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Old 06-12-2023, 06:53 AM
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Pixelazer
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Question Kit recommendations

Hello, chaps. One of my friends built (and spectacularly crashed) a Flite Test Spitfire, and watching him has given me the itch to do something similar, too. I want to buy a kit, but something simple to build and fly would be appreciated. My only experience with things like this so far has been making a (display-only) balsa model. Is it possible with a budget of $120? Would prefer all of the electronics and necessary parts would be included with the kit (or as part of a bundle)

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Old 06-12-2023, 08:44 AM
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mgnostic
 
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I guess the first question is: Are you currently an RC pilot. It sounds like you aren't but you can't always tell over the net. I don't mean to sound like I am knocking you if you aren't, It just drives the suggestions of what might give you the most success. $120 isn't going to get you much unless you already have a transmitter in hand. It is possible to build a Flite Test style airplane on a really tight budget but if there are any fliers local to you it is often better to pick up some used equipment.
Old 06-12-2023, 08:55 AM
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Pixelazer
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I am not currently an RC pilot. I have landed on the $120 sum because I have found a few Flite Test kits (transmitter included) being sold at that price point at my local hobby store. Don't know of anyone who has equipment for sale near me, I'll try looking again. Thanks for the advice.
Old 06-12-2023, 10:36 AM
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A Flite Test bundle is a viable way to get into the air. For the first airplane stick with something that is clearly described as a trainer. A couple of suggestions. If you go with Flite Test, as soon as you get the airplane go to Dollar tree or similar store and get some more foam board. Trace all the parts. It's cheap insurance and easier to do when the parts aren't all wadded up from your first crash. The Flite Test videos are good but if there is a local hobby store there is probably a local group of people who fly. Somebody in that group will be happy to help you learn to fly. You may run into a hobby elitist who will poop on foamboard, ignore them and keep asking around, the helpful people are out there. Many, if not most, flying clubs have a facebook page. The local hobby shop may be able to help. Look to see if there is a bulletin board or fliers for local events. Sadly, your buddy fell victim to one of the things that discourages many would be RC pilots. He was a sucker for a warbird. Been there, done that, came home with the wreckage to prove it. Warbirds are way cool but they are generally a bit too much for a new pilot.
Old 06-13-2023, 03:01 AM
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Pixelazer
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Appreciate the advice. What's your opinion on flying wings?
Old 06-13-2023, 07:23 AM
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mgnostic
 
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Originally Posted by Pixelazer
Appreciate the advice. What's your opinion on flying wings?
Flying wings are quite a kettle of fish. They can go from hardware store blue foam slow fliers that can tool around at walking speed all the way up to 180 mph deltas like the Diamond Dust. I watched one this weekend that was probably doing a minimum of five rolls per second. The point is that covers a huge range of airplanes. A properly designed and set up flying wing isn't really any more difficult to fly than any other airplane. I've flown foam board deltas, a Zagi and a couple of relatively hot glow powered plans such as the Holy Smoke and the Force One. The Zagi in particular was a pretty forgiving plane as it was an all foam wing covered in packing tape. It was primarily a powered glider. The biggest drawback of flying wings is the ability to maintain orientation. One of the skills you build as a new pilot is the ability to keep track of the orientation of the airplane. I've seen a number of new pilots struggle with this. When the airplane get a couple of hundred yards out it can be difficult to tell if it is coming or going. A flying wing doesn't have much if any fuselage so there is less visual indication of the airplane's orientation. Another issue is that flying wings don't tend to be self righting. A good trainer wants to fly straight and level and will do so if you let go the sticks. Flying wings tend to have neutral stability. That is, they will stay wherever you put them, even if that is pointed straight down. It's not necessarily a deal breaker, just something to keep in mind. I would steer you away from things like the Stryker wings. Not because there is any problem with quality but because they can be very fast. Flying model airplanes tends to be a walk before you can run kind of hobby but a lot of guys show up at the field with a ducted fan or a P-51 and want to jump right in and they end up like your friend with a spectacular crash and a trashbag full of disappointment. To sum, you can learn on a flying wing, just be sure to get one that isn't a rocket.

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