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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 09-01-2018, 01:13 PM
  #16251  
Ernie P.
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This is proving to be 'way harder than I would have thought. Oh well, we'll press onwards. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station.

21. Gulf of Tonkin.

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.
Old 09-02-2018, 03:31 AM
  #16252  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station.

21. Gulf of Tonkin.

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.

24. He died at the age of 88; having served his country long and well.
Old 09-02-2018, 01:09 PM
  #16253  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station

21. Gulf of Tonkin

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.

24. He died at the age of 88; having served his country long and well.

25. He attended anniversary commemorative events; speaking about the three friends he lost on December 7th, 1941.
Old 09-03-2018, 04:56 AM
  #16254  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station

21. Gulf of Tonkin

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.

24. He died at the age of 88; having served his country long and well.

25. He attended anniversary commemorative events; speaking about the three friends he lost on December 7th, 1941.

26. And when the Japanese surrendered on September 2nd, 1945, he was again flying above the ceremony.
Old 09-03-2018, 10:24 AM
  #16255  
CF105
 
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Finally dug out my copy of The First Team. I'm going to say Fritz Hebel, who led VF-6 into Pearl Harbour after nightfall on Dec. 7.
Old 09-03-2018, 11:03 AM
  #16256  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by CF105 View Post
Finally dug out my copy of The First Team. I'm going to say Fritz Hebel, who led VF-6 into Pearl Harbour after nightfall on Dec. 7.
CF105; you're on the right track. But, Hebel was shot down when he tried to land at Wheeler Field, after being fired on and aborting his landing when his flight tried to land on Ford Island's runway. He died of his injuries the next day. Our subject was the only one of six aircraft who wasn't shot down; and one of three pilots who survived. But here's a bonus clue to help narrow your search. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station

21. Gulf of Tonkin

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.

24. He died at the age of 88; having served his country long and well.

25. He attended anniversary commemorative events; speaking about the three friends he lost on December 7th, 1941.

26. And when the Japanese surrendered on September 2nd, 1945, he was again flying above the ceremony.

27. He was the only man who was both in the air above Pearl Harbor on December 7th; and in the air above the surrender ceremony which concluded WWII.

28. On December 7th, 1941, he was flying off the carrier Enterprise.
Old 09-03-2018, 05:28 PM
  #16257  
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Okay, it had to be Ensign James Daniels III. This comes from an after action report from VF-6:
Launched by Enterprise shortly before 1700 7 December 1941, six Fighting Six Wildcats escorted a strike consisting of 18 Torpedo Six TBDs, and six VB-6 Dauntlesses fitted with smoke generators to mask the TBDs as they approached their targets. Unable to locate an enemy carrier reported to be 100 miles southeast of Enterprise's Task Force 8, the strike returned to the Big E after nightfall. While the VF-6 Wildcats under LT(jg) Francis "Fritz" Hebel were directed to land on Oahu, the remaining planes were allowed to return to Enterprise.

VF-6 approached the Army's Hickam Field, near Pearl Harbor, at about 2110. Though word of the planes' expected arrival had been repeatedly broadcast to all ships and batteries in the area, their appearance triggered a panic, and within seconds the night sky was bright with tracers. ENS Herbert Menges immediately fell victim to the storm of anti-aircraft fire: the first US naval fighter pilot to die in the Pacific War.
LT(jg) Hebel suffered a severe skull fracture ditching his shot-up F4F near Wheeler Field, while LT(jg) Eric Allen bailed out at low altitude over Pearl Harbor, receiving a bullet wound and internal injuries before landing in oily water near the minesweeper Vireo (AM-52). Both men succumbed to their injuries on 8 December.

ENS James Daniels was the only one of the six airmen to land on an airfield proper (Ford Island Naval Air Station). ENS Gayle Hermann set down on a small golf course on Ford Island, while ENS David Flynn's F4F apparently ran out of fuel, forcing him to parachute into a cane field near Barbers Point.

