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What's A Good Beginner Kit?

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What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Old 02-03-2002, 02:57 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Hi, I am new to this forum. I plan to pursue RC flying as a hobby. What is a good kit for a beginner? Thanks.
Old 02-03-2002, 03:00 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Welcome to RCU!

The following link should help: http://www.rcuniverse.com/showthread.php?threadid=29180]
Old 02-03-2002, 04:34 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

After reading through this message board and others I went and ordered a sig lt-25. I love building things and want to try building one rather than the arf. I will give you a update as I go.

Matt
Old 02-03-2002, 05:13 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Congratulations on a good selection, and welcome to the Hobby. Hope you enjoy the building process, it gives much more pleasure to see a plane that I built fly. I'm sure if you run into any problems, someone here can help you. The next step is to find a flying club in your area, and join up. They can help you also, especially when it comes to flying your new plane. If their are any Hobby shops in your area, they can direct you to local clubs. If their aren't you can find clubs through AMA's web site. http://www.modelaircraft.org/templates/ama/
Old 02-03-2002, 07:21 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Originally posted by pkranger
After reading through this message board and others I went and ordered a sig lt-25. I love building things and want to try building one rather than the arf. I will give you a update as I go.

Matt
Should I find a RC club first, then get a RC airplane kit after I find a club?
Old 02-03-2002, 07:34 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Originally posted by Ptarmigan


Should I find a RC club first, then get a RC airplane kit after I find a club?
You don't *have* to find the club first, but you need to answer two questions: 1) Where can I safely fly this airplane, and 2) how will I learn to fly? For most folks, the easiest way to answer these is to find a club.
Old 02-03-2002, 09:38 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Ptarmigan,

If possible, I would try to contact a club if you don't already have a site picked out. If anything you should know if there are any airplane clubs around you "before" turning on a radio. There is a heli field just down the road from me, so I have to be careful with turning on my radio.

Also, they will be able to help you with the right radio. Hate to get a JR when everyone else has a Futaba

Welcome to the Hobby!
Old 02-04-2002, 10:50 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Another thing about contacting the club first... the folks there can advise you on building the plane if you hit any tough spots, want to knwo if it's smooth enough to cover, aren't sure if the flibnitz is mounted solidly enough, etc.
Old 02-05-2002, 04:19 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

There are lots of good trainer planes out there. Just look for a high wing, flat bottomed airfoil and trike landing gear, and you will do just fine. when it comes to a first time plane, Bigger is better. It will fly slower and be easier to see. Kit building is fun and rewarding, but i recomend that you wait until you master flying before you invest many hours in a plane. ARF's (semi prebuilt planes) are highly recomended, they are fast to build reasonably good quality and usually end up costing the same as one you build yourself (covering material and all the odds and ends you don't get in a kit can be expensive)

While you are a beginner, the plane will probably get knocked around a bit and won't last long, but the radios and maybe the engine will last years. Buy accordingly, If you can, try to get one of the better radios. Computer radios like JR 421 or 652 and some of the better Futaba have lots of very nice features which can make the plane a whole lot easier and fun to fly. The main feature to look for is the ability to link with a buddy box. If the plane you are interested in says it is rated for a 40 - 46 engine, get the 46. The extra power makes tuning and take offs easyer and you can always throtle back once you are in the air.

It is HIGHLY recomended to find a club! Without someone to take off and land for you the first few times, the odds of still having a flyable plane after the first day are pretty slim. Some clubs will let you fly a few times without actually becoming a member. Some clubs even have designated teachers. Some teachers bring donated trainer planes for folks to learn on. ( i am a keeper of a club trainer myself) All clubs will require AMA membership (for insurance reasons) it is about 40$ per year and it comes with a nice monthly magazine with reviews on available planes.

Another recomendation is for an RC flight simulator, a little time on a computer can get those clumsy thumbs doing precision control in no time. They cost 100 - 200$ but mine probably saved several planes. Even after a year or so i still use mine nearly every day. (its a fun toy).

well, best of luck to you.

Shmo
Old 02-05-2002, 04:41 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

shmo46,
Good comments.

One thing I wanted to mention on the engine size. One thing people forget, is if you live in a windy area go for the larger engine by all means. Nothing worse than turning into the wind and just hanging there without enough power to get back to the runway But flying backwards can be fun!
Old 02-05-2002, 05:25 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

1) Learn About RC Read about getting started in RC at this site: http://www.rcflightunlimited.com/

2) Learn About Aerodynamics Before you start flying, buy a copy of Stick and Rudder by Wolfgang Langweische.
http://www.tatteredcover.com/NASApp/...sbn=0070362408

This is the best book on PRACTICAL Aerodynamics ever written. It will teach you how and why airplanes do what they do in clear and easy to read language.

3) Build a simple airplane For about 2 bucks you can buy an AMA Cub or "Delta Dart". This amazing little rubber powered airplane can be constructed in about 15 minutes, and teach you some wonderful things about how to construct, trim and fly a model airplane. If you are helping your son or daughter get started in RC, buy him or her a Delta Dart first. If the model does not bring a smile to junior's face, model airplanes are probably not the right hobby.

