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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 10-25-2019, 04:36 AM
  #17701  
FlyerInOKC
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I'm still drawing a blank!
Old 10-25-2019, 07:26 AM
  #17702  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
I'm still drawing a blank!
That's okay, Sir; things will become ever clearer as we go along. But I do appreciate your comments, and will award a bonus clue to you for checking in. And, while I'm at it, I'll drop the regularly scheduled afternoon clue a bit early. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.
Old 10-25-2019, 12:31 PM
  #17703  
Ernie P.
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A bit early, but here's an evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.
Old 10-25-2019, 03:59 PM
  #17704  
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Zeppelin?
Old 10-25-2019, 06:15 PM
  #17705  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Zeppelin?
Johnny; not a Zeppelin, a Blimp, a bag or a balloon. This was a powered heavier than air craft. But once again, you earn a bonus clue to reward your efforts. Thanks for playing and please try again. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.
Old 10-25-2019, 07:10 PM
  #17706  
elmshoot
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Tupolev ANT-25


Sparky
Old 10-26-2019, 01:32 AM
  #17707  
Ernie P.
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Not the Tupolev, Sparky; but you do earn a bonus clue in addition to today's clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.
Old 10-27-2019, 02:53 AM
  #17708  
Ernie P.
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A couple of Sunday clues. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.
Old 10-27-2019, 04:29 AM
  #17709  
elmshoot
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It sounds like it might be a flying boat or sea plane as a possible answer.
Old 10-27-2019, 03:54 PM
  #17710  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by elmshoot View Post
It sounds like it might be a flying boat or sea plane as a possible answer.
Sparky; you have made a statement, rather than asked a question. Nevertheless, I will respond as though your missive included a question and will also award a bonus clue for your efforts. Response: It might be. <G> Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.
Old 10-28-2019, 06:48 AM
  #17711  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.

23. With the following fifty (50) aircraft modified by the factory.
Old 10-28-2019, 09:11 AM
  #17712  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.

23. With the following fifty (50) aircraft modified by the factory.

24. All successive models were enlarged and fitted with progressively more powerful engines.
Old 10-28-2019, 12:46 PM
  #17713  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.

23. With the following fifty (50) aircraft modified by the factory.

24. All successive models were enlarged and fitted with progressively more powerful engines.

25. But, again, they all looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.
Old 10-29-2019, 01:40 AM
  #17714  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.

23. With the following fifty (50) aircraft modified by the factory.

24. All successive models were enlarged and fitted with progressively more powerful engines.

25. But, again, they all looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

26. The increasing availability of more powerful engines was a hallmark of the times; a period of almost explosive advances in internal combustion engine technology.
Old 10-29-2019, 04:33 AM
  #17715  
Top_Gunn
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OK, tough quiz but I think I've got it at last (thanks in large part to Elmshoot's guess about the flying boat possibility): Curtiss Model H and successors?
Old 10-29-2019, 06:09 AM
  #17716  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
OK, tough quiz but I think I've got it at last (thanks in large part to Elmshoot's guess about the flying boat possibility): Curtiss Model H and successors?
Right you are, Al; and you are now up. I'm sure Sparky's guess helped you along. Then again; he may have simply been trying to push you into the lead, no? <G> I wanted to highlight this plane because it was the only truly American plane to see combat service in WWI. Yes, we built a lot of DH-4's; but they were simply re-engined copies of the British version. The relationship between the Curtiss Model H and the famed Felixstowe flying boats is also interesting. Okay; you have the Conch shell, Al; what do you have for us? Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft is often overlooked in the history books.

2. Although it holds a rather important distinction.

3. This aircraft holds a rather important distinction.

4. And, it was unique in at least one aspect.

5. It was noted for its endurance; which gained it favor for its mission.

6. Its owning nation never used it in actual combat.

7. But allied nations did.

8. Its cargo carrying capacity was also a notable feature.

9. Our subject aircraft was not so much an aircraft model as a group of aircraft models.

10. The first pair of aircraft built were developed to win a prize being offered for a long distance flight.

11. These aircraft, and later models of these aircraft, were produced over three decades.

12. In the end, several hundred of these aircraft were produced.

13. The aircraft design was in a constant state of change, sometimes in response to customer requirements.

14. And sometimes in response to evolving technology.

15. Essentially, the aircraft design was continually changing; becoming larger and fitted with more powerful engines.

16. But they were all similar; in that they looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

17. When conflict broke out, the first two manufactured were seized by a belligerent nation.

18. Which then paid for them and ordered a dozen more.

19. In the end, that nation ordered several dozen, all militarized versions.

20. “Militarized” by the fitting of gun mounts and various other small changes.