With a loss of three pilots and four aircraft, 7 December 1941 saw VF-6's worst casualties through June 1942.
  • 6-F-1 LT(jg) Francis F. Hebel fractured skull while ditching shot up Wildcat off Barbers Point, died next day
  • 6-F-15 ENS Herbert H. Menges shot down and killed by AA
  • 6-F-5 ENS James G. Daniels III landed on ford Island's airstrip
  • 6-F-12 LT(jg) Eric Allen Jr. received bullet wound and internal injuries, bailed out over Pearl harbor, died next day
  • 3-F-15 ENS Gayle L. Hermann landed on a golf course on Ford Island
  • 6-F-4 ENS David R. Flynn ran out of fuel and bailed out near Barbers Point

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-03-2018 at 05:37 PM.
Old 09-03-2018, 05:41 PM
  #16258  
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And here's an actual report, written by the CAG from the Enterprise:ENTERPRISE AIR GROUPCEAG/A16/Pb/
( 579 )At Sea,
December 15, 1941.From:The Commander Enterprise Air Group.To:The Commanding Officer, U.S.S. EnterpriseSubject:Report of Action with Japanese Air Force at Oahu, T.H., December 7, 1941.Reference:Articles 712 and 874, U.S.N. Regulations.
  1. At 0615 December 7, 1941 I took off from Enterprise, whose position at that time was approximately 215 miles due west of Oahu, with a mission of searching a sector 085°-095° true for a distance of 150 miles, and then to proceed to Ford Island. Ensign P.L. Teaff, USN in airplane 6-S-2 accompanied me. My passenger was Lieut-Comdr. Bromfield Nichol, USN, Tactical Officer attached to the staff of Commander Aircraft, Battle Force, who had been ordered to report to the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet immediately after my arrival at Ford Island.At about 0720 I sighted a tanker to starboard, proceeding on an easterly course, which upon investigation proved to be the Pat Doheny of Los Angeles, belonging to the Richfield Oil Co. Continuing on my track of 090° I sighted and passed the U.S.S. Thresher accompanied by the U.S.S. Litchfield at about 0740. At about 0810 I passed Kaena Point abeam to port distance 20 miles. At 0820 passed Barber's point to seaward and at this time I noticed approximately a squadron of planes circling Ewa Field in column. Believing them to be U.S. Army pursuit planes I gave them a wide berth, decreasing my altitude to about 800 feet and continued toward Ford Island Field. At a point mid-way between Ewa Field and Ford Island I noticed considerable "AA" fire ahead. At almost the same instant I was attacked by Japanese planes from the rear without warning. Recognizing the insignia of one plane that had completed a dive on me -- I immediately dove toward the ground zig-zagging. my passenger did not have sufficient time to man the free gun. My fixed guns were loaded and charged but I had no opportunity to use them. The planes that attacked me appeared to be low-wing monoplane fighters with retractable landing gear. my wing man was attacked at the same time but was not hit and stayed with me, circling low over a cane filed to the North of Pearl City. It was immediately evident that I was under AA fire regardless of which direction I went. I did not have sufficient fuel to return to the ship had I been able to get away from the island. Hoping that I would be recognized as friendly I decided to make a low approach to Ford Island Field and land -- I had no alternative it seemed. From this point on until I had landed I was subjected to heavy AA fire from ships and shore batteries in spite of making recognition maneuvers and the fact that my wheels and flaps were down for landing. My wing man turned away just prior to landing. I could not communicate with the Ford Island Field control tower. I estimate my time of landing to have been about 0835. Inspection of the plane revealed several bullet holes through the wings but no serious damage.


