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3D propeller printing.

Old 08-15-2022, 04:31 PM
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Joseph Frost
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Default 3D propeller printing.

Hello 3D print specialists, this is not my department but I find very difficult to buy certain size props, in this case extremely light (2-3 grams) at some 9 to 10 inch diam. with very low pitch like 2.3 to 2.8 as an examples. for micro light scratch build very slow flying models (100 to 150 grams AUW).
Just wondering if it could be made by 3D print for practical/reliable use?

Re-shaped modified props, still too heavy for my like as a sample.
Old 08-19-2022, 12:57 PM
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BMatthews
 
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The issue will be that the props will not be very strong compared to the commercial options. For the use you're looking at on those crazy 3D indoor style models like the one in the picture I'm sure that they would be just fine. But other than this specific application and perhaps rubber power free flight I would be afraid that blades would be at too much risk of flying off. Particularly if there was a ground strike that tweaks the blade in near the hub.

This would be the time to run destructive proof testing. Make your props and mount them to a much stronger motor capable of double the expected RPM. Use a wattmeter to run the "test mule motor" up to double the drawn power which should put the RPM up at around 1.5x or so of what you expect on the lightweight model. Be well back behind it during this. If it survives you can consider that design suitable for safe use at the lower RPM.

It actually sounds like a great idea. But just do the tests before trusting them. Granted a 1S motor with a huge prop isn't going to slice a jugular if the blade flies away. Likely not even a minor cut. But if it hits you or anyone else in the eye? That's a whole other level and even a slow big moving prop blade could do that sort of harm. So it's worth doing that sort of test just to be sure.
Old 08-19-2022, 03:52 PM
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Joseph Frost
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I'm more interested if anyone had done it and used it in application as I mentioned in my post above, but even more interested in its weight after 3/D print which perhaps might be lot more than I would like (2-3 grams) Anyone with 3/D print experience???
My intention would be to use it only in micro light models bellow 120 grams AUW.

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