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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 02-11-2012, 01:10 PM
  #6501  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Looking for a winner. THanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.
Old 02-11-2012, 01:34 PM
  #6502  
metaldriver
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

I am going to say the curtiss P-1/F6C hawks which evolved into the P-6 and F11C respectively
Old 02-11-2012, 03:40 PM
  #6503  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: metaldriver

I am going to say the curtiss P-1/F6C hawks which evolved into the P-6 and F11C respectively
Sorry, no. But you aren't as far away as you might imagine. Maybe this will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.
Old 02-11-2012, 04:15 PM
  #6504  
a65l
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

The Boeing F4b / P-12
Old 02-11-2012, 05:07 PM
  #6505  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: a65l

The Boeing F4b / P-12
No Sir; but you aren't far off the mark. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

Old 02-11-2012, 05:19 PM
  #6506  
Mein Duff
 
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Grumman F3F?
Don't think they copied anybodies design though....
Old 02-11-2012, 06:48 PM
  #6507  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: Mein Duff

Grumman F3F?
Don't think they copied anybodies design though....
No, Sorry. But keep trying. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

Old 02-11-2012, 06:50 PM
  #6508  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: Mein Duff

Grumman F3F?
Don't think they copied anybodies design though....
No, Sorry. But keep trying. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

Old 02-11-2012, 08:38 PM
  #6509  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Moving right along. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

Old 02-12-2012, 04:35 AM
  #6510  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

And yet another clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

Old 02-12-2012, 05:50 AM
  #6511  
metaldriver
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

vought ve-7
Old 02-12-2012, 07:09 AM
  #6512  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: metaldriver

vought ve-7

Sorry, but no. Maybe this will help. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.
Old 02-12-2012, 08:35 AM
  #6513  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

A big clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.

(11) The copied plane was a Fokker D. VII
Old 02-12-2012, 10:55 AM
  #6514  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

As the hours dwindle, the clues become more obvious. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.

(11) The copied plane was a Fokker D. VII

(12) The subject aircraft was originally designed to use a Wright-Hispano engine, but was redesigned to use a Curtiss liquid cooled engine.
Old 02-12-2012, 11:23 AM
  #6515  
nutz4planes
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Dehavilland DH-4 redesignated 02B for Marine and Navy service?
Old 02-12-2012, 02:20 PM
  #6516  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: nutz4planes

Dehavilland DH-4 redesignated 02B for Marine and Navy service?
Sorry, nutz4planes. Good guess, but not the one I had in mind. This should do it for you. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.

(11) The copied plane was a Fokker D. VII

(12) The subject aircraft was originally designed to use a Wright-Hispano engine, but was redesigned to use a Curtiss liquid cooled engine.

(13) The company which produced the aircraft was Boeing.
Old 02-12-2012, 03:05 PM
  #6517  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Boeing Model 15?
Old 02-12-2012, 04:14 PM
  #6518  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

Boeing Model 15?
Bingo!! Sir; you have the answer and you are next in line to ask a question. Make it a good one, Sir. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.

(11) The copied plane was a Fokker D. VII

(12) The subject aircraft was originally designed to use a Wright-Hispano engine, but was redesigned to use a Curtiss liquid cooled engine.

(13) The company which produced the aircraft was Boeing.

(14) This Boeing Model was produced after their 14th Model and before their 16th Model.


Answer: The Boeing Model 15


The Boeing Model 15 was a United States open-cockpit biplane single-seat fighter aircraft of the 1920s, manufactured by the Boeing company. The Model 15 saw service with the United States Army Air Service (as the PW-9 series) and with the United States Navy as a carrier-based fighter (as the FB series).

The design of the Model 15 was based on studies of the Fokker D.VII, 142 of which were brought back to the U.S. for evaluation as part of the Armistice Agreement ending World War I. Many of the features were similar. The Model 15 had a fuselage of welded steel tubing braced with piano wire, while the tapered single bay wings were fabric on a wooden frame, with spruce and mahogany wing spars and three-ply wood ribs. Wing struts were changed from the normal wood used in Boeing designs to streamlined steel tubes. The landing gear had a straight axle, streamlined into a small 16 in (410 mm) chord wing.

The original engine was a 300 hp (220 kW) Wright-Hispano, but when the 435 hp (324 kW) liquid-cooled Curtiss D-12 became available the aircraft was redesigned, moving the radiator from the nose to a "tunnel" under the engine. Along with some other minor design changes to the wings, the design was finalized on January 10, 1922.

The Army expressed interest in the new design, and agreed to provide armament, powerplants, and test the aircraft, while leaving Boeing the rights to the aircraft and design. The contract was signed on April 4, 1923 and the first prototype, designated XPW-9 for "Experimental Pursuit, Water-cooled engine", flew on June 2, 1923. The XPW-9 competed with the Curtiss Model 33 for contracts for a pursuit aircraft to replace the Thomas-Morse MB-3A in the United States Army Air Service.