  2. Lt. Comdr. Nichol and I then proceeded and reported to the Commander-in-Chief, Pacific Fleet. I informed him of the position of the Enterprise and our mission.
  3. Shortly after this I witnessed a dive bombing attack on the Navy Yard which appeared to be in the vicinity of Ten-Ten dock and the dry-dock. The attacking planes came in down-sun making shallow dives (about 45°-50°). The average release heighth being about 1000', although in some cases releases were made as low as 300-40 feet, indicating that their bombs were armed the instant they left the rack. Approximately 18 planes participated in this attack, following each other down from the samedirection with a considerable longer interval between drops than is our custom. However the attack was well delivered and none of the planes were seen shot down during their dive. After releasing, their evasive tactics were sound, keeping low and constantly changing course. They were subjected to heavy "AA" fire during the attack. These planes were of a yellowish-silver color, low wing monoplanes, with fixed landing gear and appeared to be similar to the Mitsubishi "Karigane" Mk.II, as illustrated in "Jane's All the World's Aircraft". The bombs appeared to be 500 pounders. My only criticism of this particular attack was that they all came in from the same direction instead of making a divided attack, however the ineffectiveness of our AA fire, lack of air opposition and the manner in which they pressed their attacks home in this particular instance combined to make the attack practically perfect. no further attacks were made.
  4. I was then ordered to report to Commander Patrol Two or Ford Island. Upon ascertaining the number of planes from the Enterprise group that had landed safely at this time (13 planes of VS-6 and VB-6) I was ordered to send 9 planes out to search a section 330°-030° distance 175 miles, and the remaining planes to investigate reports of hostile surface ships and sam-pans south of Barber's Point, and if found, to attack with bombs and gunfire. i then obtained permission to station myself in the Ford Island Field Control Tower in order to be in direct communication with the planes and the Enterprise as a Coast Guard officer was the only officer detailed to duty there. Due to the low-power of the transmitter in the tower I could at no time communicate with either. The lack of proper communication facilities, telephone and radio, were a contributory cause to the loss of 4 airplanes of VF-6, which were shot down by our own AA fire, during the night. I attempted to transmit landing instructions to them via the tower, but they were unable to hear. It was necessary for them to land due to the lack of fuel. Two of the six landed safely. I then attempted to communicate with the Enterprise\ via the tower voice set in order to recommend that no more planes be sent in to Ford Island, without success. I then learned that the remainder of the group that had been launched had returned to the ship.
  5. Lack of information that hostilities had started with Japan, proper communications, the inability of our ground and shipboard forces to recognize friendly planes, or know the proper recognition signals were the contributory causes for the loss of personnel and airplanes of the Enterprise Air Group.
  6. No planes were equipped with self sealing tanks or armor - all guns were fully armed.
  7. The suddenness and magnitude of the enemy attack caused such a stunning effect upon ground and ship personnel that all aircraft were fired upon regardless of their being friendly. I was under fire until my wheels touched the ground on Ford Island - some of the guns being not more than 50 yards distant from me. The importance of some means of positive identification of own airplanes, other than visual signals cannot be over emphasized. The loss of the four fighters of VF-6 that night is a good example of what happens unless proper communications and means of controlling and identifying aircraft in the air is available.
  8. I then received orders to rejoin the Enterprise at sunrise the next morning with our remaining planes. Just prior to the time of our scheduled take-off, a utility plane (JRS) took off, and was immediately fired on by ships and other shore batteries. I had previously arranged that every means available be taken to notify all hands of our scheduled departure and route to be taken to the Enterprise. It was necessary to delay take-off for nearly one hour because of continuous heavy AA fire. At 0625 the remaining Enterprise planes took off, armed with 1000 pound bombs and returned to the ship without further incident.
  9. All personnel of this group conducted themselves in accordance with the highest traditions of the service and under the circumstances did all that they could possibly do.
  10. Lieut. C.E. Dickensen, USN, Scouting Squadron Six, after having been attacked by superior numbers of Japanese planes and under constant AA fire from the ground was forced to bail out, his plane having caught fire. In the midst of the third attack on Pearl Harbor, he made his way to Ford Island Field and immediately upon arrival there manned another plane and participated in the 17t mile search flight. At this time his ordeal of having been shot down was not known to his superiors and no mention of the same was made by him to anyone at the time, he thus displaying a superb courage, stamina, devotion to duty, unexcelled logic and coolness in action. it is requested that this officer be given an official commendation for his performance of duty.
[signed]
H.L.YOUNG.
Old 09-03-2018, 07:07 PM
  #16259  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Okay, it had to be Ensign James Daniels III.
Hydro Junkie; I'll accept that answer. You now have the conch shell and we're all waiting for your next question. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.

2. His first combat mission was very nearly his last.

3. He was the only member of his flight to avoid being shot down on that memorable day.

4. Three pilots survived; and three died.

5. And in coming years he was haunted by the three that died; often talking about how they died.

6. He flew through the entire war.

7. From the very first day to the very last day.

8. Ironically enough, both battleships and aircraft carriers feature prominently in his wartime career.

9. On the first day and the last day of his war.

10. He was not an ace pilot.

11. Although he did fly fighters.

12. For the entire war.

13. In fact, after a bit of study, I can’t find any indication he ever shot down an enemy plane.

14. He is remembered simply because of the first and last days; and because he was there.

15. He flew in more than one war.

16. In fact, he fought in three different wars.

17. He started his first war as a fighter pilot; and ended it the same way.

18. He finished his career as Commander of an aircraft carrier.

19. In between the two, he flew combat missions in another war.

20. Yankee Station

21. Gulf of Tonkin

22. He was born in Missouri.

23. In 1915.

24. He died at the age of 88; having served his country long and well.

25. He attended anniversary commemorative events; speaking about the three friends he lost on December 7th, 1941.

26. And when the Japanese surrendered on September 2nd, 1945, he was again flying above the ceremony.

27. He was the only man who was both in the air above Pearl Harbor on December 7th; and in the air above the surrender ceremony which concluded WWII.

