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DLE 111 Engine

Old 07-13-2009, 07:41 PM
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Meekskin
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Default DLE 111 Engine

I am thinking of buying the DLE 111 gas twin engine from hobby city. Does anyone have any experience with this engine?...Sure would like to hear any comments, good and bad about it. This company is in China but my experience on other items has been good.
Old 07-13-2009, 09:12 PM
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Tired Old Man
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

I'll let you know tomorrow after I fly mine. The 100 is a good little engine so the 111 has a better thyan even chance of being the same. I strongly suggest you buy from a U.S. dealer. A little more expensive but always there if you need help or service. Both Valley View R/C and Wild Hare R/C are great companies to deal with.
Old 07-13-2009, 09:19 PM
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gboulton
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Have nearly 2 gallons through mine in a WildHare 102" Edge. So far, EXCELLENT performance.

Started well and turned 6600 RPM on a Wild Hare 27B prop right out of the box. It's taken very little tweaking since, is coming around very nicely, and now does nothing but start and run reliably.

2 others in my club have had similar experiences...good power, good reliability, ease of use. One of those has well over 10 gallons through it now.

My only suggestion would be :

If you buy one, purchase from a factory authorized dealer here in the US. WildHare is one of them, and their reputation for service is legendary, and for good reason. valley View RC is another with a sterling reputation. There are others, of course, but those are the two that come to mind.
Old 07-13-2009, 09:22 PM
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Tired Old Man
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Speaking of that 27b prop. I should be meeting with Tom tomorrow with a prop suggestion that will make what you have even better. I have one of them as well.
Old 07-13-2009, 10:19 PM
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flatspinjim
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

T.O.M, which plane are you putting the 111 on?
Old 07-13-2009, 10:44 PM
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Meekskin
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Sounds like everyone is having a good experience with this engine. So I will probably buy one. Now I just need to decide where to get it. I like to support U.S. companies so its just a matter of determining who has the lowest price. Let me know what plane everyone is putting this engine in.
Old 07-14-2009, 08:32 AM
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Tired Old Man
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

The DL 100 is coming out of my 35% Edge, replaced by the 111. I was made an offer I couldn't refuse
Old 07-14-2009, 08:54 AM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine


ORIGINAL: Meekskin
Now I just need to decide where to get it. I like to support U.S. companies so its just a matter of determining who has the lowest price.
All the factory authorized dealers will generally have the same price on the DLE-111...that's part of their agreement. You might find sales or package deals with an airplane, but one FA dealer isn't going to undercut another. You can certainly get the engine cheaper elsewhere, but you'll be giving up the warranty service, the backing of the dealer, etc.

Let me know what plane everyone is putting this engine in.
As mentioned above, mine's in a WildHare 102.5" WS 35% Edge 540, and absolutely kicks *** in it.
Old 07-14-2009, 12:23 PM
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flatspinjim
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

I've got a DL 100 in my W/H Extra and it has run flawlessly! I have a DA 100 in my W/H Edge but haven't gotten to fly it yet. [:@] I'm really curious to see the differences in them myself.
Old 07-14-2009, 05:03 PM
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Meekskin
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Mine will go in a wild hare 35% giles 202 and will replace my 3w 75. It will be the same weight but a lot more power.
Old 07-14-2009, 10:16 PM
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Tired Old Man
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Oh yea! A lot more power!

Nice thing about the DLE 111 is that if you had been using a DL 100 it drops right in without changing anything. I got a couple of flights in on mine today. Too new to say a lot other than it was easy starting and had plenty of power. Unfortunately I used the carb off the old 100 I had in the plane and it must have injested someting into the high speed circuit. That ended the day until I can clean it out. The reason for using the old carb you ask? It was easier to drop 2 screws out of the new carb and replace it with the old instead of disconnecting the throttle linkage. Had I been just a little less lazy about the deal....