Ultimately, both models were accepted; the Curtiss aircraft was designated PW-8 and the Model 15 PW-9. The Air Service preferred the PW-9, which outperformed the PW-8 in all performance aspects except speed, and was built on a more rugged and easier to maintain design, ordering 113 aircraft (only 25 PW-8s were procured). A naval version was also developed, designated FB, and 42 aircraft produced.

Deliveries of the first 25 PW-9s began on October 30, 1925. Boeing delivered a total of 113 PW-9s of all variants including prototypes to the United States Army Air Corps between 1925 and February 1931. Virtually all PW-9s served with overseas units, in Hawaii with the 5th Composite Group at Luke Field and later the 18th Pursuit Group at Wheeler Field, and in the Philippines with the 4th Composite Group at Clark Field, Luzon. PW-9s equipped the 3rd, 6th, and 19th Pursuit Squadrons between 1925 and 1931.

The FB-1, of which the Navy ordered 16 but received only 10 between December 1 and 22, 1924, was not modified for naval operations (for instance, no arresting hook), and was assigned to Marine Corps squadrons VF-1M, VF-2M, and VF-3M, being deployed to China in support of the Marine Expeditionary Force. Two additional planes—designated FB-2—were altered to operate on the carrier Langley with the addition of arresting gear and a straight-across axle for the landing gear. These went into service with VF-2 in December 1925. Generally satisfactory results led to an order for 27 FB-5s, which became the Navy's first fighters intended specifically for carrier operation. They were upgraded to 525 hp Packard 2A-1500 engines, and sported a row of hooks on the bottom of the axle, used to guide the plane via cables on the deck. The FB-5 first flew October 7, 1926 and was delivered to the Navy beginning in the following January, carried on barges in Puget Sound from Boeing's factory to Langley anchored in Seattle's harbor. Hoisted aboard, their first official flights were from the carrier's deck.
Old 02-12-2012, 04:15 PM
  #6519  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: Ernie P.


ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

Boeing Model 15?
Bingo!! JohnnyS; you have the answer and you are next in line to ask a question. Make it a good one, Sir. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?


Clues:

(1) It served both Army and Navy units.

(2) The design was based upon careful study of an enemy fighter.

(3) Many of the design features of the enemy aircraft were carried over into this design.

(4) The fuselage was welded steel tubing.

(5) The wings were fabric on a wooden frame.

(6) The Navy used the plane for carrier operations.

(7) It was the first successful fighter design by the manufacturer, and had much to do with the manufacturer becoming the huge concern it became.

(8) A trainer version was produced.

(9) The first aircraft delivered to the Navy were not equipped with arrestor hooks, so were utilized by the Marine Corps.

(10) One version supported the Marines in China.

(11) The copied plane was a Fokker D. VII

(12) The subject aircraft was originally designed to use a Wright-Hispano engine, but was redesigned to use a Curtiss liquid cooled engine.

(13) The company which produced the aircraft was Boeing.

(14) This Boeing Model was produced after their 14th Model and before their 16th Model.


Answer: The Boeing Model 15


The Boeing Model 15 was a United States open-cockpit biplane single-seat fighter aircraft of the 1920s, manufactured by the Boeing company. The Model 15 saw service with the United States Army Air Service (as the PW-9 series) and with the United States Navy as a carrier-based fighter (as the FB series).

The design of the Model 15 was based on studies of the Fokker D.VII, 142 of which were brought back to the U.S. for evaluation as part of the Armistice Agreement ending World War I. Many of the features were similar. The Model 15 had a fuselage of welded steel tubing braced with piano wire, while the tapered single bay wings were fabric on a wooden frame, with spruce and mahogany wing spars and three-ply wood ribs. Wing struts were changed from the normal wood used in Boeing designs to streamlined steel tubes. The landing gear had a straight axle, streamlined into a small 16 in (410 mm) chord wing.

The original engine was a 300 hp (220 kW) Wright-Hispano, but when the 435 hp (324 kW) liquid-cooled Curtiss D-12 became available the aircraft was redesigned, moving the radiator from the nose to a ''tunnel'' under the engine. Along with some other minor design changes to the wings, the design was finalized on January 10, 1922.

The Army expressed interest in the new design, and agreed to provide armament, powerplants, and test the aircraft, while leaving Boeing the rights to the aircraft and design. The contract was signed on April 4, 1923 and the first prototype, designated XPW-9 for ''Experimental Pursuit, Water-cooled engine'', flew on June 2, 1923. The XPW-9 competed with the Curtiss Model 33 for contracts for a pursuit aircraft to replace the Thomas-Morse MB-3A in the United States Army Air Service.

Ultimately, both models were accepted; the Curtiss aircraft was designated PW-8 and the Model 15 PW-9. The Air Service preferred the PW-9, which outperformed the PW-8 in all performance aspects except speed, and was built on a more rugged and easier to maintain design, ordering 113 aircraft (only 25 PW-8s were procured). A naval version was also developed, designated FB, and 42 aircraft produced.