28. On December 7th, 1941, he was flying off the carrier Enterprise.

29. And flew off the XXX on September 2nd, 1945.

30. He flew combat missions in Korea.

31. And he commanded the Ticonderoga off the coast of Viet Nam.











Answer: U.S. Navy Captain James G. Daniels III The night of Dec. 7, 1941, was cold and rainy. Personnel on Ford Island still huddled in ditches, makeshift shelters or hangars, waiting for the Japanese Navy to come back and finish the job. But there was more death to come that night. A hundred miles from Hawaii, an Enterprise air-search force was returning near dusk after failing to find the Japanese fleet. With light fading and aircraft short of fuel, Enterprise sent six F4F Wildcat fighters to instead land on Ford Island’s runway. All were members of carrier fighter squadron VF-6. In minutes, five aircraft were shot down, with three of the pilots killed — all by friendly fire.

With LT(jg) Francis F. “Fritz” Hebel in the lead, the flight approached a blacked-out Oahu, the only light coming from fires of the morning attack. Wingman ENS Herbert H. Menges flew alongside Hebel. Following were ENS Gayle L. Hermann and ENS David R. Flynn and a final pair consisting of ENS James G. Daniels III and LT(jg) Eric Allen, Jr. On Ford Island, Enterprise CAG LCDR Howard L. “Brigham” Young had flown in on an SBD scout bomber earlier in the day, into the middle of the attack. He was able to land on Ford Island’s runway and sprint to the control tower. There, he tried to contact Enterprise, but the tower’s weak radio signal could not reach the carrier. Young climbed back into his SBD’s back seat to use the aircraft’s radio, communicating with Enterprise to apprise Admiral Halsey of the situation. That evening, Enterprise notified Ford Island six aircraft from VF-6 would be landing. Young and other personnel sent out the word to hold fire, and then Young waited in the control tower for the Wildcats. Around 2100 hours, the flight finally arrived. They had flown nearly to the east end of Oahu’s southern shore before determining where they were. They turned around and approached Ford Island from the south, passing over Hickam Field. Hebel radioed that they would make a circuit around the island, landing from the north. Young in the control tower told them to come straight in, but Hebel either could not hear Young or decided to ignore him. Hebel repeated he was making a pass, and Young, once again, tried to get him to fly straight in. As the flight passed by Ford Island, a few scattered shots were fired and then the floodgates opened. Although the word had gone out that the Wildcats were coming, every gun on the island seemed to open up. The museum’s own Dick Girocco, who was in Hangar 56, said the “sky was lit up like daytime” and the sound was deafening. Everyone in the flight realized they were in trouble. Flight leader Hebel was able to break away from the carnage and make for Wheeler Field, but when he arrived, he was greeted with another barrage. His aircraft crashed; Hebel died of head injuries the next morning. Hebel’s wingman Menges crashed into the Palms Hotel near the Pearl City Tavern. No one in the hotel was injured, but Menges died instantly in the crash. He became the first Navy fighter pilot to die in the war. Hermann was hit 18 times as he tried to escape. His flight came to an abrupt end when a 5-inch naval shell hit his engine. The shell failed to explode, but it knocked the engine out of the plane. The Wildcat fluttered down tail-first to crash on the Ford Island golf course, near where the ADM Clarey Bridge today touches the island. Incredibly, he was uninjured. He picked up his parachute and began walking down the runway to the seaplane base at the other end of the island. The excitement, however, was not over for Herrmann. Flying next to Hermann was Flynn, who was able to break away from Ford Island’s crossfire. He headed toward Barbers Point, but had to bail out, landing in a cane field. Army security personnel tried to shoot him, imagining he was a Japanese paratrooper. Flynn’s cursing convinced them otherwise. Allen was hit immediately. He bailed out, but was hit by a .50-caliber shell on the way down, his parachute only partially opened. Allen swam through oily water to minesweeper Vireo (AM-52), but died of severe wounds the next day. Daniels was the only pilot left in the air. He turned off his external lights, dove to the water past the end of the seaplane base and continued down the channel. Although Daniels had survived, he still needed to land safely. At that point, Young was able to reach him from the control tower. However, Young was not convinced that the flyer was an American, and Daniels was becoming concerned that the Japanese had seized the island. Young demanded to know who was there. Daniels answered with his aircraft identification, Six Fox Five (VF-6 squadron, aircraft 5). Daniels then said that he recognized Young’s voice. Young asked Daniels to give Young’s nickname. Daniels replied, “Brigham,” so Young ordered the Wildcat pilot to put his wheels down and come in low and fast. The approach was filled with hazards. Coming up the channel, he almost hit battleship Nevada, and the Wildcat was going so fast that he only got his flaps halfway down before landing. Daniels reached the end of the runway and was about to shoot into the weeds but was able to ground loop the aircraft. He taxied down the runway to the control tower — and into more danger. As Daniels neared the tower, a seaman manning a .50 caliber machine gun let loose at the Wildcat. Fortunately, Hermann had reached the area; he grabbed a rifle and hit the machine gunner in the head with the butt. In a few, endless minutes of terror, three pilots had died and five aircraft had been destroyed. Only Daniels had safely reached the Ford Island runway. VF-6’s losses that night would not be exceeded until the Battle of Midway. Ironically, Hermann would die a few days before that historic battle in a take-off accident.

