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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 02-26-2021, 01:57 PM
  #19526  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.
Old 02-27-2021, 06:31 AM
  #19527  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.
Old 02-27-2021, 11:35 AM
  #19528  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.
Old 02-27-2021, 02:12 PM
  #19529  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.
Old 02-28-2021, 08:26 AM
  #19530  
Ernie P.
Senior Member
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.
Old 02-28-2021, 12:52 PM
  #19531  
Ernie P.
Senior Member
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.
Old 03-01-2021, 05:19 AM
  #19532  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. By now, you should have figured out this is a rather early aircraft. As clue (1) stated; this was the first of its type. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.
Old 03-01-2021, 10:52 AM
  #19533  
Ernie P.
Senior Member
My Feedback: (3)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Bealeton, VA
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Default

Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.
Old 03-01-2021, 06:54 PM
  #19534  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.
Old 03-02-2021, 05:17 AM
  #19535  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. And I honestly expected this one would be solved before I hit the 15th clue. Is anyone actually trying to solve it? Thanks; Ernie P.




What warbird do I describe?

1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.

2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.

3. It was built in three different countries.

4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.

5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.

6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.

7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.

8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.

9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.

10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.

11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.

12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.

13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.

14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.

15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.

16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.

17. Which resulted in a probable kill.

18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.

19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.

20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.

21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.

22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.

23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.

24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.

25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.

26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.

27. In fact, only one pilot achieved ace status in this aircraft.

28. And one observer.

29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.

30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.

31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.

32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.

33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.

34. But it also had more than 50% more power.

35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.

36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.

37. And two wings.

38. And, typically, one machine gun.

39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.

40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.

41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.

42. Although it didnt reach the field for a few months.

43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.

44. It was powered by a single engine.

45. A single engine of rotary design.

46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.

47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.

48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.

49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.

50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.

51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.

52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.

53. Length was over 27 feet.

54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.

55. Range was good at 250 miles.

56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.

57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.

58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.
Old 03-02-2021, 11:24 AM
  #19536  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Reading the clues will give us the following key facts. Thanks; Ernie P.We have an early aircraft with an eventually unsuccessful configuration; the first designed specifically to perform its mission; single forward firing gun; two crewmen; two wings; slow speed; low rate of climb; a single 100 horsepower rotary engine; a short service life; and which was quickly outclassed by enemy aircraft of its type.



What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.
Old 03-03-2021, 06:03 PM
  #19537  
Ernie P.
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Today's clue. Sorry, but I've been fighting internet access issues. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.
Old 03-04-2021, 05:20 AM
  #19538  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.
Old 03-04-2021, 12:28 PM
  #19539  
Ernie P.
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Afternoon clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.



62. Produced by Vickers Limited.
Old 03-05-2021, 07:48 AM
  #19540  
Ernie P.
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I'm starting to seriously wonder if anyone is still trying to answer this question. The answer has to be pretty obvious at this point. Morning clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.



62. Produced by Vickers Limited.



63. Which gave its name to all two seater aircraft with a pusher configuration.
Old 03-05-2021, 08:45 PM
  #19541  
Ernie P.
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Evening clue. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.



62. Produced by Vickers Limited.



63. Which gave its name to all two seater aircraft with a pusher configuration.



64. German pilots referred to all similar pusher aircraft as “a Vickers type”.
Old 03-06-2021, 05:22 AM
  #19542  
Ernie P.
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Morning clue. You're looking for an aircraft, the first specifically designed to perform a particular mission, produced by Vickers Limited in 1914. It was a pusher type, biplane with two crew members, powered by a 100 hp rotary engine, with a single machine gun. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a “probable” kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved “ace” status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didn’t reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.



