Go Back  RCU Forums > RC Airplanes > RC Warbirds and Warplanes
Reload this Page >

Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Notices
RC Warbirds and Warplanes Discuss rc warbirds and warplanes in this forum.

Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 09-23-2020, 08:50 AM
  #19051  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 8,822
Likes: 0
Received 31 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

That takes out all the German pilots in WWI since the Luftwaffe was not formed until the mid 1930s.
Old 09-23-2020, 12:19 PM
  #19052  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
IIRC, wasn't Roy Brown the person that got credit for shooting down the "Red Baron"? Also, IIRC, if it was Brown, he was flying a single seater at the time but didn't actually shoot the "Baron" down. The "Baron" was hit in the side by ground fire while trying to avoid fire from the pursuing fighter and died after landing his still flyable aircraft on a nearby field
Sir; I'd like to correct something. Roy Brown wasn't given credit, or even honorable mention, for shooting down the Red Baron until well after WWI ended; sometime in the late 20s to mid-30s. At the time, the credit for shooting down Richthofen was officially given, after a thorough investigation, by the British General in charge of the area, to the Australian machine gunners firing from the ground. Roy Brown wasn't ever given any form of official recognition to my knowledge; and there wasn't any "controversy" until British writers stirred the pot to sell books many years after the war. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-23-2020, 12:58 PM
  #19053  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 8,822
Likes: 0
Received 31 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

Okay, I knew he was linked somehow to the event, didn't know it was long after the fact. Thanks for the clarification, much appreciated
Old 09-24-2020, 04:28 AM
  #19054  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Morning clue.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.
Old 09-24-2020, 12:08 PM
  #19055  
JohnnyS
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Toronto, ON, CANADA
Posts: 730
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

Eric "Winkle" Brown? I just read his book a short while ago.
Old 09-24-2020, 01:21 PM
  #19056  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Not Brown; bonus clue below.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.

9. One of his civilian flights, in a military aircraft, set a record.
Old 09-25-2020, 04:16 AM
  #19057  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.

9. One of his civilian flights, in a military aircraft, set a record.

10. He had an unusual but catchy nickname.
Old 09-25-2020, 03:00 PM
  #19058  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Al; something came to me today. I don't have a lot of hope for this answer, since I doubt all the clues will match up, but he was one heck of a pilot. Thanks; Ernie P.


Answer: Stanley “Swede” Vejtasa







Stanley Winfield "Swede" Vejtasa (27 July 1914 – 23 January 2013) was a United States Navy career officer and World War II flying ace.[1][2] During the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, he was credited with downing seven Japanese aircraft in one mission, becoming an "ace in a day".



Vejtasa was born at an isolated homestead in Montana on July 27, 1914, parents of his father came from Czech and his mother from Norway. He attended Montana State College, before transferring to the University of Montana.



He joined the Navy in 1937 and became a Naval Aviator on 13 July 1939.[1][2] Commissioned an ensign in August, he was first assigned to Scouting Squadron Five (VS-5) aboard the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown (CV-5) that same month, flying the Douglas SBD Dauntless.



After the United States entered World War II, then Lieutenant (junior grade) Vejtasa attacked three Japanese "aircraft tenders or transports", scoring a direct hit on one of them "near Salamaua and Lae, New Guinea", on 10 March 1942, for which he was awarded his first Navy Cross.[4]



During the Battle of the Coral Sea, he and several other dive bomber pilots sank the Japanese light aircraft carrier Shōhō on 7 May 1942.[5][6] Walter Schindler, the staff gunnery officer and future vice admiral, filmed the day's strike as Vejtasa's rear gunner. The next day, while flying in defence of the US Task Force, Vejtasa claimed three Mitsubishi A6M Zero fighters shot down, despite flying the much slower but sturdy SBD Dauntless dive bomber.[1][6] For his actions during the battle, he was awarded his second Navy Cross.[4]



Vejtasa was transferred to fighters, piloting the Grumman F4F Wildcat, and was assigned to the newly formed Fighting Squadron 10, under Lieutenant Commander James H. Flatley, aboard the USS Enterprise (CV-6). During the Battle of the Santa Cruz Islands, he was credited with downing seven enemy aircraft in one mission – first two Aichi D3A "Val" dive bombers attacking USS Hornet (CV-8), then five Nakajima B5N "Kate" torpedo bombers targeting Enterprise – becoming an "ace in a day".[6][7][8] Lieutenant Vejtasa was awarded his third Navy Cross for this achievement.[4][9] Seventy years later, an attempt to upgrade this to the Medal of Honor was denied.[7] He is the only World War II carrier pilot awarded the Navy Cross "for both dive bombing and aerial combat."[10]