Capt. Daniels, Pearl Harbor

Daniels became the only pilot in the air at both the Pearl Harbor attack and the Japanese surrender. He flew 110 combat missions in World War II and Korea, and commanded the carrier Ticonderoga off the coast of Vietnam during the early days of that war. Pilot
Aircraft
Outcome
LT(jg) Francis F. Hebel6-F-1
Died of injuries
ENS Herbert H. Menges6-F-15
Killed
ENS James G. Daniels III6-F-5
Landed safely, uninjuredLT(jg) Eric Allen Jr.6-F-12
Died of injuries
ENS Gayle L. Hermann
3-F-15
Shot out of air, survived without serious injuryENS David R. Flynn
6-F-4
Shot down, survived without serious injury Pearl Harbor pilot James G. Daniels III dies at 88By Mike Gordon
Advertiser Staff Writer
He was the last surviving pilot who could tell the tale, the only one who had landed safely when the sky above Pearl Harbor erupted the night of Dec. 7, 1941, with friendly fire. At anniversary ceremonies, he would honor the memory of the pilots killed in the fusillade — all of them good friends — by telling their story. But time caught up with retired Navy Capt. James G. Daniels III. He died Monday. He was 88.Daniels was born in Missouri in 1915. He was a veteran of three wars and flew 120 combat missions. He commanded the aircraft carrier USS Ticonderoga off the coast of Vietnam. A Captain in the United States Navy at the outbreak America's particiaption of World War II. he was the only pilot in the air when war was delcared on Japan and in the air near Tokyo Bay when Japan surrended to General Douglas MacArthur aboard the USS Missouri. On December 7, 1941 Captain Daniels was launched from the first USS Enterprise in his F4F-3A Wildcat Fighter along with others to search for the retreating Japanese attack fleet; after terminating the search they were returning to the aircraft carrier and six, including Daniels, were directed to land at the Ford Island airstrip. Panicky sailors on the ground, although advised that friendly United States planes would be incoming, released a barrage of rounds at the six approaching planes. Daniels survived the deluge of friendly fire and landed his aircraft at Ford Island as directed. Almost four years later he was also in the air above Tokyo Harbor in the war's final days in September 1945 when Japan surrendered. A graduate of George Washington University and, later in his career, the Naval War College, he had been assigned to Hawaii upon graduating from the Navy's flight school in 1939. He rose to the rank of Captain and retired in 1970 after 33 years of service during which he had logged 4,500 hours in the air, mostly flying off aircraft carriers. He flew 110 combat missions during World War II and Korea and earned numerous decorations including the Legion of Merit with Gold Star and Combat V, Distinguished Flying Cross and six Air Medals. Died of natural causes.
Old 09-03-2018, 07:44 PM
  #16260  
Hydro Junkie
 
