Notices
Scratch Building, Aircraft Design, 3D/CAD If you are starting/building a project from scratch or want to discuss design, CAD or even share 3D design images this is the place. Q&A's.

painting

Old 12-27-2006, 11:43 AM
  #1  
rocannon
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: lawton, OK
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default painting

hi all,
i'm building a sig tri-star from plans ( the kit is long gone ) and i'm going to paint instead of using film.

can y'all point me to a good FAQ, How-To, or other resource where i can learn about painting?

thanks
frank
Old 12-27-2006, 12:38 PM
  #2  
Props4ever
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Mississauga, ON, CANADA
Posts: 4,196
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default RE: painting

Hi Frank,

It would be good starting point if you can post a picture that you want to replicate on you model, this way guys can see it and can guide you how to do lay one color on top or paint one coloor with other, i am sure you have painted before and you know how to mask and cover areas up, if not then RC model is not the best way to learn how to paint.[]
Old 12-27-2006, 07:35 PM
  #3  
rocannon
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: lawton, OK
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: painting

ah... there's the rub.
I haven't painted balsa models before. I always used heat shrink film. This time i want to paint.
i know about painting wood in a general sense... fillers, sanding 'tween coats, etc. I have some experience with airbrushes, and using frisket to mask, etc.

all i think i need is a bit of advice on fuel proof primers and finish paints, etc. And any techniques that are necessary for a good result, but not immediately obvious to the novice painter.

thanks
frank
Old 12-30-2006, 07:54 PM
  #4  
stupidaso
My Feedback: (14)
 
stupidaso's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Hayden, ID
Posts: 76
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: painting

I am doing a painting project for the first time too.

I know if you want a smooth surface, you can use 2 modest coats of polyester resin, such as Sig finishing resin. You can sand between coats, but make sure you sand thoroughly before painting. Remember that 90% of the finish's appearance is a direct reflection of the surface prep. I learned this painting cars.

I don't think you need primer if painting resin-treated wood, but I am new to this as well. I could be wrong.

As far as paint, I am looking for advice myself, so I am no help here. I would opt for using an airbrush over a spray can. More control and more consistent droplet size of the paint

Anyway, good luck.
Stu
Old 12-31-2006, 03:46 AM
  #5  
Stickbuilder
 
Stickbuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Leesburg, FL
Posts: 8,678
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default RE: painting


ORIGINAL: stupidaso

I am doing a painting project for the first time too.

I know if you want a smooth surface, you can use 2 modest coats of polyester resin, such as Sig finishing resin. You can sand between coats, but make sure you sand thoroughly before painting. Remember that 90% of the finish's appearance is a direct reflection of the surface prep. I learned this painting cars.

I don't think you need primer if painting resin-treated wood, but I am new to this as well. I could be wrong.

As far as paint, I am looking for advice myself, so I am no help here. I would opt for using an airbrush over a spray can. More control and more consistent droplet size of the paint

Anyway, good luck.
Stu
Unlike the finishing system used on cars, the material underneath the paint on model airplanes is not metal. The open areas (wings, tail surfaces, part of the fuselages allow light to pass through the paint, and therefore, an opaque primer is necessary. We used to use dope, and would use silver as a base primer to stop the light from passing through the surfaces. I now use an automotive system, and use primer to assist in filling the weave on my scale projects. You will sand the majority of the primer off, so weight build up is not a major consideration. The trick is in knowing how much pigmented material and the clear coat build-up to avoid making the model a heavy weight. In doing multi color jobs, I have found through experience that one needs to paint the darker colors first, and add the lighter colors in the order of pigmentation. Another thing to remember is to only use materials from the same manufacturer. The systems are not always compatible with each other. I am posting a couple of photo's of my last build (just completed) This one has an automotive system (DuPont) applied. While this is a simple single color job (with a little trim) it will give you the idea. I don't use any iron-on materials any longer. This one is covered with Koverall.

Bill, AMA 4720
WACO Brotherhood #1
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	Nl30992.jpg
Views:	27
Size:	94.2 KB
ID:	587182   Click image for larger version

Name:	Lg15924.jpg
Views:	11
Size:	143.4 KB
ID:	587183  
Old 12-31-2006, 10:24 AM
  #6  
skylarkmk1
 
skylarkmk1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Festus, MO
Posts: 2,031
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: painting

rocannon,

Check the Warbirds or Scale sections here on RCU or on RC Scale Builder http://www.rcscalebuilder.com/forum/default.asp . There is a thread on finishing in the General section of RCSB. If anybody knows how to paint it is the Scale guys. You will need to cover any open areas with Tissue, Fabric or film (Film can be painted), then fill the weave and/or grain of the structure with some sort of primer. I use to use clear dope (Aero Gloss) way back when with talcum powder to fill the grain, sanding between coats, then applied the color lightly and finish with a light coat of clear. For your first paint job, keep it simple with the materials. Latex is cheap, cleans up with water , has low oder and can be mixed to custom colors at places like Wal-Mart, Lowes, Home Depot and other places, but is not fuel proof and needs a coat of clear polyurathane to fuel proof.
Old 12-31-2006, 11:34 AM
  #7  
Campy
Senior Member
My Feedback: (1)
 
Campy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Baltic, CT
Posts: 3,613
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: painting

Latex needs to "cure" before you clear coat it.

Flat latex takes about 10 days to cure, semi-gloss and gloss can take as long as 3 weeks.

To see if the latex is cured, press your finger firmly on a hard spot (I use the cowl area ). If a fingerprint remains, it is not cured. (Don't worry about the fingerprint, it will disappear in a day or two )

For clear coats, do a search under Campy in the tips and tecniques forum. I have done some testing on alternatives to Lustercrap and Ultracote clear for fuel proofing.
Old 12-31-2006, 06:38 PM
  #8  
rocannon
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: lawton, OK
Posts: 15
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: painting

ah....
never thought of that.

thanks much!

frank

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.