I keep reading about low and high band RX, but the only one that can be specified by low/high is Futaba/Great Planes.
That's correct. Futaba is the only company still making high & low versions of their receivers. JR stopped about 8 years ago. There are a FEW other synth receivers out there, but they are far more expensive, and must be removed from the plane in order to change channels, because they use a dial (which can wear out) instead of the auto-sensing method the Seeker uses. Also, I think the Seeker is the only synth Rx which also can do BOTH +ve and -ve shift.
Old 01-14-2004, 09:13 PM
  #34  
JohnW
Senior Member
My Feedback: (6)
 
JohnW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Lincoln, NE
Posts: 1,815
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

BGR - Futaba has had synth receivers for years, i.e., the R309DPS for one. I have used these for years... work great. Only drawback is they are a bit pricey. Multiplex has TX's that can scan freqs for traffic.
Old 01-15-2004, 01:26 PM
  #35  
Montague
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Laurel, MD,
Posts: 4,987
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Rich,
There's no reason to be afraid of guys using a synth TX and RX. Having the ability to use any channel does not in any way make anyone exempt from using the frequency control board like everyone else. I never allow my TX to transmit unless I have the pin for that channel. The channel changing ability just allows me to go get a different pin when the field is busy. On slow days at the field, when I have several planes out, it's not uncommon to see my TX have 2 or 3 pins hanging from it (not all my RXs are synth, so those planes stay on one channel). Of course, if I'm sharing with somone, I put the pins back when not in use.
Old 01-15-2004, 01:50 PM
  #36  
Montague
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Laurel, MD,
Posts: 4,987
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Going back to frequency useage, there are some really simple reasons why things stack the way they do, why the even numbers in the 40+ range are the most common.

It's not random, it's historical.

Back right after 72Mhz was introduced, we didn't have all 50 channels right off the bat. Instead, there were some old channels that weren't numbered, they were color coded, like brown/white, blue/white, etc. These channels were widely spaced, and, if I recall, some were on even frequencies that are actually between our current channels.

The decision was made to slowly phase in the "new" numbered channels, with the goal being 50 active channels eventually. First, a handful of the even number channels were phased in, but not near the old channels. This resulted in 12 being legal (I had a radio on 12, what an oddball) , but, if I recall, the rest of the lower end was not allowed quite yet. So the other teens and 20's were not made or sold. In the higher end, only even channels were allowed, so you saw a LOT of 44, 46, 48, 50, 52, etc.

Later, the lower even numbered channels were phased in, and later still, the odd number channels were phased in. (1991 was when the transmitters had to be "narrow band", but I don't recall when the odd channels were phased in, I think it was after 1991, though I'm not sure. I left the hobby around '92 and just came back a few years ago. Before I left, I never saw an odd channel number, but I'm not sure if they were actually allowed at that point or not. I know they were not in 1990)

Add to that the tendancy people have to keep with something that works, and you have guys who started flying in the 80s and early 90s who stayed on their favorate channels, and that's going to keep them on the upper end, even numbers. And, of course, the manufacturers are going to notice as people update and upgrade and replace gear, but want to say on "their" channels, so they are going to sell more stuff on those channels.
Old 01-15-2004, 02:06 PM
  #37  
SDR-Hammer
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: , MI
Posts: 683
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Last spring I started a club frequency use chart to post in the newsletter. Right now we have a participation rate of about 60%, 10 frequencies report no users and several list only one user. Just as OldRookie theorized, about 90% of the zero or one user frequencies are odd numbered.

I heard there is a club in England that assigns frequencies to its members.
Old 01-16-2004, 04:24 AM
  #38  
OldRookie
My Feedback: (13)
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Prior Lake, MN
Posts: 1,380
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

I thought I heard an echo

Greg
Old 01-16-2004, 01:04 PM
  #39  
JPMacG
My Feedback: (2)
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Ivyland, PA
Posts: 2,283
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

Interesting subject.

I'm secretary of my club and have been tasked with keeping track of channel useage so that members know which channels are least used and can change frequencies accordingly.

We have our membership database including channel numbers on Microsoft Access. Does anyone know how to create a plot or table that presents numer of users versus channel number using Access?

Thanks
Old 01-22-2004, 08:05 PM
  #40  
smallrc
 
smallrc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Elkland, MO
Posts: 84
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

I never have to wait for my frequency. I use 53.300 MHz, which is an amateur radio frequency. If you really want to have an <almost> exclusive frequency, just get your entry level amateur radio license and purchase your next radio on the 50/53 MHz band. You'll spend more time flying and less time waiting!

Later... Kenny
Amateur radio call sign WB0VPS
Old 01-23-2004, 12:10 PM
  #41  
smokingcrater
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Up north, ND
Posts: 2,353
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

I'm thinking of going 53 mhz myself, but I've already got a supply of planes/rx's on 72, so I would be stuck running both...

anyway, here is the link that lists licensed users for an area. WOOHOO, nobody on 72 mhz in [link=http://www.cityfreq.com:81/nd/grandforks]my[/link] area, although [link=http://www.cityfreq.com:81/mn/minneapolis]other[/link] areas aren't as lucky.

http://www.cityfreq.com:81/
Old 01-23-2004, 12:14 PM
  #42  
smokingcrater
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Up north, ND
Posts: 2,353
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: most used freq chart?

ORIGINAL: JPMacG
We have our membership database including channel numbers on Microsoft Access. Does anyone know how to create a plot or table that presents numer of users versus channel number using Access?
http://www.geocities.com/calculatorh...histograms.htm

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.