21. In the end, a total of 64 of these aircraft were produced in the first “class” before the succession of larger and more powerful types of the same aircraft began.

22. The first two, and the following dozen, were militarized by the customer.

23. With the following fifty (50) aircraft modified by the factory.

24. All successive models were enlarged and fitted with progressively more powerful engines.

25. But, again, they all looked pretty much the same and flew pretty much the same.

26. The increasing availability of more powerful engines was a hallmark of the times; a period of almost explosive advances in internal combustion engine technology.

27. And the aircraft themselves, the original 64, were referred to by the men who flew them, as being citizens of the producing country.

28. When the original prize was offered, a foreign businessman decided the prize should be won by his country.

29. He approached the designing and building company directly, and commissioned the building of the first two aircraft.

30. And those first two aircraft were named after him.

31. The company which built the aircraft, ironically enough, then approached a citizen of the country, one of whose businesses had offering the prize, to assist in the design of the aircraft.

32. He not only helped design the aircraft, he served as chief test pilot.

33. So, in the end, the aircraft was largely designed and built as a collaboration by the country offering the prize, and the country which won the prize.

34. The man who served as the main designer, or who provided oversight of the design; and the man who owned the company which built the aircraft; were both noted aviation pioneers.

35. And they were motivated by the monetary backing of a very nationalist business pioneer.

36. A man whose name is still prominent in many fields today.

37. The first two aircraft were essentially scaled up versions of an aircraft already designed and built by the aviation pioneer and company owner mentioned in (34).

38. The resulting twin engine aircraft resembled the earlier aircraft, but was considerable larger, in order to carry more fuel.

39. And featured a completely enclosed cockpit.

40. Which housed all three crew members.

41. When the first aircraft was completed, and named for the owning country, testing began the next day.

42. And quickly revealed problems which had never surfaced before.

43. Primarily because of the power increase of the twin engines.

44. These problems were quickly corrected by some innovative design changes.

45. And preparations made for the record breaking flight.

46. But the outbreak of conflict forced the chief designer to return to his country for military service.

47. And stopped the planned record setting flight attempt.

48. Back home, and impressed by what he had seen, he urged his country’s military to commandeer the first two aircraft, which was quickly done.

49. And testing of the first two aircraft quickly lead to the order for the next 12, and the 50 which followed.

50. Some of the 12 were assembled in the belligerent country under the supervision of the designer.

51. Under the pressure of wartime service, the aircraft were considered invaluable and the process of “bigger, heavier and more powerful” began.

52. And lead directly to some famed aviation advances in the purchasing country.

53. Meanwhile, in the building country, larger versions were built; which were ultimately operated by both countries.

54. The original challenge which lead to the first two aircraft being built was issued in 1913.

55. By the Daily Mail.

56. And the challenge was answered in the United States.

57. And lead to the development of commercial aviation.

58. But first the two original aircraft were pressed into service by the Royal Navy for patrol and rescue operations.

59. A role for which they were almost uniquely qualified.















Answer: The Curtiss Model H; or, as the British called them, The Americans. The only American designed and built aircraft to see active combat service in WWI.

The Curtiss Model H was a family of classes of early long-range flying boats, the first two of which were developed directly on commission in the United States in response to the £10,000 prize challenge issued in 1913 by the London newspaper, the Daily Mail, for the first non-stop aerial crossing of the Atlantic. As the first aircraft having transatlantic range and cargo-carrying capacity, it became the grandfather development leading to early international commercial air travel, and by extension, to the modern world of commercial aviation. The last widely produced class, the Model H-12, was retrospectively designated Model 6 by Curtiss' company in the 1930s, and various classes have variants with suffixed letters indicating differences.

