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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

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Knowledge Quiz for Warbird wiz

Old 08-25-2022, 02:25 PM
  #20876  
Top_Gunn
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How about the Karman HH-43 Huskie?

I guess not: First flight was in 1953.

On third thought, prototype flew in 1947, so this is probably right.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 08-25-2022 at 02:28 PM.
Old 08-25-2022, 03:26 PM
  #20877  
Ernie P.
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
How about the Karman HH-43 Huskie?

I guess not: First flight was in 1953.

On third thought, prototype flew in 1947, so this is probably right.
Al; it isn't the Huskie; although that is the plane referred to in clue 34. But that was not referring to our subject; just the most famous of the company's offerings. I think you have it now, but a bonus clue, and an evening clue, should seal the deal for you. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird has an amazing performance envelope.



2. Not, perhaps, in the conventional sense.



3. As much as anything, its amazing performance is due not to what it has, but what it doesnt have.



4. It was produced for a specific mission but has been used in many others.



5. It was in production for more than a decade.



6. Then out of production for more than a decade.



7. Before being put back into production.



8. It was put back into production because of the demand for new aircraft.



9. It has a very unconventional design.



10. But a design that was used quite some time prior to the later versions first flight.



11. But then again, the same designer designed both aircraft.



12. The designers first effort was widely hailed as being the safest aircraft of its time.



13. And the first of its type.



14. And a later version, with a different engine, became the first of a new type.



15. The earlier versions of our subject aircraft were used in combat.



16. In one war, an earlier version flew more of one type of mission than all other aircraft combined.



17. Our subject aircraft has served in a more recent conflict.



18. In both manned and unmanned versions.



19. The most notable feature of our subject aircraft is its controllability.



20. Another feature is its incredible load carrying ability.



21. Its empty weight is less than half of its fully loaded weight.



22. Using a different version of the same engine as a (perhaps more famous) +rival aircraft, our subject has a payload weight twice as heavy.



23. In fact, our subject aircraft is often called a truck.



24. Our subject is noted for providing the pilot an excellent all round view.



25. Unlike many of its type, our subject does not use hydraulic controls.



26. Some key elements of the controls are partially built from wood.



27. Our subject is noted for being extremely stable, yet still very responsive.



28. One version of our subject was specifically designed for hazardous operations.



29. Interestingly, the first aircraft built after production was resumed was delivered to China.



30. In some combat operations, hostile fire was avoided by flying at night at high altitudes.



31. The designer of our subject aircraft was part of a very famous operation.



32. His earlier designs were very successful and pioneered new tactics and methods.



33. The builder of our subject is an American company.



34. And their most famous design was named after a type of dog.



35. That first design (not our subject, though) first flew in 1947.



36. Which was the same year the designer arrived in the United States.



37. And it was initially purchased by the U.S. Navy.



38. Although the Marines and Air Force later followed suit.



39. It was used in the Viet Nam Conflict.
Old 08-25-2022, 04:48 PM
  #20878  
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So, K-Max? And Titan, for the unmanned version?
Old 08-25-2022, 06:48 PM
  #20879  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
So, K-Max? And Titan, for the unmanned version?
You got it, Al; congratulations! The Kaman K-Max, with its interlocking rotor blades, can lift more tonnage than much bigger and heavier helicopters. Its self hovering tendency makes it more stable and yet easier to maneuver. Over to you, Sir. Thanks; Ernie P.


What warbird do I describe?



1. This warbird has an amazing performance envelope.



2. Not, perhaps, in the conventional sense.



3. As much as anything, its amazing performance is due not to what it has, but what it doesnt have.



4. It was produced for a specific mission but has been used in many others.



5. It was in production for more than a decade.



6. Then out of production for more than a decade.



7. Before being put back into production.



8. It was put back into production because of the demand for new aircraft.



9. It has a very unconventional design.



10. But a design that was used quite some time prior to the later versions first flight.



11. But then again, the same designer designed both aircraft.



12. The designers first effort was widely hailed as being the safest aircraft of its time.



13. And the first of its type.



14. And a later version, with a different engine, became the first of a new type.



15. The earlier versions of our subject aircraft were used in combat.



16. In one war, an earlier version flew more of one type of mission than all other aircraft combined.



17. Our subject aircraft has served in a more recent conflict.



18. In both manned and unmanned versions.



19. The most notable feature of our subject aircraft is its controllability.



20. Another feature is its incredible load carrying ability.



21. Its empty weight is less than half of its fully loaded weight.



22. Using a different version of the same engine as a (perhaps more famous) +rival aircraft, our subject has a payload weight twice as heavy.