62. Produced by Vickers Limited.



63. Which gave its name to all two seater aircraft with a pusher configuration.



64. German pilots referred to all similar pusher aircraft as “a Vickers type”.



65. The engine was a licensed British-built Monosoupape.
Old 03-06-2021, 01:28 PM
  #19543  
JohnnyS
 
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Ernie,

The Vickers F.B.5 (Fighting Biplane 5) (known as the "Gunbus")

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.5

Unfortunately I can't run a quiz right now, since I'm going to have a complicated week with new projects at work. So the floor is open to anyone with a quiz ready.
Old 03-06-2021, 07:31 PM
  #19544  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by JohnnyS View Post
Ernie,

The Vickers F.B.5 (Fighting Biplane 5) (known as the "Gunbus")

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vickers_F.B.5

Unfortunately I can't run a quiz right now, since I'm going to have a complicated week with new projects at work. So the floor is open to anyone with a quiz ready.
Johnny; you are, of course, correct. Since Johnny can't take the lead right now, the floor is open to anyone who wants to take the lead and ask the next question. First come, first served; so just post your question. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This aircraft was the first of its type to enter service.



2. And the first of its type to be used in actual combat.



3. It was built in three different countries.



4. It was developed from a single pre-war, unsuccessful, prototype.



5. Although the prototype aircraft crashed very early on, it was considered to be worth further development.



6. And that further development led to our subject aircraft.



7. It had a rather short service life, little more than a year of combat.



8. But its successful deployment started a flood of aircraft designed for the same purpose.



9. Aircraft which quickly rendered our subject aircraft obsolescent.



10. Which did not, unfortunately, result in its withdrawal from active service in combat.



11. As a result, our subject aircraft is mostly remembered as being little more than a target for enemy aircraft for much of its service life.



12. But the truth is that our subject aircraft was still a dangerous opponent when properly handled and utilized.



13. As more than one enemy pilot, including some very well known, learned.



14. Very early on, it was discovered the guns intended to be used were going to be a problem.



15. So, they were replaced with lighter and more dependable guns.



16. Its combat debut was less than stellar; as its gun jammed and secondary armament had to be employed.



17. Which resulted in a probable kill.



18. Less than a month later, the same crew, flying a different aircraft of the same type, was forced to land behind enemy lines.



19. The plane fell into enemy hands and the crew was captured.



20. Initially, our subject aircraft was provided to, and utilized by, different units in small numbers.



21. But very quickly, as larger numbers became available, full squadrons were equipped with the aircraft.



22. Within a year, it was outclassed by enemy aircraft; and was soon withdrawn from combat and used for training purposes.



23. The license built engines that powered our subject aircraft were often not up to the quality of the originals; which caused some problems.



24. Inadequate speed and rate of climb were further problems; making the plane inadequate for the role for which it was designed.



25. And some of the features of the aircraft, including its overall configuration, proved to be pretty much dead ends.



26. In the end, the combination of all these factors doomed our subject aircraft to a rather short active service life.



27. In fact, only one pilot achieved ace status in this aircraft.



28. And one observer.



29. A slightly later aircraft, with the same general layout and appearance, had better performance.



30. Which resulted in the later aircraft having a longer service life.



31. And which caused a lot of confusion between the two types.



32. Because the layout and appearance of the two planes were very similar.



33. The later aircraft was considerably heavier.



34. But it also had more than 50% more power.



35. And a stationary inline engine that was more dependable.



36. Our subject aircraft had two crew members.



37. And two wings.



38. And, typically, one machine gun.



39. After the debut of our subject aircraft, enemy aviators typically referred to any aircraft of this type as being one of our subject aircraft.



40. Which would prove to be its most lasting legacy.



41. Our subject aircraft actually first flew before its war began.



42. Although it didnt reach the field for a few months.



43. More than 200 were produced, which was a pretty respectable number for its day.



44. It was powered by a single engine.



45. A single engine of rotary design.



46. Supposedly producing 100 hp; although this was an optimistic figure, most of the time.



47. Its forward firing gun was a big advantage, although the early gun mounts proved problematic. But those issues were soon cleared up with new gun mounts; much of the work being accomplished by field modifications.



