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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 09-09-2018, 09:34 AM
  #16301  
Top_Gunn
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Good guess, but not the pilot I'm looking for. Here's the bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)
Old 09-09-2018, 02:08 PM
  #16302  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Good guess, but not the pilot I'm looking for. Here's the bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)
Well, how about Lieutenant Bruce Carr? Thanks; Ernie P.


Downed far behind enemy lines, an American P-51 pilot made a dramatic escape with the unintended help of the Luftwaffe. Bruce Carr ended World War II as a lieutenant with 14 victories confirmed and the Distinguished Service Cross. Despite all that, he denies any claim to heroism--a doubtful assertion--but he can't disclaim his role in a daring experience, to our knowledge unique in the history of that war. Bruce Carr was a P-51 pilot with the 354th Fighter Group. At the time of this adventure, the group was based in France. In October 1944, while on a mission over Czechoslovakia, he was downed by flak. After days of evading--cold, hungry, and physically exhausted--he decided it was better to turn himself in to the Luftwaffe than to risk capture by the locals. He knew from the surrounding air activity that there was a German airfield not far away.

Lieutenant Carr found his way to the field and hid in the forest outside a fence surrounding a revetment in the woods. An FW-190 was parked there; its ground crew was completing servicing the aircraft. It was full of fuel and ready to go. Carr's plan of surrender took a 180-degree turn to the positive side. Maybe he could "borrow" the enemy fighter and fly back to his base in France. If he were caught tinkering with the bird, things would not go well, but it was worth a shot. As dusk fell, Carr slipped through the fence and climbed into the FW-190. In the failing light, he did his best to familiarize himself with the cockpit and get ready for a takeoff at dawn. All switches and gauges were labeled in German, hence of no help. Then by the gray light of dawn, the young lieutenant found the switches for gear and flaps. Now to start the engine and get on his way before the ground crew arrived to preflight the bird. To the right of the seat was a handle that he guessed might have something to do with starting the engine. Already there were sounds of activity on the field, so he didn't have much time for experimenting. Cautiously, Carr pulled the handle. Nothing happened. He tried pushing it. He was rewarded by the sound of an inertial starter winding up. Pulling the handle must engage the starter, he guessed. He cracked the throttle, wound up the starter, and pulled. The engine came to life with a roar. Taxiing through the woods with no parachute, helmet, or radio, he could see a green field ahead and no signs of unfriendly reaction. Carr firewalled the throttle, then roared across the field and into the air, leveling off at treetop altitude. He saw no sign of pursuit as he headed for home. Flying the fighter was no problem. An airplane is an airplane, as they say. He didn't have time to consider what would happen at the field when the Germans discovered one of their planes was missing. All went well until he reached the front lines. Every armed Allied soldier in range opened fire on him. There was little Lieutenant Carr could do in the way of evasive action since he was blowing leaves off the tops of trees, but his luck held. No hits Another problem lay ahead: the likelihood of being shot down by his own airfield defenses. Without a radio, he had no way of assuring them that this was a friendly FW-190. It was best to get on the ground as fast as possible. He came screaming in on the deck, pulled up, rolled over on his back, reefed it in for a short approach, dropped flaps, and pushed the button he thought would lower the landing gear. There was no reassuring thump of gear coming down. As he pulled up for another try, he could see the AA crews uncovering their 40-mm guns. With no parachute, his only option for avoiding another encounter with flak was to belly in. This he did without injury. As the FW-190 ground to a stop, Lieutenant Carr was surrounded by MPs, whom he could not convince that he was a 354th pilot on a delayed return from a mission. Things grew more and more tense until the group commander, Col. George Bickell, arrived and stuck his head into the cockpit. His first words were, "Carr, where in hell have you been?"