23. In fact, our subject aircraft is often called a truck.



24. Our subject is noted for providing the pilot an excellent all round view.



25. Unlike many of its type, our subject does not use hydraulic controls.



26. Some key elements of the controls are partially built from wood.



27. Our subject is noted for being extremely stable, yet still very responsive.



28. One version of our subject was specifically designed for hazardous operations.



29. Interestingly, the first aircraft built after production was resumed was delivered to China.



30. In some combat operations, hostile fire was avoided by flying at night at high altitudes.



31. The designer of our subject aircraft was part of a very famous operation.



32. His earlier designs were very successful and pioneered new tactics and methods.



33. The builder of our subject is an American company.



34. And their most famous design was named after a type of dog.



35. That first design (not our subject, though) first flew in 1947.



36. Which was the same year the designer arrived in the United States.



37. And it was initially purchased by the U.S. Navy.



38. Although the Marines and Air Force later followed suit.



39. It was used in the Viet Nam Conflict.



40. Where it flew more missions of a certain type than all other aircraft combined.



41. This was because of the aircrafts unique design, which gave it a unique stability in use.



42. In 1954, a joint experiment by the Navy and the builder resulted in the first of a new type.



43. That first effort served until the early 1970s.



44. The designer was German, and came to the U.S. as part of Operation Paperclip.











Answer: The Kaman K-Max







The Kaman K-MAX (company designation K-1200) is an American helicopter with intermeshing rotors (synchropter) by Kaman Aircraft. It is optimized for external cargo load operations, and is able to lift a payload of over 6,000 pounds (2,700 kg), which is more than the helicopter's empty weight.

An unmanned aerial vehicle version with optional remote control has been developed and evaluated in extended practical service in the war in Afghanistan.



After being out of production for more than a decade, in June 2015 Kaman announced it was restarting production of the K-MAX due to it receiving ten commercial orders. The first flight of a K-MAX from the restarted production took place in May 2017 and the first new-build since 2003 was delivered on July 13, 2017 for firefighting in China.



In 1947 Anton Flettner, a German aero-engineer, was brought to the United States as part of Operation Paperclip. He was the developer of the two earlier synchropter designs from Germany during World War II: the Flettner Fl 265 which pioneered the synchropter layout, and the slightly later Flettner Fl 282 Kolibri ("Hummingbird"), intended for eventual production. Both designs used the principle of counter-rotating side-by-side intermeshing rotors, as the means to solve the problem of torque compensation, normally countered in singlerotor helicopters by a tail rotor, fenestron, NOTAR, or vented blower exhaust. Flettner remained in the United States and became the chief designer of the Kaman company. He started to design new helicopters, using the Flettner double rotor.



The K-MAX series is the latest in a long line of Kaman synchropters, the most famous of which is the HH-43 Huskie. The first turbine-powered helicopter was also a Kaman synchropter.



The K-1200 K-MAX "aerial truck" is the world's first helicopter specifically designed, tested, and certified for repetitive external lift operations and vertical reference flight (Kaman received IFR Certification in 1999), an important feature for external load work. Other rotorcraft used for these tasks are adapted from general-purpose helicopters, or those intended to primarily carry passengers or internal cargo. The K-MAX can lift almost twice as much as the Bell 205 using a different version of the same engine. The aircraft's narrow, wedge-shaped profile and bulging side windows give the pilot a good view of the load looking out from either side of the aircraft.



The transmission has a reduction ratio of 24:1 in three stages, and is designed for unlimited life. The rotor blades (which turn in opposite directions) are built with a wooden spar and fiberglass trailing edge sections. Wood was chosen for its damage tolerance and fatigue resistance; and to take advantage of field experience and qualification data amassed from a similar spar on the HH-43 Huskie helicopter, built for the U.S. Air Force in the 1950s and 1960s. The pilot controls blade pitch with tubes running inside the mast and rotor blades to move servo flaps that pitch the blades, reducing required force and avoiding the added weight, cost and maintenance of hydraulic controls.



The K-MAX relies on two primary advantages of synchropters over conventional helicopters: The increased efficiency compared to conventional rotor-lift technology; and the synchropter's natural tendency to hover. This increases stability, especially for precision work in placing suspended loads. At the same time, the synchropter is more responsive to pilot control inputs, making it possible to easily swing a load, or to scatter seed, chemicals, or water over a larger area.



