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Fuel cooking..is this normal?

Old 07-01-2009, 06:50 PM
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Jester241
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Default Fuel cooking..is this normal?

I got my poulan 46 up and running today,and still have a couple bugs to work out,its running pretty good. I noticed though while pouring gas into the carb to prime it(I have to get it sucking fuel better),the gas would instantly start cooking inside the carb barrel where the carb meets the metal cylinder. So my question is,is it normal for the engine to be hot enough to boil gas when it hits the metal? I was kinda afraid it would catch fire,and in turn catching my gassy hands and small amount of gas I was priming it with on fire too!
Old 07-01-2009, 08:57 PM
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w8ye
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Default RE: Fuel cooking..is this normal?

Do you have an insulator between the carb and engine?
Old 07-02-2009, 06:37 PM
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Nosedragger
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Default RE: Fuel cooking..is this normal?

If you are pouring fuel into the carb to prime it like that, you are doing it wrong, and no its not unusual for it to percolate fuel like that.

Doesn't matter what material the manifold is made from, the only reason they use plastic is for hot soak after running and letting engine sit and then attempting a restart. Once running the evaporation of the fuel will cool the intake to the point of collecting condensation depending on temp or even frost.
Old 07-02-2009, 10:35 PM
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Jester241
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Default RE: Fuel cooking..is this normal?

I found out today the choke works,it just take alot of flips to get the fuel pumped though and there are no issues anymore with the fuel cooking,lol. The engine also runs great swinging a 20x8 at about 7500rpms and an 18x10 several hundred more. The Poulan 46 is definetly worth coverting. Its a rail mounted engine with a compact crankcase,and side mounted carb and muffler. It required no grinding at all really. I used the flywheel center which was the first time I've done this and it turned out to be quite a pain in the butt trying to cut out the center with the magnets on one side of it and steel plates on the other,but I made it work. Although I liked the side mounted carb,I had to rig up 2 springs to hold the carb on because it doesnt bolt onto the engine,but that was no big deal because theres plenty of material to work with on the carb housing. I was also able to use the stock muffler although I had to modify it some,but its better then getting a muffler made and welded up. Anyway......its a good motor and I'd convert another one anyday if I need a 46 sized engine. I did have to adjust the timing a few degrees + or - from the initial 28 degree point to get it to run without a missing at full throttle.
Old 07-06-2009, 08:42 AM
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LawHound
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Default RE: Fuel cooking..is this normal?

Use A Hole Saw in A Drill Press. then dress it up in a Lathe if you have one. If not mount it on an old broken Crankshaft chuck it in your drill and use sandpaper to smothe it down. Doug.

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