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Pushrod Question

Old 08-14-2011, 12:51 PM
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Tony Gag Jr.
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Default Pushrod Question

I am setting up the pushrods on my Yellow Aircraft Zero and I have a question. I want to use the H9 Titanium Pro Links but they are either a little too long or too short. If I use the longer ones I can get the ailerons at neutral by adjusting the sub trim on the transmitter. Is that a bad idea? Are there other good solid pushrod options that are 4-40 threaded on each end?

Thanks,
Tony
Old 08-14-2011, 03:20 PM
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scale only 4 me
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

You can always use all-thread,, or turnbukles come in many sizes http://www.lunsfordracing.com/mm5/me...gory_Code=TURN

good luck
Old 08-14-2011, 04:38 PM
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butlern
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Tony,

Make them yourself as per Merlyn Graves:

http://www.youtube.com/user/sevarg72.../1/q7qNccIC1qE

His way is really slick, inexpensive (compared to titanium pro-links), and always a perfect fit!

Check out the video and listen to his tips and tricks as you watch.

Noah
Old 08-14-2011, 07:20 PM
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mobyal
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Tony
You can buy 4-40 rods, either 8" or 12", threaded on one end. Measure and cut them to length, and solder a 4-40 metal solder clevis on the unthreaded end, then use a 4-40 threaded metal clevis on the other. I use the soldered clevis on the servo arm, and the threaded clevis on the control surface end. Use a couple of 4-40 jam nuts to lock the threaded clevis once you get it adjusted. Works like a charm, inexpensive, quick and easy to fabricate and install; I use it on all my airplanes and have never had a problem w/ it.
Good luck
Al
Old 08-14-2011, 07:24 PM
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Tony Gag Jr.
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Noah,
That is very cool and super easy! Thanks for that link. Now I just need to find some welding rod.

Thanks,
Tony
Old 08-15-2011, 03:13 AM
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butlern
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Merlyn is the master!

Once you invest in a 4-40 die, and a couple of 1/8 welding rods (which you should be able to pick up in your town), you have an unlimted supply of push rods forever. All-thread rod is weak (never use a piece more than a few inches long), and solder can be brittle if not done properly. Merlyn's method is cheap, easy and most importantly bullet-proof! Be sure to use plenty of cutting oil, and take good care of the die so it remains sharp.

Good luck with your Zero!

Noah
Old 08-15-2011, 09:47 AM
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Tony Gag Jr.
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Noah,
Is the right stuff?

Thanks,
Tony
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Old 08-15-2011, 12:06 PM
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Mk23socom
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

What you are looking for is 1/8" SMAW(Shielded Metal Arc Welding) rod. The two most widely known rods used today by John Q. Public is 6010, commonly referred to as "dirt rod" or "farmer rod", and 7018 Low Hy(drogen). Harbor Freight sells small amounts of either rod as well as some others designed for different applications. I, personally, would find your local welding supply shop and buy a 10lb can of 1/8" 7018. You will be able to outfit a TON of airplanes with pushrods. Bear in mind, the length of those rods is 16" and you will have to knock the flux off the rod before you start the threading operations!. Good luck!

EDIT* another thing I just remembered was GTAW rod. It has no flux, comes in 36" lengths I believe, and you dont have to buy a whole 10# lot of it at one time!.. You would be looking for ER-70S wire.. used for Tig welding.

Old 08-15-2011, 01:13 PM
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Ok, thanks. I guess I bought the wrong stuff.
Old 08-15-2011, 01:35 PM
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Scotsman
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Here is another source of information and supplies for threading welding rod. Definitely the best way to make up just the right length control rods...

http://www.rodchuck.com
Old 08-15-2011, 02:16 PM
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

slick!
Old 08-15-2011, 04:21 PM
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butlern
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

Tony, Good advice above... And be sure to stay away from stainless rod; a "store-bought" 4-40 die will not cut a 1/8" stainless rod (the nickle makes it too hard and too much material needs to be removed using that combo of 4-40 die and 1/8 rod).
Old 08-17-2011, 01:56 AM
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Default RE: Pushrod Question

The Rod-Chuck system uses a #5-40 die as a first cut and then a second cut with a #4-40 die so it removes less metal on each cut prolonging the life of the die and lessening the tendancy to twist off the rod being threaded. Even though they do it that way, I don't think it would cut stainless anyway, but it is a nice trick to lessen the work of each cut.

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