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Airplane Recommendations

Old 08-02-2014, 08:13 AM
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bwells14
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Default Airplane Recommendations

I'm looking for my first rc airplane. I'm 30 years old. I want something I can handle, but I don't want a cheap child's toy that limits me too much either. I've done a little bit of research. The HobbyZone Firebird Stratos comes up a lot, but I don't know anything about the hobby, so I don't know what to think. Any suggestions?
Old 08-02-2014, 12:46 PM
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a70eliminator
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If your serious about learning to fly RC get yourself a 40engine size high wing trainer kit of balsa construction, buy the suggested motor and build it yourself, that way when you crash it at least you'll know what it's going to take to get it airworthy again. My friend bought one of those plastic snap together models with battery motor and radio, he brought it to me ready to fly and put it up into the sky, it was real handfull even for an experienced flyer and I don't see how the heck they ever think a beginner could fly it, i would suggest to stay away from those type kits.

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Old 08-02-2014, 12:47 PM
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Hey!

I've heard a lot of good things about the Stratos, but you may want to consider something that doesn't rely on entirely unique components. If something breaks (rest assured, it will), you don't want to be locked into a single manufacturer, especially if none of the parts are carried locally. If you crash it, you won't be able to carry the components over to another airframe very easily, either.

I'd recommend the Hobbyking Bixler as a first model. It's basically an EasyStar clone, but a lot cheaper, and can be easily repaired and modified. Also, it's a bit bigger, which is what you want for a trainer. Standard micro servos are used for all the control surfaces, which are cheap and easy to find, and there's an enormous online body of resources for repairs, modifications, etc. As long as the control throws are kept low, it's one of the easiest flying models I've come across, and can easily do most aerobatics when you are ready for it.
It glides great, too, and with some careful throttle management will stay up for about 15-17 minutes on a single charge. I'd suggest picking up another 1400 mAh 3 cell pack so that there is no down-time between flights.


http://www.hobbyking.com/__16544__Bi...00mm_ARF_.html

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Old 08-02-2014, 09:33 PM
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Originally Posted by a70eliminator View Post
If your serious about learning to fly RC get yourself a 40-engine size high wing trainer kit of balsa construction, buy the suggested motor and build it yourself, that way when you crash it at least you'll know what it's going to take to get it airworthy again. My friend bought one of those plastic snap together models with battery motor and radio, he brought it to me ready to fly and put it up into the sky, it was real handfull even for an experienced flyer and I don't see how the heck they ever think a beginner could fly it, i would suggest to stay away from those type kits.
100% right on! Serious entry into the hobby is going to take a few $$$$ - sorry, that's just how it is if you're interested in more than the local toy store's wares. Buying a kit does 2 things for you right away - you learn how & why things work, and you learn how to fix them on those occasions where everything doesn't quite go perfectly right. There's a 3rd factor too, you appreciate the plane more when you build it yourself - it's no longer "just a toy", it's a miniature FLYING aircraft that's capable of anything a full-size plane can do, sometimes more capable.

For my money, best high-wing .40-size trainer ever developed is the SIG Kadet. To learn with, I'd recommend the LT-40 version - it's simpler to build, simpler to repair, and incredibly strong. It's also very easy to learn with, very forgiving. You can see it from their website here: http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmar..._20Trainers_01

My own personal favorite of the Kadet series is the Mark-II. She's about the same size as the LT-40, same power, but a bit more complex to build and not quite as forgiving for a completely novice flier. You might think of her as a second plane, once you've got the LT40 going good. Her page is at http://www.sigmfg.com/cgi-bin/dpsmar..._20Trainers_01

Before anything though, I'd like to suggest just a bit of research - a road trip. Find the nearest Academy of Model Aeronautics (AMA) - backed local RC club, and go talk to them and see what they can do for you too. AMA is the organization that regulates, protects and insures fliers - most RC clubs will require that you join AMA to fly with them. However, even if you're like me (with no clubs closer than 50 miles) you'll definitely want to join AMA. I, myself, have been a member for 40+ years - wouldn't fly without it.