4) Purchase your equipment You should be able to put together a good economy priced set up for flying gas powered RC for UNDER $350.

a) AIRFRAME There are a number of good airplanes out there, but for an easy building, sturdy, light weight, airplane that will carry you from beginning errors to beginning aerobatics, there is not a better choice than the Sig Kadet LT-25. This model will not only teach you some vital skills needed to repair, maintain, and fly your future models, it is a model that is truly a joy to construct with nearly all of the parts accurately laser cut and ready to install.


b) ENGINE The engines that are generally available in the market, OS, Thunder Tiger, SupreTigre, MDS, Tower, Irvine, etc, are all pretty good. They all have idiosyncracies, but there are not any that are "bad". If you are flying at an altitude higher than 6000 feet, it is a good idea to up your engine size slightly (a 46 instead of a 40, or a 32 instead of a 25), but it is not necessary. Remember that your goal is to learn to fly, and your first engine is going to take a lot of abuse. It may well be unusable after your first plane is worn out, so it is really a waste to buy a top of the line, high performance engine.

c) RADIO I generally recommend a basic four channel radio for beginners. This is the most economical way to go for several important reasons. First, the initial outlay is quite low. Second, most 4 channel rigs come with a seven channel reciever that is identical to the one supplied with the more expensive 6 and eight channel radios. Third whether you buy a four channel radio or a six channel radio, when you are ready to equip a second airplane you will want to buy a second flight pack. The cost of a flight pack is very close to the price of a complete four channel radio, in fact a number of modelers have found it cheaper to purchase a full four channel rig and discard the extra transmitter than to buy a flight pack only.

Whatever you do, do not buy anything less than a 4 channel radio, the two and three channel radios are very limiting. The four channel radios will fly most airplanes that are on the market.

Six channels will not be needed until at least your third model, and many people never use the 5th or 6th channel, but they do give you the ability to add acceesories like bomb drops, cameras, retractable landing gear and flaps to your advanced models.

Of the 4 channel radios, they are all basically the same in terms of price and quality, look to spend about $120-140.

If you are going to get a six, don't mess around with the bottom of the line, get one of the ones with multi model memory, otherwise there is no point in going beyond the basic 4 channel jobbie. Prices have stabilized recently. A good computer 6 from Futaba, JR, Airtronics or Hitec will cost you around $250. When you are ready to equip a second airplane, an additional flight pack compatible with either a four or six channel radio will cost between $120 and $160.

5) Join the AMA The AMA insures you for up to 2.5 million dollars if you kill someone with your airplane. This is important to protect your estate, or your parents if you are sued for wrongful death, but more importantly, it is to make sure that if you kill me with your airplane, my wife will not have to live in a refrigerator box and my kids will still get to go to college.

6) Track down your local club and join If you cant find a local club, call the AMA and find out the name of a local AMA member that will help you. I'm serious about this, DEMAND that the AMA put new flyers in touch with experienced modelers. Once you start getting your AMA magazine, find out who your local VP's or Assistant VP's are (they are listed in the back of the magazine) and call them to find someone in your area to help you, it is worth a long distance call to find a local modeler, and it is worth a two hour drive to have an experienced modeler help you trim out your first airplane.

Good Luck with your RC adventure
Old 02-06-2002, 08:00 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Of all the yrs of Training I've done the absolute best building and flying one I recommend to anyone I'm gonna be helping is the Midwest Aerostar. It comes in 20 , 40 or 60 size depending on your budget but bigger is easier to see. Other than that they all 3 fly the same. The kit comes with the most complete construction manual that you will ever see. Leaves nothing to the imagination. Try it! Mikey did and he liked it! Bill
Old 02-07-2002, 07:48 PM
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Default sig lt-25 update

Well I recieved my Sig lt-25 yesterday and just finished the left wing panel today. My modeling experince is limited to r/c cars and some r/c heli. I also built a Dynaflite wanderer when I was 14 (about 14 years ago). My observations so far:


1. The laser cutting that I have been reading about is awesome. I can remember one of the most tediour task for me on the wanderer was tracing around each rib with my x-acto to get them out. Due to my lack of skill I always ended up cutting too deep into a rib by wandering off the the die-cutting. The sig ribs fall out of the sheet and are very smooth around the edges.

2. The instructions and plans are very clear so far. Even a newbie like me was not confused to often. The little tips they include obvisouly had the beginner in mind, like takeing the pins out of the bottom sheeting before applying the top sheeting.

3. Everything fits together very nice. You littleraly building the wing and THEN glues everything, it fits together that nicely.

I am having a blast building this plane so far. So much so that I even called in sick to work on it a bit (sshhh, don't tell the boss) I will post more updates as I progress further on the plane.
Old 02-07-2002, 09:48 PM
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Default LT25 advise...