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Okay, after that brain twister, I'll see what I can come up with. Whatever it is, it will have to be easier than that one. I find it hard to believe I got the Tico right but the CO wrong, by one no less.
Old 09-04-2018, 01:37 AM
  #16261  
Ernie P.
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Hydro Junkie; this is going to be tough, I can tell. You already have me puzzled and you haven't even asked a question, yet. You said "I find it hard to believe I got the Tico right but the CO wrong, by one no less.". What do those acronyms mean? Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-04-2018, 05:02 AM
  #16262  
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Tico is a Navy abbreviation to the name Ticonderoga. In the same manner, Both Saratoga's were referred to as "Sara", both Lexington's were referred to as "The Lady Lex" or just "Lex", the second Independence was the "Indy", etc. It was something that actually started with the Lexington class carriers. Since they were almost identical, the Navy had to do some thing to make identification easier. Prior to WWII, the Lexington had a black stripe painted around the top of the funnel while the Saratoga had a vertical stripe. To help out the aircrews, Lex and Sara were painted on the aft end of the flight deck in large letters. This tradition carried on during and after WWII with the hull number being painted on the forward(and for a time during the war, aft) end of the flight deck and on the sides of the island. With all that said, not all carriers had that kind of nick name. The Enterprise was nick named "The Big E", Intrepid was "The Evil I" and, to add a little confusion, the second Lexington was also referred to as "The Blue Ghost". Anyway, below is a picture of the first carrier Saratoga showing both it's identifying markings.
Click image for larger version

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As far as the abbreviation CO, that's just the shorthand version of Commanding Officer. XO would be the Executive Officer, EO is the Engineering Officer, CAG would be the Commander, Air Group, etc. Back in WWII, it was common for everyone I just listed to be a Commander, other than the CO who was always a Captain on any ship larger than a destroyer. In the modern Navy, every one of those listed would be a Captain, as well as the Air Boss. By the time you add the admiral's staff, there could be as many as 7 captains aboard a modern carrier while it's deployed. Now, as to my comment about missing by one, "Captain" Daniels was relieved by Captain Weinel on July 20, 1963, 378 days after taking command on July 13, 1962.
Hope I didn't screw you up too much and that I helped your understanding of naval jargon

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-04-2018 at 06:16 AM.
Old 09-04-2018, 05:41 AM
  #16263  
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Okay guys, I got one.
Looking for a plane this time:
1) This plane was single engined
2) Less than a dozen were built
3) This plane was actually used by the military of it's country of origin
Good Luck
Old 09-04-2018, 10:24 AM
  #16264  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Tico is a Navy abbreviation to the name Ticonderoga. In the same manner, Both Saratoga's were referred to as "Sara", both Lexington's were referred to as "The Lady Lex" or just "Lex", the second Independence was the "Indy", etc. It was something that actually started with the Lexington class carriers. Since they were almost identical, the Navy had to do some thing to make identification easier. Prior to WWII, the Lexington had a black stripe painted around the top of the funnel while the Saratoga had a vertical stripe. To help out the aircrews, Lex and Sara were painted on the aft end of the flight deck in large letters. This tradition carried on during and after WWII with the hull number being painted on the forward(and for a time during the war, aft) end of the flight deck and on the sides of the island. With all that said, not all carriers had that kind of nick name. The Enterprise was nick named "The Big E", Intrepid was "The Evil I" and, to add a little confusion, the second Lexington was also referred to as "The Blue Ghost". Anyway, below is a picture of the first carrier Saratoga showing both it's identifying markings.
Attachment 2261841
As far as the abbreviation CO, that's just the shorthand version of Commanding Officer. XO would be the Executive Officer, EO is the Engineering Officer, CAG would be the Commander, Air Group, etc. Back in WWII, it was common for everyone I just listed to be a Commander, other than the CO who was always a Captain on any ship larger than a destroyer. In the modern Navy, every one of those listed would be a Captain, as well as the Air Boss. By the time you add the admiral's staff, there could be as many as 7 captains aboard a modern carrier while it's deployed. Now, as to my comment about missing by one, "Captain" Daniels was relieved by Captain Weinel on July 20, 1963, 378 days after taking command on July 13, 1962.
Hope I didn't screw you up too much and that I helped your understanding of naval jargon
It was "Tico" that puzzled me. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-04-2018, 05:29 PM
  #16265  
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NO guesses yet, so that means it's clue time.
Looking for a plane this time:
1) This plane was single engined
2) Less than a dozen were built
3) This plane was actually used by the military of it's country of origin
4) This plane was only based two places
5) To fly this plane, the pilots had to learn a specific skill that wasn't easy to perform
Good Luck
Old 09-04-2018, 05:40 PM
  #16266  
elmshoot
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Some sort of German Helicopter
Old 09-05-2018, 04:33 AM
  #16267  
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Nope, not a chopper. I guess that means it's time for another clue.
Looking for a plane this time:
1) This plane was single engined
2) Less than a dozen were built
3) This plane was actually used by the military of it's country of origin
4) This plane was only based two places
5) To fly this plane, the pilots had to learn a specific skill that wasn't easy to perform
6) This plane was a single seater
7) While this was an active duty aircraft, it never saw combat
8) While this plane was not secret, it's use was considered "secretive" by the military brass
9) Due to bad luck, it's service life was only a few years
Good Luck