He left Flying Squadron 10 in May 1943 and returned to the United States to serve as a flight instructor at Naval Air Station Atlantic City.[10] He saw no further combat. At the end of the war, his tally was 10.25 victories, including a quarter shared credit for a Kawanishi H6K "Mavis" flying boat on 13 November 1942.



Vejtasa remained in the Navy after the end of the war and served in the Korean War as air officer aboard the USS Essex (CV-9) from 1951 to 1953.[11] He commanded the ammunition ship USS Firedrake (AE-14) from July 1959 to August 1960 and the aircraft carrier USS Constellation (CV-64) from November 1962 to November 1963.[12] He received the Legion of Merit for his work as Commander Fleet Air, Miramar, from 15 August 1965 to 7 June 1968. He retired on 1 July 1970 as a captain.
Old 09-25-2020, 03:24 PM
  #19059  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Not him; our target had a much more unusual nickname, about which there's more information in your bonus clue.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.

9. One of his civilian flights, in a military aircraft, set a record.

10. He had an unusual but catchy nickname.

11. That nickname derived from one of the false statements made in his wartime publicity.
Old 09-26-2020, 04:26 AM
  #19060  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Today's clue, which is pretty important.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.

9. One of his civilian flights, in a military aircraft, set a record.

10. He had an unusual but catchy nickname.

11. That nickname derived from one of the false statements made in his wartime publicity.

12. Although the main purpose of the publicity he received was boosting civilian morale, the falsehoods included in that publicity were designed to deceive the enemy about how he and some other pilots managed to achieve their successes.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 09-26-2020 at 04:29 AM.
Old 09-26-2020, 05:23 PM
  #19061  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Today's clue, which is pretty important.

Looking for the name of a well-known pilot.

1. An ace, with a very respectable score but not, I think, number one on any strictly numerical list.

2. Very well known, in part perhaps because the authorities encouraged the publicizing of his successes to improve morale.

3. Most of the airplanes he flew during his war had a crew of two.

4. After finishing school, he worked as an engineering apprentice.

5. Some of the public accounts of his successes contained statements now known to have been flat-out lies.

6. One of his victories was achieved without firing a shot.

7. After his war, he returned to civilian life but did serve in a reserve unit.

8. He had a long and successful civilian career as a test pilot.

9. One of his civilian flights, in a military aircraft, set a record.

10. He had an unusual but catchy nickname.

11. That nickname derived from one of the false statements made in his wartime publicity.

12. Although the main purpose of the publicity he received was boosting civilian morale, the falsehoods included in that publicity were designed to deceive the enemy about how he and some other pilots managed to achieve their successes.
Now, Al; you had to know that would give it away. I may be a bit slow, but I'm not THAT slow. I'm assuming you want this solved, so.... How about John Cunningham? Thanks; Ernie P.


Answer: John Cunningham









John "Cat's Eyes" Cunningham CBE, DSO & Two Bars, DFC & Bar, AE (27 July 1917 – 21 July 2002) was a Royal Air Force (RAF) night fighter ace during the Second World War and a test pilot. During the war he was nicknamed "Cat's Eyes" by the British press to explain his successes and to avoid communicating the existence of airborne radar to the enemy.



Cunningham was born in Croydon, and as a teenager was keen on entering the aviation industry. Temporarily abiding by his father's wishes for him to avoid the military, he approached the de Havilland company and was accepted as an engineering candidate. Concurrently, he joined the Royal Auxiliary Air Force and became a member of No. 604 (County of Middlesex) Squadron. Cunningham began his training in August 1935, flew solo in March 1936 and received his wings in 1937. He gradually became an established test pilot, gaining considerable flying time on different types of aircraft.



In August 1939 Cunningham rejoined his squadron, now equipped with a version of the Bristol Blenheim. His observer was Jimmy Rawnsley, who would serve as his gunner and radio operator for most of the war and contribute to all but three of his victories. In July 1940 the squadron was re-designated as a specialised night fighter unit and was amongst the first to receive airborne interception radar (AI). Cunningham was promoted to squadron leader in September 1940.



