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mildew problem

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Old 10-04-2006, 05:34 PM
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Flyboy40
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Default mildew problem


I have mildew growing in one of my planes,any suggestions on how to remove it?
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Old 10-04-2006, 05:39 PM
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Default RE: mildew problem

bleach will kill mildew but it need to be diluted with water about a 50/50 mix.
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Old 10-04-2006, 05:48 PM
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Default RE: mildew problem

Well,

Depending on where it is, your plane may be done. If not now, soon. Check to see if the wood is weakened, or if the covering is coming off. Mildew needs moisture. Dry it out with a heat gun and use rubbing alcohol to kill the mildew. Bleach is 98% water and will just make a soggy plane that smells like a public pool.
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Old 10-04-2006, 06:00 PM
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I just got the plane from my brother, I asked he said it got rained on, but not bad, he dried the outside but did not take the wing off, the wood is still stable I just need to get rid of it. The mildew that is.
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Old 10-04-2006, 06:06 PM
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bunk
Effect of Mildew on Wood

We have discussed some of the harmful effects that mildew can have on wood finishes. Mildew can also affect unfinished wood. In fact, it is often more of a problem with unfinished wood. The colored residue that mildew can deposit on a wood surface can cause severe discoloration; this discoloration can be a variety of colors but is most often gray or black. However, this mildew growth does not degrade the wood; mildew fungi are not capable of using lignin, cellulose, or hemicellulose for food. Therefore, mildew does not decrease the structural integrity of the wood. They can, however, use the nonpolymeric materials in wood, such as the extractives and natural oils for food. Wood species that are rich in natural extractives may be more prone to mildew growth than wood species with lower extractive content. Since mildew spores infect all surfaces, their growth can be limited only by controlling moisture, temperature, or using paint film mildewcides.

Solution #1 Bleach: This mixture is the old standard used for years. The chlorine kills algae, moss, and mildew. BUT - chlorine breaks down the lignin that holds wood together, causing excessive damage to otherwise healthy wood. Chlorine is dangerous, environmentally unsound, and likely to cause damage to surrounding greenery. If you must use it we recommend
a. 3 quarts water
b. 1 quart common household bleach
c. 1/4 cup maximum of liquid dishwater detergent (ammonia-free) or TSP(Tri Sodium Phosphate)

Solution #2 Safe & Effective: Sodium percarbonate (Disodium Peroxydicarbonate) (not to be confused with sodium bicarbonate)
Sodium percarbonate is an excellent detergent and bleaching agent based on hydrogen peroxide. It is a good cleaning and bleaching agent at normal temperature, and has strong fungicide effect. Fruits and vegetables treated with sodium percarbonate can be kept fresh, and be stored for a long time. In medicine, it can kill staphy lococcus, and colon bacillus .
This product is a white particle powder, non-toxic no contamination, non-flammable, non-explosive, easy to get damp, and soluble in water.
Hy-Tech Oxygen bleach,(sodium percarbonate) is excellent for cleaning and removing organic stains (such as coffee, tea, wine, fruit juices, foods, sauces, grass and blood) from fabrics, plastics, fiberglass, porcelain, ceramics, wood, carpets, asphalt, concrete, etc. Oxygen bleach can be used in any place in or around the house that need to be destained and deodorized; it is efficient, safe and economical. It is non-toxic, environmentally safe, biodegradable, and leaves no harmful by-products or residues which can harm the environment Except for industrial-strength cleaning or stripping jobs, sodium percarbonate is our hands-down choice for most average wood preparation jobs.
Mix 6-8 fl oz of Percarbonate in a gallon of warm or hot water. (2 fl oz per quart)

Bleach Safety Notes:
1. Do not mix bleach and ammonia. This mixture can result in hazardous, toxic vapors.

2. Precautions should be taken to protect shrubs and other areas that may be adversely affected by bleach.

3. Protect eyes and skin from contact with bleach solution.

Allow the solutions to set for 10-15 minutes to give time to settle into any crevices and hard to reach places, to kill all of the mildew present. Skipping this 10-15 minute set time may result in an inadequate job. The detergent is added in a small amount to help emulsify any mildew or dirt to aid in its removal. Liquid dishwasher detergent is the best choice because it will not foam like dry dish or laundry detergent. Most dry detergents are not easily washed off with cold water. Use of trisodiumphosphate (TSP) detergents is cautioned since the phosphate may actually serve as a food source for mildew and may actually promote future mildew growth.

4. Wash the substrate clean using a power washer. A second choice, if a power washer is unavailable, is to scrub the surface. For masonry substrates use a wire brush. For wood, use a softer bristle brush. For substrates sensitive to abrasive damage like aluminum and vinyl siding, use a sponge.

5. Use a garden hose to wash off any excess dirt, mildew, and loose substrate residue from the surface. Residue left behind can cause adhesion failures of the finish.
If mildew was present on the original substrate or previous coats, and a new finish coat is already applied, the mildew will grow through the new finish. If is usually impossible to stop mildew growth at this point. All the finishes must be stripped down to the original substrate and then cleaned as described above before applying a new finish coat.

obviously you do not want to use a garden hose etc but a light spraying and then let id dry in sunlight,best to remove the radio and engine before doing this.
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