Thirty-eight K-1200 K-MAX helicopters had been built by 2015. As of January 2015, 11 of these were not airworthy or had been written off in accidents and five were in storage at Kaman; and in March 2015 the number of operational K-MAXs was 21. The production line was shut down in 2003.

Unmanned version



Kaman had been developing the Unmanned K-MAX since 1998. In March 2007, Kaman and Lockheed Martin (Team K-MAX) signed a Strategic Relationship Agreement (SRA) to pursue U.S. DoD opportunities. An unmanned mostly autonomously flying, optionally remote controlled and optionally piloted vehicle (OPV) version, the K-MAX Unmanned Multi-Mission Helicopter was developed for hazardous missions. It can be used in combat to deliver supplies to the battlefield, as well as civilian situations involving chemical, biological, or radiological hazards. A prototype of this was shown in 2008 for potential military heavy-lift resupply use, and again in 2010. In December 2010 the Naval Air Systems Command awarded a $46 million contract to Kaman for two aircraft, and in 2011 they completed a five-day Quick Reaction Assessment.

Restart of production line



In February 2014, Kaman revisited resuming K-MAX production, having recently received over 20 inquiries for firefighting, logging and industry transport requirements as well as requests for the military unmanned version. Ten firm orders convinced Kaman to put the design back into production again. As of 2014, the K-MAX line had flown 300,000 hours and cost $1,200 per flight hour to operate.



At Heli-Expo 2015 in Orlando, Kaman reported it continued toward reopening the production line. Kaman received deposits and the assembly line was restarted in January 2017. Kaman test flew the first K-MAX from restarted production on May 12, 2017.



The first new-build since 2003 was delivered on July 13, 2017 to Kaman's Chinese sales agent Lectern Aviation, which will deliver it to Guangdong Juxiang General Aviation, Guangdong Province for firefighting with the second to be delivered the following week. Due to production scheduling, Kaman needed to decide in 2017 whether to extend production beyond the first 10, and Kaman made the decision in June 2017 to produce a further 10 aircraft, reaching into at least 2019.



Building on a three-year autonomy experiment in Afghanistan with the US Marine Corps, Kaman is developing the K-Max Titan system, an optionally piloted variant for commercial customers to fly into dangerous zones like wildfires or natural disasters, and for long operation with no pilot rest, up to 100h until mandatory inspections. After FAA certification, the system could be fitted on new and used helicopters outside the factory. The Titan technology took its first flight in April 2021.

Operational history

A K-MAX has been used for demolition work by having a 1,400 kg (3,000 lb) wrecking ball as a slung load.



In December 2011, an unmanned K-MAX was reported to be at work in Afghanistan. On 17 December 2011, the U. S. Marine Corps conducted the first unmanned aerial system cargo delivery in a combat zone using the unmanned K-MAX, moving about 3,500 pounds (1,600 kg) of food and supplies to troops at Combat Outpost Payne. A third unmanned K-MAX in the U.S. was tested in 2012 to deliver cargo to a small homing beacon with three-meter precision. As of February 2013, the K-MAX had delivered two million pounds of cargo in 600 unmanned missions over more than 700 flight hours.



On July 31, 2012, Lockheed announced a second service extension for the K-MAX in Afghanistan for the Marines, then on 18 March 2013 the Marine Corps extended its use of the unmanned K-MAX helicopters indefinitely, keeping the two aircraft in use "until otherwise directed". At the time of the announcement, they had flown over 1,000 missions and hauled over three million pounds of supplies. Assessments for their use after deployment were being studied. The unmanned K-MAX has won awards from Popular Science and Aviation Week & Space Technology, and was nominated for the 2012 Collier Trophy.



On June 5, 2013, one of the unmanned K-MAX helicopters crashed in Afghanistan while resupplying Marines. No injuries occurred and the crash was investigated. Pilot error was ruled out, as the aircraft was flying autonomously to a predetermined point. The crash happened during the final stages of cargo delivery. Operational flights of the remaining unmanned K-MAX were suspended following the crash, with the Navy saying it could resume flying by late August. Swing load was seen as the prime cause. The investigation determined that the crash was not caused by mechanical problems, but by unexpected tailwinds. As the helicopter was making the delivery, it experienced tailwinds instead of headwinds, causing it to begin oscillating. Operators employed a weathervane effect to try to regain control, but its 2,000 lb (910 kg) load began to swing, which exacerbated the effect and caused it to contact the ground. The crash report determined that it could have been prevented if pilots intervened earlier and mission planners received updated weather reports; diverging conditions and insufficient programming meant it could not recover on its own and required human intervention.