Deliveries of the first 25 PW-9s began on October 30, 1925. Boeing delivered a total of 113 PW-9s of all variants including prototypes to the United States Army Air Corps between 1925 and February 1931. Virtually all PW-9s served with overseas units, in Hawaii with the 5th Composite Group at Luke Field and later the 18th Pursuit Group at Wheeler Field, and in the Philippines with the 4th Composite Group at Clark Field, Luzon. PW-9s equipped the 3rd, 6th, and 19th Pursuit Squadrons between 1925 and 1931.

The FB-1, of which the Navy ordered 16 but received only 10 between December 1 and 22, 1924, was not modified for naval operations (for instance, no arresting hook), and was assigned to Marine Corps squadrons VF-1M, VF-2M, and VF-3M, being deployed to China in support of the Marine Expeditionary Force. Two additional planes—designated FB-2—were altered to operate on the carrier Langley with the addition of arresting gear and a straight-across axle for the landing gear. These went into service with VF-2 in December 1925. Generally satisfactory results led to an order for 27 FB-5s, which became the Navy's first fighters intended specifically for carrier operation. They were upgraded to 525 hp Packard 2A-1500 engines, and sported a row of hooks on the bottom of the axle, used to guide the plane via cables on the deck. The FB-5 first flew October 7, 1926 and was delivered to the Navy beginning in the following January, carried on barges in Puget Sound from Boeing's factory to Langley anchored in Seattle's harbor. Hoisted aboard, their first official flights were from the carrier's deck.
Old 02-13-2012, 10:28 PM
  #6520  
JohnnyS
 
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Ernie P.: Thanks!

Clues:

1. It was a twin engine all-weather interceptor that served with NORAD.
2. It was reported to be the first straight-winged jet aircraft to achieve controlled supersonic flight.
Old 02-14-2012, 08:56 AM
  #6521  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

I'm in Thailand for work and ran across these airframe parts at an Army / Navy store. Can anyone ID what aircraft they are from?



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Old 02-16-2012, 07:29 AM
  #6522  
perttime
 
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: JohnnyS

Clues:

1. It was a twin engine all-weather interceptor that served with NORAD.
2. It was reported to be the first straight-winged jet aircraft to achieve controlled supersonic flight.
It's been a while with no posts...

I bet it is something Canadian.
Old 02-16-2012, 07:31 AM
  #6523  
perttime
 
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

ooppssss ... double post.

I'm sure I didn't click the button twice but there was some sort of a hangup.
Old 02-16-2012, 10:26 AM
  #6524  
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Sorry I haven't been posting much the site has been running soo slooowly for me I sort of checked out for a while

the answer to the question would be the AVRO CF100:

Main article: Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck
In 1946, A.V. Roe Canada's next design, the Avro XC-100, Canada's first jet fighter, started at the end of the era of propeller-driven aircraft and the beginning of the jet age.[2] Although the design of the large, jet-powered all-weather interceptor, renamed the CF-100 Canuck, was largely complete by the next year, the factory was not tooled for production until late 1948 due to ongoing repair and maintenance contracts. The CF-100 would have a long gestation period before finally entering RCAF service in 1952, initially with the Mk 2 and Mk 3 variants. The CF-100 Canuck operated under NORAD to protect airspace from Soviet threats such as nuclear-armed bombers during all weather and day/night conditions. Although not designed for speeds over Mach 0.85, it was taken supersonic during a dive by test pilot Janusz Żurakowski in December, 1952.[8]

A small number of CF-100s served with the RCAF until 1981 in reconnaissance, training and electronic warfare (ECM) roles.[2] In its lifetime, a total of 692 CF-100s of different variants, including 53 aircraft for the Belgian Air Force, were produced.
Old 02-17-2012, 06:52 AM
  #6525  
Ernie P.
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Default RE: Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz


ORIGINAL: MajorTomski

Sorry I haven't been posting much the site has been running soo slooowly for me I sort of checked out for a while

the answer to the question would be the AVRO CF100:

Main article: Avro Canada CF-100 Canuck
In 1946, A.V. Roe Canada's next design, the Avro XC-100, Canada's first jet fighter, started at the end of the era of propeller-driven aircraft and the beginning of the jet age.[2] Although the design of the large, jet-powered all-weather interceptor, renamed the CF-100 Canuck, was largely complete by the next year, the factory was not tooled for production until late 1948 due to ongoing repair and maintenance contracts. The CF-100 would have a long gestation period before finally entering RCAF service in 1952, initially with the Mk 2 and Mk 3 variants. The CF-100 Canuck operated under NORAD to protect airspace from Soviet threats such as nuclear-armed bombers during all weather and day/night conditions. Although not designed for speeds over Mach 0.85, it was taken supersonic during a dive by test pilot Janusz Żurakowski in December, 1952.[8]

A small number of CF-100s served with the RCAF until 1981 in reconnaissance, training and electronic warfare (ECM) roles.[2] In its lifetime, a total of 692 CF-100s of different variants, including 53 aircraft for the Belgian Air Force, were produced.
MajorTomski; JohnnyS hasn't been on this site for more than three days. Your answer appears to be correct. Rather than stopping the wheels, why don't you assume your answer is the one he wanted and move forward with your question? Thanks; Ernie P.


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