48. Several versions were produced, although almost all aircraft produced were of one version.



49. The plane weighed around 1,200 pounds empty.



50. And around 2,000 pounds gross.



51. Which was quite a weight for its 100 hp engine.



52. Wingspan was over 36 feet.



53. Length was over 27 feet.



54. Maximum speed was 70 mph.



55. Range was good at 250 miles.



56. And it could fly for around 4-1/2 hours.



57. It took over 15 minutes to get to 5,000 feet.



58. And quite a bit longer to reach its ceiling of 9,000 feet.



59. It was the first aircraft designed specifically to perform its mission.



60. Subject aircraft first flight was in July, 1914.



61. Subject aircraft was a pusher configuration.



62. Produced by Vickers Limited.



63. Which gave its name to all two seater aircraft with a pusher configuration.



64. German pilots referred to all similar pusher aircraft as a Vickers type.



65. The engine was a licensed British-built Monosoupape.





So, we have an early aircraft with an eventually unsuccessful configuration; the first designed specifically to perform its mission; single forward firing gun; two crewmen; two wings; slow speed; low rate of climb; a single 100 horsepower rotary engine; a short service life; and which was quickly outclassed by enemy aircraft of its type.



Answer: The Vickers F.B.5 Gunbus





The Vickers F.B.5 (Fighting Biplane 5) (known as the "Gunbus") was a British two-seat pusher military biplane of the First World War. Armed with a single .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun operated by the observer in the front of the nacelle, it was the first aircraft purpose-built for air-to-air combat to see service, making it the world's first operational fighter aircraft.


Design and development



Vickers began experimenting with the concept of an armed warplane designed to destroy other aircraft in 1912. The first resulting aircraft was the "Destroyer" (later designated Vickers E.F.B.1) which was shown at the Olympia Aero Show in February 1913, but crashed on its maiden flight. This aircraft was of the "Farman" pusher layout, to avoid the problem of firing through a tractor propeller, and was armed with a single belt-fed Vickers gun.



Vickers continued to pursue the development of armed pusher biplanes, and their Chief Designer Archie Low drew up a new design, the Vickers Type 18, or Vickers E.F.B.2. This was a two-baybiplane powered by a single 80 hp (60 kW) Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine; the aircraft had a steel tube structure, with fabric-covered wings and tail, and a duralumin-covered nacelle with large celluloid windows in the sides. The unequal-span wings were unstaggered, with lateral control by wing warping, while the aircraft had a large semi-circular tailplane. Armament remained a single Vickers gun mounted in the nose of the nacelle, with limited movement possible, and a very poor view for the gunner. The E.F.B.2 made its first flight at Brooklands on 26 November 1913. It was soon followed by the E.F.B.3, powered by a similar engine, but using ailerons instead of wing warping, and with equal-span wings, while the nacelle omitted the large windows fitted to the E.F.B.2.



The belt-fed machine gun proved problematic, and the weapon was changed to the lighter, handier, drum-fed .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun.



The F.B.5 first flew on 17 July 1914. It was powered by a single 100 hp (75 kW) Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine driving a two-bladed propeller, and was of simple, clean, and conventional design compared with its predecessors. In total, 224 F.B.5s were produced, 119 in Britain by Vickers, 99 in France and six in Denmark.

F.B.6

The Vickers F.B.6 was a development of the F.B.5 with an increased span on the upper wing. Only one was built.

F.B.9

A further development of the F.B.5, the Vickers F.B.9, had a more streamlined nacelle and an improved ring mounting (either Vickers or Scarff) for the Lewis gun. Fifty were delivered to Royal Flying Corps training units. A few served in some F.E.2b squadrons while they were waiting for their new aircraft between late 1915 and early 1916.