On the night of the 19 November 1940, Cunningham claimed his first victory. By the time the Blitz had ended in June 1941, he had destroyed 13 enemy aircraft and claimed three as probable victories, and two damaged. After a prolonged rest period, he was promoted to wing commander in 1942. He was also appointed to command No. 85 Squadron RAF, by which time his tally had reached 16 enemy aircraft destroyed. In 1943 and early 1944 he added a further four victories, one probable and one damaged. Cunningham's combat career ended with 20 aerial victories, three probable and six damaged. He spent the remainder of the conflict in various staff officer positions. By the end of the war in Europe in May 1945 he had attained the rank of group captain.



After the war Cunningham rejoined de Havilland and continued his test-pilot career. He flew the world's first jet airliner, the de Havilland Comet, in 1949. He then flew commercial jets for a time in the early 1960s and continued flying in the industry until the late 1970s. He also worked for British Aerospace as executive director, retiring in 1980. In recognition of his wartime exploits and his contribution to civil aviation he was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In his retirement Cunningham was nearly financially ruined when Lloyd's of London ran into difficulty in 1988. He was forced to live frugally until the end of his life. He died six days shy of his 85th birthday.



In early 1941 the British press, with permission from the Air Ministry, was allowed to approach Cunningham and write about his experiences. One of the motivating reasons for the lack of censorship was morale. In the early stages of the Blitz, the perception among the civilian population was that the Germans could attack at will over Britain during the night. The publication of Cunningham's exploits were an attempt to assure the public the RAF was fighting back and imposing losses upon the Luftwaffe. Cunningham was singled out for attention for this purpose, though Rawnsley's contribution to his success was virtually ignored.[51]



The Air Ministry did not want to allow the enemy to learn of their airborne radar. German night fighters would not be equipped with such devices on a large scale until much later. A legend was created to explain his successes instead. As the first night fighter ace, they were allowed to publish his picture. The captions read that his eyesight was so exceptional it allowed him to see in the dark with the same visually ability as a domestic cat. It was also said that his diet of carrots provided him with vitamin A which allowed him to maintain excellent night-vision. The ensuing public adulation was detested by Cunningham, but he accepted the "Cats-Eyes" tag as a necessary deception. The propaganda story served its purpose for the populace when it was released to the public in January 1941. The success of night defences also told the Germans the RAF was either improving its techniques, or it had something new.[52][53]



The premier night fighter aces in the RAF—Cunningham, Braham and Branse Burbridge—did not appreciate press attention. In the case of Cunningham and Burbridge, this may have stemmed from deeper religious convictions about combat and killing. Burbridge became a priest during the war and neither he nor Cunningham cooperated with biographers when approached to have their exploits described in print after the war. During the war, Braham also actively shunned the lime-light. One of the country's best-selling newspapers, the Daily Express, asked to interview him but he declined. Much to Braham's embarrassment, his father gave interviews about his then famous son in 1943. When no stories were forthcoming, the newspapers soon lost interest. Braham and Cunningham were certainly aware of each other as a result of the press attention, and a competitive rivalry developed. In his book Scramble, Braham mentioned with pride the night he surpassed Cunningham's score permanently.



In March 1948 he set a world flight altitude record of 59,430 feet (18,114 metres) in a Ghost-powered Vampire. The flight lasted for 45 minutes, reaching 50,000 feet in 13.5 minutes. The following year he went on to test the de Havilland Comet, the world's first jet airliner which first flew in 1949. On 23 May 1952 he flew the Comet—now a highly successful export—carrying the recently widowed Queen Mother and Princess Margaret on a four-hour tour around the Alps. At one point he supervised the Queen Mother as she took the controls. She was to dine with members of the No. 600 Royal Auxiliary Air Force squadron later that night and was anxious to say she had piloted an aircraft. Cunningham continued to test-fly prototypes such as the re-built Comet 3 and 4 in the late 1950s. In 1955 he was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Aero Club. On 23 October 1956 he travelled to the United States and received the Harmon Trophy from President Dwight D. Eisenhower. It was the most prestigious American trophy for services of civil aviation.
Old 09-26-2020, 08:26 PM
  #19062  
Hydro Junkie
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Marysville, WA
Posts: 8,822
Likes: 0
Received 31 Likes on 31 Posts
Default