When you visit the local club, pick their brains. Believe me, most fliers LOVE to talk "planes", and you can learn more from them in an afternoon than you could by going through a month's worth of classes (if such things existed). The club will probably have instructors to help you too, which further strengthens the probability of success right off. Early success if the most important thing of all - do everything you can to attain it.

Hey, welcome to a GREAT hobby/sport/addiction. Take your time, learn it right, you'll have DECADES of fun.

And remember, there are a lot of guys right here to call on - any time.
Old 08-03-2014, 02:42 AM
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Originally Posted by a70eliminator View Post
If your serious about learning to fly RC get yourself a 40engine size high wing trainer kit of balsa construction, buy the suggested motor and build it yourself, that way when you crash it at least you'll know what it's going to take to get it airworthy again. .
I concur.

The other day was a perfect day for flying. There was little wind, but the guy with the Stratos was complaining about how windy it was. Watching it fly, I could see why.

In my opinion, there isn't much good to say about that airframe.

My club's head instructor really likes the Apprentice. http://www.horizonhobby.com/products...nology-EFL3100 While it's not my thing, it does fly well, and I've seen success with novice pilots using it.

Sig Mfg has a fine line of kit and ARF traners. Most are suitable for electric or glow power. At the moment, I'm flying a Kadet Sport ARF which is an excellent trainer, but is still a fun airframe to fly after advancing past that stage. http://www.sigplanes.com/SIG-Kadet-S...FYk7MgodSngAUQ
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Old 08-03-2014, 10:18 AM
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JohnBuckner
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`http://www.flyzoneplanes.com/airplan...010/index.html

When the fellows just have to start with electrics this one is absolutely been the most successful at our field and the one several several of us recommend . There is an economic support system in place with this ship with a considerable number in the club and lots of barter and resell of the Sensai going on all the time.

Now if one wishes to start with glow there really is only one that is acknowledged by many as the most successful RC trainer in the history RC. That of course is the Sig Cadet Senior and is the oldest continually produced trainer.

They are a way of life at our field and we produce events just for them and a number of members do build them for the fellows as well as rebuilds. They actually are responsible for the survival of our club.

John

Last edited by JohnBuckner; 08-03-2014 at 12:05 PM.
Old 08-06-2014, 06:25 AM
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Leo L
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The Firebird Stratos has been discontinued. It was a decent beginner's plane and if you can get one at a good price it would still be a good choice. If you are going to be learning at a club with an instructor, your best bet would be to talk to the instructor about what he recommends. On the other hand, if you will be learning on your own, your best bet is to start with a good foam electric beginner plane. They are relatively inexpensive, are easy to fly and can be easily repaired to get you back in the air as quickly (and cheaply) as possible. Stay away from balsa and nitro until you are well experienced in flying.

Although there are a number of decent beginner planes from various manufacturers, make sure that you do a thorough search before buying. Unfortunately there are many unscrupulous manufacturers that claim their product is suited for beginners when it is not. They make the claim simply to sell more of their planes. The premier brand for beginners is HobbyZone from Horizon Hobby. Go to the Horizon Hobby site: http://www.horizonhobby.com/browse/p...c-outlet-47004 and check out their products. The SuperCub S (with SAFE) is probably the easiest plane to start with. If you have a large flying area available to you, the Apprentice S 15e is another great choice. If you have limited space, the Champ and Delta Ray cannot be beaten. If you like warbirds and are willing to wait until September, get the Corsair S. Although the HobbyZone planes cost more than their competition, they are incredibly well designed and built, can be flown right out of the box without needing a lot of tinkering, have parts available at most local hobby shops, and have the best customer support in the industry.

Last edited by Leo L; 08-06-2014 at 06:28 AM.
Old 08-07-2014, 06:26 AM
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I don't agree with the recommendation to build one's trainer themselves. Yes, it's a good experience and yes, it teaches you a lot about airplane construction. But unless the beginning pilot has an experienced builder to help, the end product probably won't be as good as what you can get in an ARF. It won't be cheaper either, and it won't be nearly as quick.