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-05-2018 at 08:59 AM.
Old 09-05-2018, 07:53 AM
  #16268  
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f-117?
Old 09-05-2018, 07:58 AM
  #16269  
FlyerInOKC
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Originally Posted by CF105 View Post
f-117?
Can't be the F-117 had twin engines.
Old 09-05-2018, 08:16 AM
  #16270  
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Nope, not the F-117. Besides, the F117 was in service for over a decade even though most of us didn't know it. Our plane in question was much less than that
UPDATE:
The F-117 first flew on June 8, 1981, under cover of darkness. It was retired in 2008, meaning it was in service for roughly 25 years.

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-05-2018 at 08:55 AM.
Old 09-05-2018, 08:59 AM
  #16271  
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Since I received an incorrect guess, it's time to add another clue.
Looking for a plane this time:
1) This plane was single engined
2) Less than a dozen were built
3) This plane was actually used by the military of it's country of origin
4) This plane was only based two places
5) To fly this plane, the pilots had to learn a specific skill that wasn't easy to perform
6) This plane was a single seater
7) While this was an active duty aircraft, it never saw combat
8) While this plane was not secret, it's use was considered "secretive" by the military brass
9) Due to bad luck, it's service life was only a few years
10) That service life was only 4 to 5 years
11) This plane was armed with twin 30 caliber machine guns
Good Luck
Old 09-05-2018, 09:38 AM
  #16272  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Since I received an incorrect guess, it's time to add another clue.
Looking for a plane this time:
1) This plane was single engined
2) Less than a dozen were built
3) This plane was actually used by the military of it's country of origin
4) This plane was only based two places
5) To fly this plane, the pilots had to learn a specific skill that wasn't easy to perform
6) This plane was a single seater
7) While this was an active duty aircraft, it never saw combat
8) While this plane was not secret, it's use was considered "secretive" by the military brass
9) Due to bad luck, it's service life was only a few years
10) That service life was only 4 to 5 years
11) This plane was armed with twin 30 caliber machine guns
Good Luck
Well, the last clue blew my first guess away, but how about the Sparrowhawk? Thanks; Ernie P.

Answer: The Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk

The Curtiss F9C Sparrowhawk is a light 1930s biplanefighter aircraft that was carried by the United States NavyairshipsUSS Akron and Macon. It is an example of a parasite fighter, a small airplane designed to be deployed from a larger aircraft such as an airship or bomber.
Design and development



On 20 August 1929, off the coast of New Jersey, a biplane hooked itself to the bottom of a dirigible and was carried along by the larger craft. This is the 2nd such incident. The “snapon, snapoff” experiment is accomplished by the Navy airship USS Los Angeles, under Lt. Com. Herbert Wiley, and a Navy biplane. The biplane, regulating its speed to that of the dirigible, flew close under the Los Angeles. A large hook had been attached to the middle of the top wing of the biplane, and from the bottom of the Los Angeles hung a U-shaped yoke. Maneuvering the ship under the dirigible, the plane pilot slipped the hook into the Los Angeles’ yoke and for 3 or 4 minutes the dirigible carried the biplane. The plane pilot, by a cord arrangement in his cabin, withdrew the hook from the yoke and flew clear of the dirigible.

Although designed as a pursuit plane or fighter, the Sparrowhawk's primary duty in service was reconnaissance, enabling the airships it served to search a much wider area of ocean. The Sparrowhawk was primarily chosen for service aboard the large rigid-framed airships Akron and Macon because of its small size (20.2 ft (6.2 m) long and with only a 25.5 ft (7.8 m) wingspan), though its weight, handling and range characteristics, and also downward visibility from the cockpit, were not ideal for its reconnaissance role. The theoretical maximum capacity of the airships' hangar was five aircraft, one in each hangar bay and one stored on the trapeze but, in the Akron, two structural girders obstructed the after two hangar bays, limiting her to a maximum complement of three Sparrowhawks. A modification to remove this limitation was pending at the time of the airship's loss. Macon had no such limitation and she routinely carried four airplanes.