At the 2013 Paris Air Show, Kaman promoted the unmanned K-MAX to foreign buyers. Several countries reportedly expressed interest in the system. The K-MAX supporting Marines in Afghanistan was planned to remain in use there until at least August 2014. The Marine Corps was looking into acquiring the unmanned K-MAX as a program of record, and the United States Army was also looking into it to determine cost-effectiveness. In theater, the aircraft performed most missions at night and successfully lifted loads of up to 4,500 lb (2,000 kg). Hook-ups of equipment were performed in concert with individuals on the ground, but Lockheed was looking into performing this action automatically through a device mounted atop the package that the helicopter can hook up to by itself; this feature was demonstrated in 2013. Other features were being examined, including the ability to be automatically re-routed in flight, and to fly in formation with other aircraft. The unmanned K-MAX was successfully able to deliver 30,000 lb (14,000 kg) of cargo in one day over the course of six missions (average 5,000 lb (2,300 kg) transported cargo per mission). Lockheed and Kaman discussed the purchasing of 16 helicopters with the Navy and Marine Corps for a baseline start to a program.





The unmanned K-MAX competed with the Boeing H-6U Little Bird for the Marine Corps unmanned lift/ISR capability. In April 2014, Marines at Quantico announced they successfully landed an unmanned K-MAX, as well as a Little Bird, autonomously using a hand held mini-tablet. The helicopters were equipped with Autonomous Aerial Cargo/Utility System (AACUS) technology, which combines advanced algorithms with LIDAR and electro-optical/infrared sensors to enable a user to select a point to land the helicopter at an unprepared landing site. The Office of Naval Research selected Aurora Flight Sciences and the Unmanned Little Bird to complete development of the prototype AACUS system, but Lockheed continued to promote the K-MAX and develop autonomous cargo delivery systems.



Both unmanned K-MAX helicopters in use by the Marine Corps returned to the U.S. in May 2014, when the Corps determined that they were no longer needed to support missions in Afghanistan. After deploying in December 2011, originally planned for six months, they stayed for almost three years and lifted 2,250 tons of cargo. The aircraft were sent to Lockheed's Owego facility in New York, while the service contemplated the possibility of turning the unmanned K-MAX from a proof-of-concept project into a program of record. Formal requirements for unmanned aerial cargo delivery are being written to address expected future threats, including electronic attack, cyber warfare, and effective hostile fire; these were avoided in Afghanistan quickly and cheaply by flying at night at high altitudes against an enemy with no signal degradation capabilities. Officials assessed the K-MAX helicopter that crashed and planned to repair it in 2015. The helicopters, ground control stations, and additional equipment are stored at Lockheed's facility in Owego. The two unmanned K-MAXs, designated CQ-24A, were to be moved to a Marine Corps base in Arizona by the end of September 2015 to develop tactics and operations concepts to inform an official program of record for a cargo UAV.



Lockheed Martin demonstrated a fire fighting version in November 2014, and again in October 2015, when it delivered over 24,000 pounds (11,000 kg) water in one hour. A casualty evacuation exercise was performed in March 2015 in coordination with an unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) and mission planning system.A medic launched the UGV to evaluate the casualty, used a tablet to call in and automatically land the K-MAX, then strapped a mannequin to a seat aboard the helicopter.


Specifications (K-MAX)



General characteristics

Crew: 1



Capacity:



6,000 lb (2,722 kg) external load at ISA +15 C (59.0 F) at sea level



5,663 lb (2,569 kg) external load at ISA +15 C (59.0 F) at 5,000 ft (1,524 m)





5,163 lb (2,342 kg) external load at ISA +15 C (59.0 F) at 10,000 ft (3,048 m)



5,013 lb (2,274 kg) external load at ISA +15 C (59.0 F) at 12,100 ft (3,688 m)



4,313 lb (1,956 kg) external load at ISA +15 C (59.0 F) at 15,000 ft (4,572 m)



Length: 52 ft (16 m) rotors running



Length of fuselage: 41 ft 9 in (12.73 m)



Width: 51 ft 5 in (15.67 m) with rotors running



Height: 13 ft 7 in (4.14 m) to centreof hubs



Empty weight: 5,145 lb (2,334 kg)