To offer an answer to the OP, a lot of this depends on your budget. I'm guessing at 30 years old you have enough income to invest a decent sum into the hobby, so let's skip over the low end hobby grade planes like the Stratos, the foam Super Cub, and a number of others. The recommendation to start with a bigger model is good assuming you have a flying space that can accommodate that size of a plane. It will be extremely helpful to join a club and work with an instructor. I'll estimate that your club dues will save you at least double what they cost you in the first year from having someone teach you proper piloting technique, helping with pre-flight inspections and answering questions, and having a smooth runway and a big enough open space to fly in. If you're not planning to join a club and you're not one of those amazingly lucky people that have access to an unused 400 foot long strip of asphalt, then you're back to park flyers. Those planes can be lots of fun too and can get fairly serious, but it's a different class of plane for a different kind of pilot.

So, what's your plan? Are you going to join a club? Do you plan to fly bigger and more serious models in the future? What's your budget?
Old 08-10-2014, 05:47 PM
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Hi bwells14,

Be warned that this hobby is even more fun than you think it will be! I've done a fair bit of instructing with new pilots at my local flying club, and I'd like to steer you toward the Hobbyzone Super Cub:

http://www.hobbyzonerc.com/Products/...ProdId=HBZ8100

This particular plane has flying characteristics more similar to larger RC aircraft. If you learn to fly with the Super Cub RTF, the skills you develop will transfer over to more advanced models. This isn't necessarily true of other inexpensive "park flyer" aircraft like the Hobbyzone Stratos. I've flown the Stratos, and it has unusual controls and doesn't handle like a typical RC aircraft. The Super Cub also can fly in slightly breezy conditions (5 to 10 mph winds) in a much more stable manner than the Stratos.

You know your budget better than I do, of course. Rest assured that you'll have more fun trying to fly the Stratos than you will have not buying any plane at all. Good luck and good shopping!
Old 08-10-2014, 06:52 PM
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Originally Posted by jester_s1 View Post
I don't agree with the recommendation to build one's trainer themselves. Yes, it's a good experience and yes, it teaches you a lot about airplane construction. But unless the beginning pilot has an experienced builder to help, the end product probably won't be as good as what you can get in an ARF. It won't be cheaper either, and it won't be nearly as quick.
Completely agree!

Kurt
Old 08-10-2014, 07:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Bozarth View Post
Completely agree!

Kurt
I sure don't.

Today, and ARF guy had a broken stab on his foamie trainer. He was going to buy a replacement because he didn't know how to make the simple, 10 minute, repair.

If a person has more money than he knows what to do with, by all means go the foam or ARF route. If a new pilot would actully like to know a little bit about the hobby that he is pursuing, building his trainer will provide a basic understanding of the construction of his model.
Old 08-10-2014, 08:50 PM
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What if I told you I own several cars, and that I love to drive them...but I haven't once ever changed the oil in them. It is a 10 minute job...but I still take it to someone else. Poor poor pitifull me.

Kurt
Old 08-11-2014, 04:54 AM
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jester_s1
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Originally Posted by TomCrump View Post
If a person has more money than he knows what to do with, by all means go the foam or ARF route.
Ok, let's look at the reality here.

Arf trainer- Hobbico Superstar $124 from Tower + epoxy to assemble it $8
Trainer kit- Great Planes PT-40 $89 from Tower, plus 2 rolls of covering $35, glue, hinges, and various hardware $40, plus a flat building board and various tools.

Time commitment: ARF- about 6 hours. Kit- about 30 hours. Note that these hours will be spent here at the end of summer while most clubs are still having official training days. After DST ends, most clubs stop having them.

Tom did hit on a weakness in a few new flyers, the fact that they don't think about how planes are made and so they don't think about how to fix things. But the guy in the story who didn't realize you could put a line of gorilla glue on a foam stabilizer sounds like kind of a dummy. I've never built a kit or even an ARF in 9 years of doing the hobby (not for lack of wanting to, but I can buy used airplanes so much cheaper), but I can fix anything. So can anybody else if they are motivated. So the OP can do what he wants. The kit route is fun and definitely will teach you some things about how planes are made, and the ARF route is faster and will get you to the airfield while there are still instructors to work with you. Your choice.
Old 08-11-2014, 06:45 AM
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Once again Tom, it's the case of the "now" generation with their McDonalds/ARF/RTF/gotta have it now upbringing vs our generation that had to learn to build, fly & repair our planes to keep 'em in the air - or any other activity we've ever had. While we'd rather repair a plane that we've had for years (or in my case, decades), they'll just buy a replacement part, or a whole new plane. There's no bond between the members of the "now" generation and anything else, the modern "until I'm tired of you" attitude in which they live together is proof of that.