The 111 is smoother than the 100 for sure. Seems to idle a little lower without complaining about it. As noted, mine's a little too new to tell but it shows a lot of promise.
Old 07-14-2009, 10:39 PM
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flatspinjim
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

The smoothness is the only complaint about my DL 100.
Old 07-14-2009, 11:11 PM
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Meekskin
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Sounds like you had a somewhat good day. I will be ordering my 111 either this week or next. A few specials being offered now so I will see what I can get for free. I do think I am getting the right motor and saving a lot of money.
Old 07-17-2009, 12:37 PM
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rcplanenut
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Check out TroyBuiltModels they offer a 2 year warrenty on the DL111
Old 07-26-2009, 12:18 PM
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Bob Pastorello
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Can someone confirm whether or not the DLE 111 prop hub holes match the DA 100? And does the mounting footprint match the DA 100??
TIA
Old 07-26-2009, 06:15 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine


ORIGINAL: flatspinjim

The smoothness is the only complaint about my DL 100.
The fact I only have 1 is my only complaint with my DLE-111
Old 07-26-2009, 10:49 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Bob the bolt pattern and footprint of the DLE111 are the same as the DA/DL-100.
Old 07-27-2009, 06:23 AM
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Bob Pastorello
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Thanks, Doug.
Old 07-27-2009, 07:23 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Bob,
Interesting thread.
If you have not already done so, I would also recommend putting baffles at the cowling intake, straight at the cylinders.
I have just done that on my RCGF 100cc twin and temps came way down and power in the verticals increased noticeably.
Just my 2c worth.
Old 07-27-2009, 07:58 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Ok...I have a question about baffles, and the use of them.

The common theory seems to be, as Rodney posted above, to use baffles to direct the air "right at the cylinders". In fact, i've seen many suggest that the baffles should point straight at the "center" of the cylinders. This makes no sense to me.

I've always been under the impression that the purpose of fins or blades on any sort of heat sink/radiator/cylinder/etc was to increase total surface area. The more surface area an object has, the more area there is presented to the cooling air flow, and the more area there is over which heat exchange may occur.

That being the case, don't we want the air directed over the ENTIRE cylinder, NOT just at the center? To over simplify, if i have, say, 10 sqin of surface area that i wish to cool, don't I want air moving over all 10 sqin, and not just over a discreet part of it?

It strikes me, then, that baffles might be appropriate if the air inlets would allow air to bypass the cylinders completely (say, inlets much larger than the face of the cylinder(s)), or perhaps may not expose some parts of the cylinder(s) to air (say, inlets well above or below the exposed face), but should, in such a case, be "aimed" at the top and/or bottom of the cylinder(s), not directly at the middle. In cases where the air inlets are directly in front of the cylinders, and of roughly equal size, it would seem appropriate to leave them as is.

Am I missing some key physics here??
Old 07-27-2009, 08:28 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

If you had your "druthers" you would have air directed at the cylinder in such a way that it provided flow from the bottom of the exhaust port to the top of the cylinder fin. If you had to sacrifice any flow to the cylinder, the side opposite the exhaust port could suffer a little less airflow than the exhaust port side.

It's not just air "in" that is going to make the difference. How the air is directed "out" matters as much or more. You can have 100m/s airflow through the jug but if that air does not have a well defined exit it won't do a lot of good. So a duct to bring the air in, a ramped duct to direct the air out, and a low presure zone to assist the out flow.
Old 07-27-2009, 08:57 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

pat is right, the purpose for the horizontal separator is to eliminate hot air reversion from the exhaust side to the upper side.

Two things to remember when visualizing air flow inside a cowl are these: 1) We cannot direct the air so much as "exclude" it from a certain area, and 2) we cannot "push" the air from one location to another, but we CAN "suck" it from point to point.