Design and development

Having transatlantic range and cargo carrying capacity by design, the first H-2 class (soon dubbed "The Americans" by the Royal Navy) was quickly drafted into wartime use as a patrol and rescue aircraft by the RNAS, the air arm of the British Royal Navy. The original two "contest" aircraft were in fact temporarily seized by the Royal Navy, which later paid for them and placed an initial follow-on order for an additional 12 — all 14 of which were militarized (e.g. by adding gun mounts) and designated the "H-4" (the two originals were thereafter the "H-2" Models to air historians). These changes were produced under contract from Curtiss' factory in the last order of 50 "H-4s", giving a class total of 64, before the evolution of a succession of larger, more adaptable, and more robust H-class models. This article covers the whole line of nearly 500 Curtiss Model H seaplane flying boat aircraft known to have been produced, since successive models - by whatever sub-model designation - were physically similar, handled similarly, essentially just being increased in size and fitted with larger and improved engines — the advances in internal combustion engine technology in the 1910s being as rapid and explosive as any technological advance has ever been.

When London's Daily Mail newspaper put up a £10,000 prize for the first non-stop aerial crossing of the Atlantic in 1913, American businessman Rodman Wanamaker became determined that the prize should go to an American aircraft and commissioned the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company to design and build an aircraft capable of making the flight. The Mail's offer of a large monetary prize for "an aircraft with transoceanic range" (in an era with virtually no airports) galvanized air enthusiasts worldwide, and in America, prompted a collaboration between the American and British air pioneers: Glenn Curtiss and John Cyril Porte, spurred financially by the nationalistically motivated financing of air enthusiast Rodman Wanamaker. The class, while commissioned by Wanamaker, was designed under Porte's supervision following his study and rearrangement of the flight plan and built in the Curtiss workshops.[3] The outcome was a scaled-up version of Curtiss' work for the United States Navy and his Curtiss Model F.[2] With Porte also as Chief Test Pilot, development and testing of two prototypes proceeded rapidly, despite the inevitable surprises and teething troubles inherent in new engines, hull and fuselage.

The Wanamaker Flier was a conventional biplane design with two-bay, unstaggered wings of unequal span with two tractor engines mounted side by side above the fuselage in the interplane gap. Wingtip pontoons were attached directly below the lower wings near their tips. The aircraft resembled Curtiss' earlier flying boat designs, but was considerably larger in order to carry enough fuel to cover 1,100 mi (1,770 km). The three crew members were accommodated in a fully enclosed cabin.

Named America[3] and launched 22 June 1914, trials began the following day and soon revealed a serious shortcoming in the design: the tendency for the nose of the aircraft to try to submerge as engine power increased while taxiing on water. This phenomenon had not been encountered before, since Curtiss' earlier designs had not used such powerful engines. In order to counteract this effect, Curtiss fitted fins to the sides of the bow to add hydrodynamic lift, but soon replaced these with sponsons to add more buoyancy. Both prototypes, once fitted with sponsons, were then called Model H-2s incrementally updated alternating in succession. These sponsons would remain a prominent feature of flying boat hull design in the decades to follow. With the problem resolved, preparations for the transatlantic crossing resumed, and 5 August 1914 was selected to take advantage of the full moon.

These plans were interrupted by the outbreak of the First World War, which also saw Porte, who was to pilot the America with George Hallett, recalled to service with the British Royal Navy. Impressed by the capabilities he had witnessed, Porte urged the Admiralty to commandeer (and later, purchase) the America and her sister aircraft from Curtiss. By the late summer of 1914 they were both successfully fully tested and shipped to England 30 September, aboard RMS Mauretania. This was followed by a decision to order a further 12 similar aircraft, one Model H-2 and the remaining as Model H-4s, four examples of the latter actually being assembled in the UK by Saunders. All of these were essentially identical to the design of the America, and indeed, were all referred to as "Americas" in Royal Navy service. This initial batch was followed by an order for another 50.

These aircraft were soon of great interest to the British Admiralty as anti-submarine patrol craft and for air-sea rescue roles. The initial Royal Navy purchase of just two aircraft eventually spawned a fleet of aircraft which saw extensive military service during World War I in these roles, being extensively developed in the process (together with many spinoff or offspring variants) under the compressed research and development cycles available in wartime. Consequently, as the war progressed, the Model H was developed into progressively larger variants, and it served as the basis for parallel developments in the United Kingdom under John Cyril Porte which led to the "Felixstowe" series of flying boats with their better hydrodynamic hull forms, beginning with the Felixstowe F.1 — a hull form which thereafter became the standard in seaplanes of all kinds, just as sponsons did for flying boats.

