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Tactic rx voltage sensitivity

Old 04-16-2014, 12:39 AM
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Default Tactic rx voltage sensitivity

Hello,
I bought a Tactic 650 radio as a reliable upgrade to my "starter" FlySky
T6. So I soon began to use the Tactic in place of the FlySky, and here is
what I have found in the past 3 months:

1) After an hour and a half or so if I waggel the stick its apt to lose link and go
into lockout, until a battery disconnect reconnect (I use 4 AAA alkaline batterys).
2) after 2 and a half hours or so plugging in the battery and subsequent
servo initialization will cause a no link, lockout situation (this is around 5.3V).

My Flysky T6 lets me fly glitch and lockout free for 3-4 hours then the servos start
humming and chatering, at which time I change the batterys.

The real eye opener was when I put hxt900 servos into my latest plane and turned it on to check the function.
Wagging the stick killed the link, not to come back until unplugging and plugging the battery
back in again. I tried all 3 Tactic receivers and got the same response. I swapped out
the Tactic receiver for a Flysky and it worked fine, no problem. The battery I used was
fairly new and the voltage was at 5.6 V.

I have come to the conclusion that the Tactic receivers are too voltage sensitive
to operate reliably and safely for me in my situation (AAA alkaline batterys?). I don't need or want to
worry about my planes and others property whenever I fly.

My options at this point are:

1)Replace the receiver.
Is there any other compatible rx out there?

2)Replace the radio.
The radio has a warranty, but its obvious Tactic(?) isnt going to re-engineer a new rx just
for me, so is there a possibly of exchanging the tx and rx for another? (non Tactic).

3)Return the radio and get my money back.
I bought it at Tower Hobbies, but its past the 90 day return time because it took
time to find this glitch. Can you wave this return time so I can return my tx and rx's
for refund?

In a bind,
Scott
Old 04-16-2014, 06:21 AM
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Well, to start, there's likely absolutely nothing wrong with your Tactic system. The problem is that you are using alkaline cells in the airborne system. Alkalines are really not suited for such a use, because the servos in the airborne system can draw quite a bit of current momentarily, which causes a voltage drop. You should be using cells that can deliver more current, such as NiCd, Lithiium, or even some NiMH cells. Because your difficulty is happening after the cells have had quite a bit of their charge depleted, there isn't a lot of reserve when the servos pull the current they need so you get enough of a voltage drop to cause difficulties.

This is not considered any kind of defect in the system, itself. You just need to use a proper power source for your airborne system. Alkalines work well in the transmitter because it does not have the transient variations in voltage that the airborne system has.

For any kind of exchange, credit, or refund, there would have to be an actual defect in the product. In this case, it's really not the product that's at fault.

We are not at all familiar with the servos you are using, so cannot comment about the influence they have on the performance of your system.
Old 04-17-2014, 01:50 AM
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Hi,
I understand what your saying, but its not true with my FlySky which works with no
problems under the same conditions.....meaning its not the servos.
This tells me the Tactic rx is not suited for glider use because of the inherent
need for smaller batteries.
This tells me I bought the wrong radio (at my unknowing expense).
I mean I really thought any good radio would perform better than a 30 dollar FlySky.

I fly only gliders so I use small batteries, and my current build calls out for 150mah
4 cell NiMh.. something I woundn't trust with a Tactic rx.

I do have 1 pack of 4 AAA 750mah NiMh batteries I have used and they are no different
than the alkalines that I can tell.

So the only way it seems that you could help is to tell me why the FlySky rx works
and the Tactic rx doesn't, so maybe I'll know what to look for in my next radio.

I can also understand a different rx using more current and shortening flight time, which
is something I could live with, but in the Tactic rx low batteries will unpredictably
cause lockout and loss of a plane. I can't have fun flying under such worrying
conditions. Its the way the Tactic rx doesn't recover from a brownout is the unacceptable problem.

Where as with the the FlySky rx the servos start to chatter giving me plenty of warning and
telling me its time to change batteries. This is how it should be , no guessing games, no lockouts,
no problem.

Scott

!
Old 04-17-2014, 06:20 AM
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Which Tactic receivers are you using? Your posts don't say.
Old 04-18-2014, 03:16 AM
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Hi,
I'm using the Tactic TR624 2 I received with the transmitter and one I bought separately

Scott.


!
Old 04-18-2014, 08:38 AM
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To get the TR624 to have a voltage dropout, you're having the voltage drop below 3.3V, which is the threshold voltage for that receiver. Most servos will also drop out at about that voltage, so a loss of control would not be surprising. Other brands of receivers with different designs, may have different voltage thresholds.

Again, we maintain that using dry cells (alkalines) is part of the problem. They just cannot sustain voltage when sudden current demands are put upon them, which makes them particularly bad to use as the airborne power supply. You would not see such a difficulty with NiCd, NiMH, or lithium battery packs, unless they are nearly discharged.

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