Effectively we have a high-pressure area immediately aft of the prop, at the cowl entrance. The path the air takes from that point depends upon the pressure differential. If we have a lower pressure inside the cowl, the high-pressure air WILL flow that direction. If we can further create a suction at the cowl exit, then the air within the cowl WILL flow out. If we have a pressure buildup at any point within the cowl this flow will be interrupted. The total pressure differential may be less than 1/2 psi, but it is enough to get the job done. It helps to place a lip on the forward edge of the cowl exit, and then work forward from there.

When it comes to baffles one thing to keep in mind is any time we ACCELERATE the airflow, the local air pressure DROPS due to Bernoulli's principle.

The best baffle will exclude any airflow that does not travel directly through the cooling fins.
Old 07-27-2009, 10:19 PM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Ooops, looks like I posted on the wrong thread!
I meant to reply to Bob's thread on cooling. Sorry about that and thanks for not flaming me off the planet!

It strikes me, then, that baffles might be appropriate if the air inlets would allow air to bypass the cylinders completely (say, inlets much larger than the face of the cylinder(s)), or perhaps may not expose some parts of the cylinder(s) to air (say, inlets well above or below the exposed face), but should, in such a case, be "aimed" at the top and/or bottom of the cylinder(s), not directly at the middle. In cases where the air inlets are directly in front of the cylinders, and of roughly equal size, it would seem appropriate to leave them as is.
I basically followed Dick Hanson's advise on cooling a twin. The theory being that on some, not all, cowl designs most of the air flow passes straight to the exit opening rather than into the cylinder fins, so would benefit from inlet baffles.
Some manufacturers (Aeroworks) recommend baffles on their 100cc sized Extras.
As gboulton mentioned above, others (Hanger 9 35% Extra 260) have have the cylinders placed directly at the cowl intake, so don't need baffles.
Old 07-28-2009, 07:34 AM
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

Pat, and BTerry,

First, thanks for the lessons in how the air moves through the cowl. It's all pretty "obvious", but i must admit to never having really thought about it as a pressure differential exercise...makes planning airflow a good bit easier.

However...either I'm still blank on something (Entirely possible...I was, after all, educated in Kentucky), or perhaps I didn't phrase my question correctly...as I don't believe I've found an answer yet in either of those posts. (Entirely possible it's there, and I just don't realize it.)

Both of you discuss HOW we can move the air through the cowl, and the necessity of using pressure differential to accomplish that...and I agree with everything you've said...at least as much as my knowledge will let me. *heh*

However...the question was more (at least in my mind) an "engine question"...

Don't we want air moving (however we manage to get it to move) over the entire cylinder, rather than an given part of it (Like the center).

Put another way...isn't ANY airflow (regardless of how it's created) that bypasses some of the cooling fins less than optimal? I understand Pat's point that if we must choose, there are more or less beneficial areas...but isn't optimal to not have to choose...to cover the entire cylinder?
Old 07-28-2009, 11:25 AM
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BTerry
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Default RE: DLE 111 Engine

There are a couple of good pictures and ideas on this website: http://www.geistware.com/rcmodeling/...es/baffles.htm

In the upper photo showing the seperator plate, notice that air can still travel THROUGH the lower engine fins, but not AROUND them. This is an important distinction. It doesn't matter at all how much air flows through the cowl if it isn't directed THROUGH the fins (or rather excluded from everywhere BUT the cooling fins...).

I also like the flat plate with the "fence" behind the cylinders, and plan to install something similar on my own twin (BME 110). As you notice the air inside the cowl will be excluded from all areas above the baffle, and subsequently guided downward aft of the cylinders to the cowl exit.

There are a couple of good pictures on this site too: http://www.aeroconversions.com/produ...ing/index.html . Notice how (on the VW engine) the horizontal seperator plates and fence aft of the cylinders force as much air as possible to flow DOWNWARD through the fins.

Setting up baffles to enhance downward flow will pick up the forward, aft, and upper side of the cylinder, and with good extraction we will also pull hot air from the exhaust side away from the engine.

Does this help at all or is it just more confusing?

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