Max takeoff weight: 6,500 lb (2,948 kg) without slung load



12,000 lb (5,443 kg) with jettisonable slung load



Fuel capacity: 1,541 lb (699 kg) / 228.5 US gal (190 imp gal; 865 l)



Powerplant: 1 Honeywell T53-17A-1turboshaft engine, 1,350 shp (1,010 kW) flat rated for take-off up to ~29,000 ft (8,839 m) to increase transmission life



Transmission rated to 1,500 shp (1,119 kW)



Main rotor diameter: 2 48 ft 4 in (14.73 m)



Main rotor area: 3,669 sq ft (340.9 m2)



Blade section: - root: NACA 23012; tip: NACA 23011[82]



Performance



Never exceed speed: 100 kn (120 mph, 190 km/h) clean

80 kn (92 mph; 148 km/h) with external load



Range: 300 nmi (350 mi, 560 km) with max load



Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,600 m)



Hover ceiling IGE: 26,300 ft (8,016 m) at 6,000 lb (2,722 kg) AUW, ISA



Rate of climb: 2,500 ft/min (13 m/s) at Sea Level with flat-rated torque



Disk loading: 3.52 lb/sq ft (17.2 kg/m2)



Power/mass: 0.1045 hp/lb (0.1718 kW/kg)



Fuel consumption: 85 gal/h (71 imp gal/h; 322 l/h)[22]

Old 08-26-2022, 09:06 AM
  #20880  
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That was a tough one.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.
Old 08-26-2022, 02:41 PM
  #20881  
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Originally Posted by Top_Gunn View Post
That was a tough one.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.
You know, Al; that really tickles my memory. I remember reading something.... Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 08-26-2022, 02:56 PM
  #20882  
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I was thinking the same thing, Ernie. For now, let's go with the Hawker Typhoon, even though I know I'm probably wrong
Old 08-27-2022, 04:38 AM
  #20883  
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Not the Typhoon. Today's clue and a bonus clue below.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.
Old 08-28-2022, 07:28 AM
  #20884  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster that the aircraft it was meant to replace.
Old 08-29-2022, 04:27 AM
  #20885  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster that the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.
Old 08-30-2022, 04:55 AM
  #20886  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster that the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 08-30-2022 at 06:36 AM.
Old 08-30-2022, 05:00 PM
  #20887  
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How about the B-32 Dominator?
Old 08-30-2022, 06:47 PM
  #20888  
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Originally Posted by Hydro Junkie View Post
How about the B-32 Dominator?
You know, HJ; that was going to be my guess as well. I was thinking about the B-29 (because of clues 3 and 4); but then I realized the B-29 wasn't ordered until several years after the B-17s maiden. So, that would leave the B-32; which would seem to match all the clues so far. It even had the stability problems, until the original twin tails were replaced with a single "B-29 like" tail. Thanks; Ernie P.
Old 08-31-2022, 05:03 AM
  #20889  
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Not the B-32, although that's an excellent guess. As it happens, one of the "improvements" made to our target aircraft was replacing the twin tails with a large single tail, so the B-32 not only fits the clues so far pretty well, it fits an additional clue I could have used. So here's today's clue and two bonus clues (which will rule out the Dominator as a subject).

Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 08-31-2022 at 05:32 AM.
Old 09-01-2022, 04:58 AM
  #20890  
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Two clues today!

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.
Old 09-01-2022, 07:46 AM
  #20891  
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Sounds almost like the Douglas A-3 Skywarrior/B-66 Destroyer
I know the plane had issues until the wing was redesigned and the engines were replaced with the heavier J-57. There's an example of an EKA-3 on the deck of the USS Midway right now with the markings and insignia of VAQ-130, the squadron I was with during my two deployments on the USS Kitty Hawk in the mid 1980s. By that time, the squadron had transitioned to the Grumman EA-6B Prowler
Old 09-01-2022, 10:34 AM
  #20892  
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Not the skywarrior; bonus clue below.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.
Old 09-02-2022, 04:30 AM
  #20893  
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Two clues, or maybe one clue in two parts.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.

15. It was armed with cannons and machine guns. Some versions built by the ally of the country in which it was developed could carry rockets.

16. And all of them could carry bombs, too.

Last edited by Top_Gunn; 09-02-2022 at 06:45 AM. Reason: Add clue 16.
Old 09-02-2022, 05:16 PM
  #20894  
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Saturday clue a little early. It may give you an idea about where it was designed and where many of them were built.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.

15. It was armed with cannons and machine guns. Some versions built by the ally of the country in which it was developed could carry rockets.