Curtiss next developed an enlarged version of the same design, designated the Model H-8, with accommodation for four crew members. A prototype was constructed and offered to the United States Navy, but was ultimately also purchased by the British Admiralty. This aircraft would serve as the pattern for the Model H-12, used extensively by both the Royal Navy and the United States Navy. Upon their adoption into service by the RNAS, they became known as Large Americas, with the H-4s receiving the retronymSmall America.

As built, the Model H-12s had 160 hp (118 kW) Curtiss V-X-X engines, but these engines were under powered and deemed unsatisfactory by the British so in Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) service the H-12 was re-engined with the 275 hp (205 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle I and then the 375 hp (280 kW) Eagle VIII. Porte redesigned the H-12 with an improved hull; this design, the Felixstowe F.2, was produced and entered service. Some of the H-12s were later rebuilt with a hull similar to the F.2, these rebuilds being known as the Converted Large America. Later aircraft for the U.S. Navy received the Liberty engine (designated Curtiss H-12L).

Curiously, the Curtiss company designation Model H-14 was applied to a completely unrelated design (see Curtiss HS), but the Model H-16, introduced in 1917, represented the final step in the evolution of the Model H design. With longer-span wings, and a reinforced hull similar to the Felixstowe flying boats, the H-16s were powered by Liberty engines in U.S. Navy service and by Eagle IVs for the Royal Navy. These aircraft remained in service through the end of World War I. Some were offered for sale as surplus military equipment at $11,053 apiece (one third of the original purchase price). Others remained in U.S. Navy service for some years after the war, most receiving engine upgrades to more powerful Liberty variants.



Operational history



With the RNAS, H-12s and H-16s operated from flying boat stations on the coast in long-range anti-submarine and anti-Zeppelin patrols over the North Sea. A total of 71 H-12s and 75 H-16s were received by the RNAS, commencing patrols in April 1917, with 18 H-12s and 30 H-16s remaining in service in October 1918.

U.S. Navy H-12s were kept at home and did not see foreign service, but ran anti-submarine patrols from their own naval stations. Twenty aircraft were delivered to the U.S. Navy. Some of the H-16s, however, arrived at bases in the UK in time to see limited service just before the cessation of hostilities.

Variants

Curtiss H-16 in U.S. Navy service.· · Model H-1 or Model 6: original America intended for transatlantic crossing (two prototypes built)· · Model H-2 (one built)· · Model H-4: similar to H-1 for RNAS (62 built)· · Model H-7: Super America [10]· · Model H-8: enlarged version of the H-4 (one prototype built)· · Model H-12 or Model 6A: production version of H-8 with Curtiss V-X-X engines (104 built) o o Model H-12A or Model 6B: RNAS version re-engined with Rolls-Royce Eagle I o o Model H-12B or Model 6D: RNAS version re-engined with Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII o o Model H-12L: USN version re-engined with Liberty engine· · Model H-16 or Model 6C: enlarged version of H-12 (334 built by Curtiss and Naval Aircraft Factory) o o Model H-16-1: Model 16 fitted with pusher engines (one built) o o Model H-16-2: Model 16 fitted with pusher engines and revised wing cellule (one built)

Operators

Brazil· Brazilian Naval Aviation Canada· Canadian Air Force - two former Royal Air Force H-16 Large Americas as an Imperial Gift[11] Netherlands· Royal Netherlands Naval Air Service - one Curtiss H-12 in service[12] United Kingdom· Royal Naval Air Service· Royal Air Force o No. 228 Squadron RAF

o No. 234 Squadron RAF

o No. 240 Squadron RAF

o No. 249 Squadron RAF

United States· United States Navy· American Trans-Oceanic Company

Specifications (Model H-12A)



Data from Curtiss Aircraft 1907–1947 British naval aircraft since 1912

General characteristics· · Crew: 4· · Length: 46 ft 6 in (14.17 m)· · Wingspan: 92 ft 8.5 in (28.258 m)· · Height: 16 ft 6 in (5.03 m)· · Wing area: 1,216 sq ft (113.0 m2)· · Airfoil: RAF 6[15]· · Empty weight: 7,293 lb (3,308 kg)· · Gross weight: 10,650 lb (4,831 kg)· · Powerplant: 2 × Rolls-Royce Eagle I V-12 water-cooled piston engines, 275 hp (205 kW) each later345 hp (257 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle VII or375 hp (280 kW) Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII· · Propellers: 4-bladed fixed-pitch propellers