After his extraordinary experience, Bruce Carr was back on operations in a few days. By April 15, he was credited with 7.5 more victories, five on one mission, putting him among the top 50 World War II AAF fighter aces. Today, retired Colonel Carr flies a P-51 owned by Dr. Joseph Newsome--but, he says, a little more conservatively than in years gone by. And with the consent of the owner.
Old 09-09-2018, 02:22 PM
  #16303  
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Another good guess, Ernie, but still not the pilot I'm looking for. Here's another bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.
Old 09-09-2018, 05:08 PM
  #16304  
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Bob Hoover?
He did something similar to Carr. In fact I didn't know others had replicated his feat until reading this story.
Sparky
Old 09-10-2018, 04:57 AM
  #16305  
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Not Bob Hoover. The escape is not the achievement mentioned in clue 2. And it's not the feat referred to in clue 3.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.
Old 09-10-2018, 05:17 AM
  #16306  
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Chuck Yeager, breaking the speed of sound in a Mustang and not crashing
Old 09-10-2018, 05:42 AM
  #16307  
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Well, I know Yeager has said he thought he'd broken the sound barrier in a Mustang, but I don't think any supersonic flight in a piston-engine plane has ever been confirmed. In any event, he's not the pilot I'm looking for. But here's another clue, which may give it away.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.
Old 09-10-2018, 07:15 AM
  #16308  
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Not sure with the Mustang but I do know some P-38 pilots had issues pulling out of dives when they reached the supersonic thresh-hold due to compression around the control surfaces. It wasn't until the F-86 was reworked with a full "flying horizontal stabilizer that planes would RELIABLY recover from dives in the trans-sonic to supersonic speed ranges

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-10-2018 at 07:18 AM.
Old 09-10-2018, 08:37 AM
  #16309  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
Not sure with the Mustang but I do know some P-38 pilots had issues pulling out of dives when they reached the supersonic thresh-hold due to compression around the control surfaces. It wasn't until the F-86 was reworked with a full "flying horizontal stabilizer that planes would RELIABLY recover from dives in the trans-sonic to supersonic speed ranges
You are correct about the P-38 they had a bad compression stall due to the increased lift from the tail. You had to slow it down to be able to pull out. One test pilot reported he was able to recover by using the trim tab. Lockheed designed a dive flap to alleviate the problem but it didn't hit production until the J model.
Old 09-10-2018, 03:44 PM
  #16310  
elmshoot
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Compresibility encountered at transsonic speed, (not compression stall) are the issues cited above. The Mustang and other propeller driven airplanes could reach transsonic speeds but none ever exceeded the speed of sound as it is normally recognized.
Yes there are parts of the airplane that had supersonic airflow around it but not the entire airplane.
We had arguments in the Intruder community that some claimed the Intruder went supersonic as attested by the airspeed and Mach indicator. I always maintained that it wasn't likely that the plane would go supersonic and it was more likely a pitot static and air data computer inaccuracy. Finally the Intruder test pilot who flew the preliminary test flights (Chuck Sewell) with the calibrated airspeed boom on the nose of the plane stated unequivocally that he had the plane straight down at full power and it would not go supersonic.
Now the Prowler would in fact go supersonic and I did it many times the only limitation was that you couldn't have anything mounted on the pylons. Mach tuck was noticeable as you slipped supersonic......Max airspeed LBA (limited by airframe) for both planes.

SWAG Winkle Brown?
Sparky

Last edited by elmshoot; 09-10-2018 at 05:55 PM.
Old 09-11-2018, 04:30 AM
  #16311  
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Not Brown, though Brown would make a really good subject. Here's today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.
Old 09-11-2018, 05:03 AM
  #16312  
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How about Roy Brown, the pilot that supposedly shot down "The Red Baron"
Old 09-11-2018, 05:15 AM
  #16313  
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Joseph Meyers who shot down the first jet fighter?
Old 09-11-2018, 06:15 AM
  #16314  
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Neither Roy Brown nor Myers. Here's the bonus clue (I know. it should be two, but I'm running short).

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.
Old 09-11-2018, 06:44 AM
  #16315  
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Wonder if that particular target plane was a Betty carrying a certain IJN admiral?