16. And all of them could carry bombs, too.

17. It had dive brakes. Whether they were ever used in combat I don't know.
Old 09-04-2022, 05:28 AM
  #20895  
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Sunday morning clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.

15. It was armed with cannons and machine guns. Some versions built by the ally of the country in which it was developed could carry rockets.

16. And all of them could carry bombs, too.

17. It had dive brakes. Whether they were ever used in combat I don't know.

18. It had an internal bomb bay in the nose. It could carry two bombs weighing a little more than 1000 pounds each. The airplane it was designed to replace could carry bombs externally.
Old 09-05-2022, 04:25 AM
  #20896  
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Today's clue.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.

15. It was armed with cannons and machine guns. Some versions built by the ally of the country in which it was developed could carry rockets.

16. And all of them could carry bombs, too.

17. It had dive brakes. Whether they were ever used in combat I don't know.

18. It had an internal bomb bay in the nose. It could carry two bombs weighing a little more than 1000 pounds each. The airplane it was designed to replace could carry bombs externally.

19. It was a heavy fighter and ground-attack aircraft.
Old 09-05-2022, 05:02 AM
  #20897  
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Now it's sounding like a Mosquito or a P-38, that is until I go back to clue 15. Maybe the BF-110?
Old 09-05-2022, 08:34 AM
  #20898  
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You're getting very close, but remember, few of these were produced. Keep looking!
Old 09-06-2022, 04:30 AM
  #20899  
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I was thinking about not adding a clue and just waiting for Hydro to solve it, but here's a clue. But please don't anybody but Hydro solve it today, because he's so close it seems only right to give him a shot.

Looking for the name of a warbird.

1. Sometimes an aircraft design is so promising that a production contract is signed before the prototype has even flown. This was one of those aircraft.

2. Sometimes, and this was one of those times, ordering an aircraft into production before the prototype has flown isn't a good idea.

3. It was meant to replace an earlier aircraft which became well known and which served from the beginning of its war until the end.

4. Among other advances, it featured remote gun turrets.

5. Its design was begun even before the aircraft it was meant to replace had flown.

6. It was considerably faster than the aircraft it was meant to replace.

7. The first prototype was unstable in turns and even in straight and level flight.

8. The earliest models had a vicious stall which almost instantly became a spin under some circumstances. An early prototype crashed when its pilot could not stop the spin. Many changes to the design followed, but even after more than 100 aircraft had been built it still proved unsatisfactory. Nevertheless, full production was ordered because the aircraft it was meant to replace was suffering heavy losses.

9. Despite all these flaws, the airplane was ordered into full production and delivered to frontline units.

10. The pilots who received it disliked as much as the test pilots had, and so production was stopped after less than 10 percent of the airplanes that had been ordered were finished. However, an ally of the country in which it had been built considered it satisfactory and build a few hundred somewhat modified ones itself.

11. Production of the airplane our target was meant to replace had stopped, but it was re-started. The newer version of that airplane had better engines and heavier armament than the earlier versions, but the quest for a replacement continued.

12. A prototype of a revised version of our target aircraft was built and given a new designation. But the stability problems remained, so that project was cancelled.

13. The aircraft's stability problems were finally resolved by changes to the wing and the fuselage and by using more-powerful engines. The revised design was given a new designation, more than 1000 were built, and it served until the end of the war.

14. It had two engines and a crew of two.

15. It was armed with cannons and machine guns. Some versions built by the ally of the country in which it was developed could carry rockets.

16. And all of them could carry bombs, too.

17. It had dive brakes. Whether they were ever used in combat I don't know.

18. It had an internal bomb bay in the nose. It could carry two bombs weighing a little more than 1000 pounds each. The airplane it was designed to replace could carry bombs externally.

19. It was a heavy fighter and ground-attack aircraft.

20. As were the airplane it was deigned to replace and the last airplane in the series. Those two had considerable success as night fighters. Whether our target airplane was used as a night fighter I don't know, though had it not had so many problems it certainly would have been.
Old 09-06-2022, 05:07 AM
  #20900  
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Now wait a minute. As I see it, anyone can and should be able to answer this though, I'm thinking the ME-210 since the 110 was used as a radar equipped night fighter, the 310 never got past a single prototype while the 410 had roughly 1,000 see combat. It was taken on by the Hungarian Air Force and some were built in Hungary as the ME-210 Ca-1

Last edited by Hydro Junkie; 09-06-2022 at 05:28 AM.

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