Operational history



The first F.B.5 was delivered to No. 6 Squadron of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) at Netheravon in November 1914. On 25 December the first use of the F.B.5 in action took place, when F.B.5 No. 664 took off from Joyce Green airfield to engage a German Taube monoplane, hitting the Taube (and possibly causing its loss) with incendiary bullets from a carbine after the Lewis gun jammed. Eighteen days later, the same flight crew, Second Lieutenants M. R. Chidson and D. C. W. Sanders, flying the first F.B.5 in France, No. 1621, were forced to land behind German lines, and the new plane fell into enemy hands.



The F.B.5 began to be seen on the Western Front when the first reached No.2 Squadron RFC on 5 February 1915. The type served in ones and twos with several other units before No. 11 Squadron RFC became the world's first fighter squadron when, fully equipped with the F.B.5, it deployed to Villers-Bretonneux, France on 25 July 1915. Second LieutenantG.S.M. Insall of 11 Squadron won the Victoria Cross for an action on 7 November 1915 in which he destroyed a German aircraft while flying a Gunbus. No. 18 Squadron RFC, which deployed to France in November 1915, also operated the F.B.5 exclusively.



Early aircraft were fitted with British-built Monosoupapes, which proved less reliable than French-built engines, while much work was done before a useful gun mounting became available. Although its forward-firing machine gun was a great advantage, the fighter did not have the speed or rate of climb to pursue its quarry; thus, the F.B.5's performance proved to be inadequate for its intended role. This can be illustrated by noting that only the single pilot/observer team of Lionel Rees and James McKinley Hargreaves became aces while flying this type.



By the end of 1915, the aircraft was outclassed by the Fokker Eindecker. Examples of the improved Vickers F.B.9 were sent to France, pending sufficient supplies of the Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.2b, but the active career of the Gunbus was soon over. The remaining examples were mostly used as trainers.

Legacy



The Vickers company persisted with an active experimental program during the First World War period, including a line of single-seat pusher fighters that culminated in the Vickers F.B.26 Vampire of 191718, but the F.B.5 remained their only significant production aircraft until the Vickers Vimy bomber, which entered service too late to affect the war.



Despite its moderate effectiveness, the Vickers F.B.5 did have a lasting legacy as German pilots continued to refer to British pusher aircraft as "Vickers-types". Many victories over D.H.2 or F.E.2b pushers were reported as destruction of a "Vickers".



A flying replica of the F.B.5 Gunbus was completed in 1966 and flew until late 1968. It is now (2014) an exhibit at the Royal Air Force Museum at Hendon near London.

Variants



E.F.B.2 (Vickers Type 18)

Single-engined two-seat fighter prototype powered by 100 hp (75 kW) Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine. It had a slight overhang on upper wings and wing warping controls. Its nacelle was fitted with large celluloid windows and was armed with a single Vickers machine gun. One built.



E.F.B.3 (Vickers Type 18B)



Revised fighter, with equal-span wings, aileron controls and revised nacelle without windows. One built.



E.F.B.4



Proposed design of similar layout to "Destroyer" - unbuilt.[13]



E.F.B.5



Further improved development of E.F.B.3. Six built for RFC and RNAS.[8]



F.B.5



Production version of E.F.B.5 with rectangular tail surfaces.[8] At least 120 built by Vickers, with 75 built by Darracq in France and 12 by the Tjhusvoerkstedt (Danish Arsenal Workshops), giving a total of at least 207.[16]



F.B.6



Pre-production aircraft, differing from E.F.B.5 by having revised unequal span wings with large overhang and ailerons only on upper wing. One built.[17]



F.B.9



Improved derivative of F.B.5, with revised wings and tail, more streamlined nacelle, a new V-type undercarriage and using streamlined Rafwire bracing instead of conventional cable bracing.[18] 95 built by Vickers and 24 by Darracq, giving 119 in total.[16]