Rex Barber?
Old 09-11-2018, 07:38 AM
  #16316  
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I thought the last clue or two would get a Rex Barber guess, but he's not the guy I'm looking for. Here's yet another clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.
Old 09-11-2018, 01:25 PM
  #16317  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
I thought the last clue or two would get a Rex Barber guess, but he's not the guy I'm looking for. Here's yet another clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.
Was the aircraft heavier than air? Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-11-2018, 04:43 PM
  #16318  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Was the aircraft heavier than air? Thanks; Ernie P.
Yes, both his plane and the unarmed plane he shot down.

I've been toying with the idea of a quiz that would work like the old Twenty Questions radio show. Instead of posting clues, you might name a category, like person, or aircraft, or event, and people would respond by asking questions. This should before too long narrow it down enough so someone would get the right answer. Perhaps with a limit of some number of questions per day, since some participants probably aren't as free as others to spend a lot of time on line. The format might encourage wider participation. Any thoughts? I'm not pushing this, just something that occurred to me.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 09-11-2018 at 04:50 PM.
Old 09-11-2018, 07:20 PM
  #16319  
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We could try it.
Old 09-11-2018, 08:20 PM
  #16320  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Yes, both his plane and the unarmed plane he shot down.

I've been toying with the idea of a quiz that would work like the old Twenty Questions radio show. Instead of posting clues, you might name a category, like person, or aircraft, or event, and people would respond by asking questions. This should before too long narrow it down enough so someone would get the right answer. Perhaps with a limit of some number of questions per day, since some participants probably aren't as free as others to spend a lot of time on line. The format might encourage wider participation. Any thoughts? I'm not pushing this, just something that occurred to me.
Al; what we have been doing is working pretty well, but I don't have anything against new ideas. I do see some issues, such as the number of questions asked in a day, how many questions can be asked in a single post, how many questions one person can ask in total, etc. But if everyone is in agreement, we can try it. How about this: The next time it's your turn you can try it. If it seems to work, we can make it optional at the choice of whoever has the floor. Sound okay? Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-11-2018, 08:28 PM
  #16321  
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Al; you have a PM. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-12-2018, 04:27 AM
  #16322  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a pilot.

1. An ace.

2. Not a spectacularly high-scoring ace, but he is one of a small number of pilots to have achieved a particular kind of success during the one war he fought in.

3. He is remembered today not for his score, not primarily for the kind of success mentioned in clue no. 2, but mostly for what he did on one particular flight.

4. He was once shot down behind enemy lines and was captured, but he escaped. (This was not one of the things referred to in earlier clues.)

5. The feat for which he is remembered is one that some pilots have done accidentally. He did it on purpose.

6. One of the planes he flew is now in a museum.

7. If you've seen that plane, or even a picture of it, you almost certainly remember it.

8. The feat for which he is most remembered was the shooting down of one particular airplane.

9. The plane he shot down had two engines.

10. And it was unarmed.

11. Going back to clue 2: He was one of only three pilots from his country to have shot down a particular combination of enemy planes. Those victories were quite unlike the one to which clues 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 refer.
Old 09-12-2018, 06:05 AM
  #16323  
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Historian says Oregonian Rex Barber shot down Yamamoto in World War II

Operation Vengence
Old 09-12-2018, 07:08 AM
  #16324  
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You're not thinking Captain Tom Lanphier, are you?
I'm thinking this almost had to be a pilot flying over China, Europe or Africa as a pilot shot down over the Pacific was usually stuck on an island with no place to run, that is unless they found a friendly coast watcher to hide them
Old 09-12-2018, 07:48 AM
  #16325  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
You're not thinking Captain Tom Lanphier, are you?
I'm thinking this almost had to be a pilot flying over China, Europe or Africa as a pilot shot down over the Pacific was usually stuck on an island with no place to run, that is unless they found a friendly coast watcher to hide them
I think it's now generally accepted that Barber shot down Yamamoto's plane. Among other things, the maneuvers Lanphier claimed to have made with his P-38 seem to be well beyond what a P-38 could do. It was fast and had a long range (especially after Lindberg taught pilots how to fly them), but it wasn't much of a dogfighter. Galland thought the P-38 was roughly equivalent to the Bf 110. Anyway, I'm not looking for Lanphier.

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