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Fiberglassing

Old 08-21-2002, 09:33 AM
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Default Glassing A Plane

The less resin you use, the less likely the fiberglass is to shift after you've got it on. Excess resin lests the cloth slide, shift, sag....

You can get a finish similar to fiberglassing, but lighter by using silk and yellow glue mixed 50-50 with water. Its cheaper, easier to prevent wrinkles and sags and... its easier to correct sags and wrinkles if they do occur. Since the TF kit doesn't need the strength added by glassing (and the silk adds almost as much strength anyway...) Its an option you should consider.

The filler for sanding... mix some corn starch into yellow glue, or Elmer's "Weather Tite Wood Glue" (which is a gel of yelow glue and finely ground wood fibers, and is sandable.)

www.thaisilk.com has good prices (it was well under $3 a yard {48 or 54 inch wide, not square} for "10 mm Habotai" {which is the right stuff} when I last bought some)
Old 08-21-2002, 03:50 PM
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Default Glassing A Plane

I'm probably going to be called an idiot for this, but it worked on the center section of my Dominator. Take some clear plastic wrap, like Saran wrap, and smooth it over the wet glass AFTER you have smoothed all of the bubbles and excess epoxy out with an old credit card. Make sure there arent any wrinkles in it. Let it dry, peel the plastic wrap off, and you now have a mirror smooth finish.
Old 08-21-2002, 06:22 PM
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Default Glassing A Plane

Just don't have excess resin in the glass with that Saran Wrap trick... or you end up with "waves" in the surface.

Its not a bad trick to use.
Old 09-16-2002, 09:32 PM
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Default Fiberglassing

I use West System 105 epoxy resin and hardener. If you are doing a small aircraft, you can use Z-Poxy as it works very well.
I start by laying out my 3/4 oz. cloth over the surface to be covered, much like you would begin monocoting a wing. Leave about an inch and a half all the way around. I smooth out the glass with a soft two inch wide paint brush, brushing out lightly from the middle. Once I have all of the wrinkles out of the cloth, I mix up some resin and pour it into a shallow pan. Using a foam touch up paint rolled, about 4 inches wide and 1 inch in diameter, I roll the resin onto the glass, again spreadind from the center outward. If I get a wrinkle in the cloth, I just pull the cloth with a sidewards motion of the roller, until I get the wrinkle out. Roll out the resin until you get a uniform look to the cloth, making sure you have applied enough resin over the cloth not to have any dry spots. I place it on the side to dry overnight. The next day, I sand off the edges and do the same process on the top of the wing, overlapping the edges slightly. Once you get used to rolling the resin over the cloth, you will not pull the cloth up with the roller and will be able to get a nice even spread of resis over the cloth. After the first coat of resin has been applied on both sides of the wing to adhere the fiberglass cloth, I take the shine off the resin with a scuff pad and apply a second coat of resin, this time spreading it very thin over the entire surface, one side let dry, and then the other, and let dry. After two coats of resin, you can sand the surface smooth starting with 180 grit and finishing up with 220. I then apply a heavy coat of automotive filler primer and block sand until it is almost all off. This leaves the filler in the low spots and removes it from the high spots, giving you a nice smooth surface. I now apply a second coat of filler primer and again sand to where almost all of the filler primer is sanded off.Before you apply the filler primer, be careful not to sand through the resin and into the cloth, but if you do, not a problem, just apply another small piece of cloth and resin and let dry. Sand smooth again when the resin has cured.
It is really not hard at all. It may be a little messy, but it gives you a really great surface to continue with your finishing methods and is very strong. Bayou Boys Building Service has a web site in which he describes the method above. If you email me, I can give you his web site address.
I've attached a picture of my Bearcat wing under construction so you can see what the wing looks like after the application of the second coat of resin. Good luck

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