F.B.10



Proposed development with 100 hp (75 kW) Isotta Fraschini engine. Unbuilt.[19]



S.B.1



1914 design for dual control trainer based on E.F.B.3 and powered by 100 hp (75 kW) Anzaniradial engine. Unbuilt.[20][21]

Operators

[img]file:///C:\Users\Ernie\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.png[/img] Denmark

[img]file:///C:\Users\Ernie\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.png[/img]

[img]file:///C:\Users\Ernie\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image001.png[/img] Royal Danish Air Force

[img]file:///C:\Users\Ernie\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image002.png[/img] United Kingdom

[img]file:///C:\Users\Ernie\AppData\Local\Temp\msohtmlclip1\01\ clip_image002.png[/img] Royal Flying Corps

o No. 2 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 5 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 7 Squadron RFC

o

o

o No. 11 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 16 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 18 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 24 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 25 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 32 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 35 Squadron RFC

o

o No. 41 Squadron RFC

Specifications (Vickers F.B.5)



Data from Vickers Aircraft since 1908



General characteristics



Crew: Two, pilot & observer/gunner



Length: 27 ft 2 in (8.28 m)



Wingspan: 36 ft 6 in (11.13 m)



Height: 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m)



Wing area: 382 sq ft (35.5 m2)



Empty weight: 1,220 lb (553 kg)



Gross weight: 2,050 lb (930 kg)



Powerplant: 1 Gnome Monosoupape 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)



Performance



Maximum speed: 70 mph (110 km/h, 61 kn) at 5,000 ft (1,500 m)



Range: 250 mi (400 km, 220 nmi)



Endurance: 4 hours 30 minutes



Service ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,700 m)



Time to altitude: 16 min to 5,000 ft (1,500 m)



Armament



Guns: 1 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun in observer's cockpit
Old 03-07-2021, 08:15 AM
  #19545  
Ernie P.
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Okay; the floor is now open and we're waiting for someone to step up. I can, if no one else steps up, post another question. But the question becomes: "Do we have so few people still covering this forum to continue"? I need some feedback here, guys. Do we continue or simply close it down? We've had a good run, over 1,000,000 views and over 500,000 posts. Maybe all good things come to an end. What say you? Continue or close it down? Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 03-07-2021, 03:55 PM
  #19546  
Hydro Junkie
 
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I intentionally stayed out of this last quiz to see if anyone would join in. I get the feeling that many are afraid of looking foolish by guessing wrong and that keeps them from joining in. With that said, I'm game to keep it running but we do need more participants to make it viable. With only four of five of us consistently involved, not to mention the forums slowing down in general, I'm thinking we may need to consider closing this thread down.
Old 03-07-2021, 06:34 PM
  #19547  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
I intentionally stayed out of this last quiz to see if anyone would join in. I get the feeling that many are afraid of looking foolish by guessing wrong and that keeps them from joining in. With that said, I'm game to keep it running but we do need more participants to make it viable. With only four of five of us consistently involved, not to mention the forums slowing down in general, I'm thinking we may need to consider closing this thread down.
Thanks, HJ. I hope you're wrong, but I'm afraid you're right. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 03-08-2021, 05:47 AM
  #19548  
Ernie P.
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All; the floor is still open. I'd prefer a new player, one of the people who check in but don't participate, step up. If no one else posts by this evening, I'll put something up. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 03-08-2021, 03:52 PM
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I've got a quiz in mind that I'd like to do someday, but like the rest of the regular participants I'd like to see somebody new step in. If nobody does before, say, eight (EST), I'll jump in. But please, don't let this deter anybody.
Old 03-08-2021, 05:07 PM
  #19550  
Top_Gunn
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OK, Once more unto the breach ...

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. This is a very well-known airplane.

2. But what it is best known for is a "first" that had nothing to do with anything military.

3. It served in the armed forces of more than 20 countries.

4. And it took part in a military operation that was itself a significant first in the history of military aviation.




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