I was starting to think Richard Bong, that is until I remembered that he was killed when he crashed in an F-80 during a test flight. Actually, he wasn't in the plane when it crashed, he had bailed out too low and was killed due to his parachute not deploying fast enough IIRC
Old 09-27-2020, 05:20 AM
  #19063  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Ernie has nailed it, of course. i did think the last clue might have been too revealing, but there weren't a lot of other possibilities left. I can vaguely remember being encouraged to eat carrots to assure good eyesight as a kid in the 1940s. Maybe it even worked: I am still legal to drive without glasses. As I understand it, though, carrots contain things that are good for vision, but so do lots of other things, so most people eating adequate diets don't need large doses of carrots. Whether the carrots-help-eyesight tale was a pre-war story that the Brits used or something they made up for the occasion seems unclear.
Old 09-27-2020, 05:38 AM
  #19064  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Ernie has nailed it, of course. i did think the last clue might have been too revealing, but there weren't a lot of other possibilities left. I can vaguely remember being encouraged to eat carrots to assure good eyesight as a kid in the 1940s. Maybe it even worked: I am still legal to drive without glasses. As I understand it, though, carrots contain things that are good for vision, but so do lots of other things, so most people eating adequate diets don't need large doses of carrots. Whether the carrots-help-eyesight tale was a pre-war story that the Brits used or something they made up for the occasion seems unclear.
Thank you for am excellent question, Al. I'll get something up later today. Right now, I have to head for the RC flying field. You're correct about the carrots legend. The carrot story was made up from whole cloth and there were a lot of associated stories and photos backing up the ruse. Carrots are no better than a lot of other foods; it was all a ruse; although one still hanging around today. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 09-27-2020, 01:17 PM
  #19065  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

And here we go again. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type.



2. It was used by three different nations.
Old 09-28-2020, 12:32 AM
  #19066  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

A morning clue and a correction. I realized the first clue could be misleading and corrected it. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.
Old 09-28-2020, 09:04 AM
  #19067  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.

Old 09-28-2020, 07:21 PM
  #19068  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.



What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.
Old 09-29-2020, 03:47 AM
  #19069  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.
Old 09-29-2020, 04:15 AM
  #19070  
Top_Gunn
My Feedback: (6)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Granger, IN
Posts: 2,145
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Default

Just to get the ball rolling: How about the Fokker D.XXI? First modern Dutch fighter, used in combat by the Dutch, Germans, and Finns.
Old 09-29-2020, 04:24 AM
  #19071  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
Just to get the ball rolling: How about the Fokker D.XXI? First modern Dutch fighter, used in combat by the Dutch, Germans, and Finns.
An excellent answer, Al; and it meets all the current clues. But, not where we're headed. Still, you earn a bonus clue for your efforts and please try again. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.



7. And flown by the same individual and his chief test pilot.
Old 09-29-2020, 08:01 AM
  #19072  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.



7. And flown by the same individual and his chief test pilot.



8. The plane was named for a fictitious aircraft from a famous short story, by a famous author.
Old 09-29-2020, 02:48 PM
  #19073  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.



7. And flown by the same individual and his chief test pilot.



8. The plane was named for a fictitious aircraft from a famous short story, by a famous author.



9. The fuselage was built by one firm.
Old 09-30-2020, 04:26 AM
  #19074  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.



7. And flown by the same individual and his chief test pilot.



8. The plane was named for a fictitious aircraft from a famous short story, by a famous author.



9. The fuselage was built by one firm.



10. While the designer’s firm built the wings.
Old 09-30-2020, 10:11 AM
  #19075  
Ernie P.
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
Posts: 6,103
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This was the first successful aircraft of its type to be produced in its home country.



2. It was used by three different nations.



3. And served during a conflict involving these nations.



4. Two of which were on opposing sides.



5. And the third was, for all intents, on both sides.



6. Our subject aircraft was designed by a famous designer and builder of equally famous aircraft.



7. And flown by the same individual and his chief test pilot.



8. The plane was named for a fictitious aircraft from a famous short story, by a famous author.



9. The fuselage was built by one firm.



10. While the designer’s firm built the wings.



11. The first prototype was nearing completion when it was, for some reason, abandoned; and it never flew.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.