Performance· · Maximum speed: 85 mph (137 km/h, 74 kn) at 2,000 ft (610 m)· · Endurance: 6 hours· · Service ceiling: 10,800 ft (3,300 m)· · Rate of climb: 336 ft/min (1.71 m/s)· · Time to altitude: 2,000 ft (610 m) in 3 minutes 18 seconds ; 10,000 ft (3,000 m) in 29 minutes 48 seconds

Armament· · Guns: 4 × .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns on flexible mounts· · Bombs: 4 × 100 lb (45 kg) or 2 × 230 lb (100 kg) bombs below the wings
Old 10-29-2019, 08:18 AM
  #17717  
Top_Gunn
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OK, here we go again.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.

2. Its performance in one role was acceptable, but that role was not one that its country had much need for at the time, so it was given other roles, for which it was ill-suited.

3. It was flown by three services of the one country that used it.
Old 10-30-2019, 04:20 AM
  #17718  
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This morning's clue:

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.

2. Its performance in one role was acceptable, but that role was not one that its country had much need for at the time, so it was given other roles, for which it was ill-suited.

3. It was flown by three services of the one country that used it.

4. It was a fighter. It was considered hard to fly, although one of its country's top-scoring aces got some of his kills while flying it.
Old 10-30-2019, 04:44 AM
  #17719  
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Hint # 4 sounds like a Sopwith Camel.
Old 10-30-2019, 08:10 AM
  #17720  
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Originally Posted by FlyerInOKC View Post
Hint # 4 sounds like a Sopwith Camel.
It does indeed. But I'm looking for a different airplane. You certainly earn a bonus clue for that guess.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.

2. Its performance in one role was acceptable, but that role was not one that its country had much need for at the time, so it was given other roles, for which it was ill-suited.

3. It was flown by three services of the one country that used it.

4. It was a fighter. It was considered hard to fly, although one of its country's top-scoring aces got some of his kills while flying it.

5. One reason for its poor handling was that it had a higher wing loading than many of its contemporaries.
Old 10-30-2019, 09:06 AM
  #17721  
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Amazing topic!
Old 10-30-2019, 09:08 AM
  #17722  
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amazing topic!
Old 10-30-2019, 02:50 PM
  #17723  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
It does indeed. But I'm looking for a different airplane. You certainly earn a bonus clue for that guess.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.

2. Its performance in one role was acceptable, but that role was not one that its country had much need for at the time, so it was given other roles, for which it was ill-suited.

3. It was flown by three services of the one country that used it.

4. It was a fighter. It was considered hard to fly, although one of its country's top-scoring aces got some of his kills while flying it.

5. One reason for its poor handling was that it had a higher wing loading than many of its contemporaries.
Sir; a request for clarification, if I may. You stated in clue (1): "Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.". Are you stating that design began after the "war" (NFI) began? As in after September 1st, 1939? Or after July 28th, 1914? Or after the building country joined the war? For example, December 7th, 1941 was the date the United States joined WWII, but the war had already been going on for more than two years. Clarification, please. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 10-30-2019, 05:23 PM
  #17724  
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Originally Posted by Ernie P. View Post
Sir; a request for clarification, if I may. You stated in clue (1): "Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.". Are you stating that design began after the "war" (NFI) began? As in after September 1st, 1939? Or after July 28th, 1914? Or after the building country joined the war? For example, December 7th, 1941 was the date the United States joined WWII, but the war had already been going on for more than two years. Clarification, please. Thanks; Ernie P.
Well, it was certainly after the war in which it fought had begun. So, September 1st or July 28th, but probably not December 7th. Although sometimes it's hard to say when a particular country began participating in a war. For instance, the USA was helping the Brits in many ways before December 7.
Old 10-31-2019, 04:26 AM
  #17725  
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This morning's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Designed and built early in a war. It was an improved version of an earlier airplane from the same manufacturer.

2. Its performance in one role was acceptable, but that role was not one that its country had much need for at the time, so it was given other roles, for which it was ill-suited.

3. It was flown by three services of the one country that used it.

4. It was a fighter. It was considered hard to fly, although one of its country's top-scoring aces got some of his kills while flying it.

5. One reason for its poor handling was that it had a higher wing loading than many of its contemporaries.

6. Another problem, at least initially, was that when it first went into service the pilots who flew it had previously flown airplanes that were much more docile.

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