To achieve launching and recovery from the airship in flight, a 'skyhook' system was developed. The Sparrowhawk had a hook mounted above its top wing that attached to the cross-bar of a trapeze mounted on the carrier airship. For launching, the biplane's hook was engaged on the trapeze inside the airship's (internal) hangar, the trapeze was lowered clear of the hull into the (moving) airship's slipstream and, engine running, the Sparrowhawk would then disengage its hook and fall away from the airship. For recovery, the biplane would fly underneath its mother ship, until beneath the trapeze, climb up from below, and hook onto the cross-bar. The width of the trapeze cross-bar allowed a certain lateral lee-way in approach, the biplane's hook mounting had a guide rail to provide protection for the turning propeller (see photo), and engagement of the hook was automatic on positive contact between hook and trapeze. More than one attempt might have to be made before a successful engagement was achieved, for example in gusty conditions. Once the Sparrowhawk was securely caught, it could then be hoisted by the trapeze back within the airship's hull, the engine being cut as it passed the hangar door. Although seemingly a tricky maneuver, pilots soon learned the technique and it was described as being much easier than landing on a moving, pitching and rolling aircraft carrier. Almost inevitably, the pilots soon acquired the epithet "The men on the Flying Trapeze" and their aircraft were decorated with appropriate unit emblems.

Once the system was fully developed, in order to increase their scouting endurance while the airship was on over-water operations, the Sparrowhawks would have their landing gear removed and replaced by a fuel tank. When the airship was returning to base, the biplanes' landing gear would be replaced so that they could land independently again.

For much of their service with the airships, the Sparrowhawks' effectiveness was greatly hampered by their poor radio equipment, and they were effectively limited to remaining within sight of the airship. However, in 1934 new direction-finding sets and new voice radios were fitted which allowed operations beyond visual range, exploiting the extended range offered by the belly fuel tanks and allowing the more vulnerable mother ship to stay clear of trouble. One interesting use of the Sparrowhawks was to act as 'flying ballast'. The airship could take off with additional ballast or fuel aboard instead of its airplanes. Once the airship was cruising, the aircraft would be flown aboard, the additional weight being supported by dynamic lift until the airship lightened.
Specifications (F9C-2)



Data from The Airships Akron & Macon: Flying Aircraft carriers of the United States Navy

General characteristics



· Crew: 1· Length: 20 ft 2.0 in (6.147 m)· Wingspan: 25 ft 6.0 in (7.772 m)· Height: 10 ft 6 in (3.2 m)· Wing area: 172.79 sq ft (16.053 m2)· Empty weight: 2,089 lb (948 kg)· Gross weight: 2,776 lb (1,259 kg)· Powerplant: 1 × Wright R-975-E3 9-cyl. air-cooled radial piston engine, 438 hp (327 kW)



Performance· Maximum speed: 176.5 mph (284 km/h; 153 kn) · Range: 297 mi (258 nmi; 478 km) · Service ceiling: 19,200 ft (5,900 m) · Rate of climb: 1,700 ft/min (8.6 m/s) · Wing loading: 16 lb/sq ft (78 kg/m2) · Power/mass: 0.086 hp/lb (0.259 kW/kg)



Armament· Guns: 2 × .30 in (7.62 mm) Browning machine guns
Old 09-05-2018, 11:23 AM
  #16273  
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Okay Ernie, what was your first guess?
Hate to say it but Ernie got it AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I figured it would be harder than that, considering there was only 7 planes built and 4 of those are presently on the bottom of the Pacific off the California coast. A single Sparrowhawk example survived history and is on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington, D.C. and represents an example to have served at one time with USS Macon.
Old 09-05-2018, 03:10 PM
  #16274  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Okay Ernie, what was your first guess?
Hate to say it but Ernie got it AGAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I figured it would be harder than that, considering there was only 7 planes built and 4 of those are presently on the bottom of the Pacific off the California coast. A single Sparrowhawk example survived history and is on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington, D.C. and represents an example to have served at one time with USS Macon.
Yeah, I'm going to have to sit back a bit more often; but I love taking the early and long shots. My first thought was the Blohm & Voss Bv 40; but that had two 30 mm Cannons. So, the Sparrowhawk. It was a good question though; and it should have run a bit longer. Okay; let's see if this one is easier than the last. Thanks; Ernie P.


We all know German pilot Adolph Galland wrote a famous book “The First and the Last”. This question is about another pilot; one who can also claim to be The First and the Last.

What warbird aircrew member do I describe?

1. This pilot flew more than 100 combat missions.
Old 09-05-2018, 04:01 PM
  #16275  
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Col. Klink? Famous Stuka pilot on TV!

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