I built one of these for my son. Its such a great flyer I really don't plan on getting rid of it. A few things to make the plane from good to great that I did: 1.Since you are working on the wings, glue the 2 halves together with 1" less dihedral than the plans call for. I did this and the plane is terrific in the wind, stable, and fairly aerobatic(easy to do inverted flight around the field). 2.The kit gives you 2 6-32 bolts that you are supposed to use for the wheel axles. The lock nuts come loose and start rubbing against one of the tires making it imposssible to steer. Replace these with standard axles and wheel collars. 3.Use 3" Dubro Lite Weight tires for the mains. Makes handlying very nice on rough grass field. 4.This probably isn't necessary but I went up in size 1" tail wheel. The 3/4" as suggested is is so small that it doesn't even look like a wheel. At least you can see the 1". I also made a hatch for the fuel tank just to make it easier to get at but this isn't really required. I used an OS 32SX engine and the plane loves the combination. I can take off in 20 feet if I just hit the throttle or I can stretch it out to about 100 feet for an easy climbout. I know you will enjoy this plane.
Old 02-10-2002, 12:55 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

say I wanted to lessen the dihedral by a inch like you recomend. The problem is I have already built of the wings with the the 3 degree guage included in the kit. Now this is my first kit so is there a way to remove some of the dihedral or a way to remove the rib that determines the dihedral? From the way the intrstuction talk any gap between the wing halfs if very bad.

Thanks
Matt
Old 02-10-2002, 03:08 AM
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Default Wing dihedral

Since you have the wings glued together already, I would just leave it. Its very hard cut wings apart without making a pretty good mess after they have already been glued. For modifiying dihedral before the wings are glued is pretty simple. I found that most of the dihedral joiner pieces aren't all that tight a fit. It doesn't take much of a bigger gap at the middle to get an extra inch lower hihedral. I have only had to sand 1 joiner a bit to get the extra dihedral I needed. The rest of the joiner plates that came with the kits didn't need to be modified. I put a weight on the left side of the wing to keep it flat on the freezer(I mean work table) and a balsa piece to hold the I make a balsa piece to hold the right side of the wing at the right height for the dihedral. Glue together with 2 hr. epoxy. When it drys you will have a tight fit at the bottom of the wing and a slight gap at the top. If there is a big gap, say 1/8" or bigger I get scrap balsa, coat it in epoxy and fill the gap with that. When it drys, I fill any tiny gap that is left with epoxy. If the gap is small to start with, just fill it up with epoxy. Finish by getting a 4" wide strip of fiberglass and use thinned epoxy or Medium CA to glue it down over the centre so that 2" is on each side of the joint. If you use Ca, use a piece of wax paper under your finger to pat the CA into the fiberglass. Sand smooth when its dry before covering. I have had some pretty hard crashes and have never had a wing come apart yet.
Old 02-10-2002, 03:41 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

When you glass the center section, try using Ambroid glue. It has plenty of working time, and smooths out so well, you probably won't see the glass after covering. Ambroid is available from your LHS. Smooth it with your finger covered with plastic.
Old 02-14-2002, 12:40 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

I have only been flying for 7 months , but I think I flew an Easy Sport it flew great ,and it takes a beating. We would know we did give it a beating.
Old 02-22-2002, 09:21 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Hello all,

I am also a newbie, however I would like to start with a taildragger. It seems if I'm goin to learn I might as well start with a taildragger. I want to fly warbirds and that's how most of them are set-up. Any thoughts on this?
Old 02-22-2002, 09:55 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

blkbird.

Welcome to the hobby and RCU!

There is a thread on taildraggers, with pics. I feel it's fine to start with a taildragger, as long as you have someone who can help you.

Check out this link...

http://www.rcuniverse.com/showthread...threadid=36407]
Old 02-22-2002, 10:05 PM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

Hey Blkbrd

Tail draggers are usually a little tougher to get down the runway for take off, and you usually have to flair quite a bit for landings which can be tricky for a new comer too, but you can learn on a tail dragger if you insist, and it will probably turn out just fine for you, but a properly set up nose wheel will make the job a bit easyer, and you still can practice that flair landing with trike grear anyway. Some planes are set up so you can go either way. start with a trike then just switch over to tail drag.

If you go with nose wheel, setup is important, you want just about the lowest amount of movement of the wheel that can be achieved. (shoot for 30 foot turn radius) I usually drill a hole in the servo control horn closer to hub than the holes normally available. Also make sure the landing gear is bent back a bit so the wheel is slightly behind the turning axis.

if you go tail drag, might be a good idea to make a few practise passes up and down the runway, gun the engine, see how it behaves, and throttle back. it isn't very tricky after you have done just a few passes.

good idea to get someone who knows what they are doing to help you out with the first few flights. Pretty sure most of us who tried on our own, smashed a plane at first attempt. a little experienced help can improve your chances about 1000%.



best of luck!

shmo
Old 02-26-2002, 12:22 AM
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Default What's A Good Beginner Kit?

yeah what he said. a taildragger isn't to smart for just starting out, you'll just end up smashing it to bits, do what everypne does and get a trainer. thats what there there for to teach you how to fly, the smart thing to do would to get a trainer then later buy a taildragger just to save you some grief... but if your not gonna do that the pipercub would probably be the nearest to a trainer.

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