Now, if bwells14 - or anyone else - is serious about getting into the sport they'll do it the right way. Otherwise, they'll probably go the route of the "genius" who put a drone into one of Yellowstone's hot pools this past weekend - thus endangering the entire sport for us, who truly do care.

Then, they'll go on to the next thing.

It's an argument that will go on until the last of us goes, then the retail stores and over-regulating government will have the last say.
Old 08-11-2014, 07:14 AM
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I think it comes down to more than the budget. It has to do with mechanical skills as well. If it was me, I'd pick up a Kadet MkII kit and build it from the ground up. Along the way, I'd be either taking it out to the field or having an experienced builder come to the house to check everything over to make sure it was done correctly. Then again, I'm presently building a modified Kadet Jr from plans so we'll see how that goes when it's all said and done
Old 08-11-2014, 11:33 AM
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I'm thinking about getting me a mini-bipe as my first rc plane. It doesn't come with a motor. What is a good brushless motor/esc combo?
Old 08-11-2014, 11:35 AM
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minibipe recommends a 10A motor esc so I guess my question is what is a good brand to look for and what to avoid?
Old 08-11-2014, 12:58 PM
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I too would go with one of the .40 size trainers.. I started on the Sig Kadet MKII, great flying plane, and when U are ready, you can do some aerobatics with it. (I could Knife edge mine!) however, the Kadet MKII is a bit more involved in its construction, but is not all that difficult for a beginner to manage! I would probably steer you towards the Kadet LT 40 kit, similar flight characteristics, without being so involved in the construction as the MKII is..

if you want to go with an arf, the Sig Kadet LT.40 arf, Tower Trainer .40 or the Hangar 9 Alpha .40 are all good choices.

Craig.
Old 08-11-2014, 02:23 PM
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I think a parkzone t 28 is a good choice easy to fly ,looks good has no bad tendencies . It's cheap... But no matter what you get it is smart to start with someone who can buddy box you so you don't lose your plane on first flight. Or if you are doing it on your own start with a simulator that red reset button cost you nothing
Old 08-11-2014, 02:44 PM
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Don't forget the Avistar. Works well with electricity OR glow, and assembles in an afternoon.

Also:

You can either build your own or buy an ARF plane. The Avistar is an ARF, and a very worthy airframe. My *personal recommendation* is to start with the ARF or foamy and learn to fly first, then build a kit (Sig Somethin' Extra is a great 1st kit). That way, you're not so emotionally invested in the airframe, and will be more able to concentrate on all phases of lactually earning. Takes some of the fear out of the process.

Where are you located? I'd be happy to be your instructor if you're local

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Old 08-11-2014, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by nighthawk28 View Post
I think a parkzone t 28 is a good choice easy to fly ,looks good has no bad tendencies . It's cheap... But no matter what you get it is smart to start with someone who can buddy box you so you don't lose your plane on first flight. Or if you are doing it on your own start with a simulator that red reset button cost you nothing
the buddy box is very good advice. The simulator will teach you something, but there's no substitute for real-world...
Old 08-11-2014, 02:51 PM
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Apprentice S 15e never had a plane got this 2 weeks ago and a sim and I can fly gret starter
Old 08-11-2014, 07:24 PM
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I recommend the apprentice also. That is what our club uses to teach people. Building a plane so you know how to fix it after you wreck it is old school, and wastes time and money. I know, that's how I learned. The apprentice has a stabilization system and can self level. With those functions turned off the plane is very capable in aerobatics so you can grow into it. Good luck.
Old 08-11-2014, 07:39 PM
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My nephew moved back to this area and decided he wanted to fly. He looked on various hobby sites and eBay and wanted a p51 right off. I explained to him that the first thing he needed to do was borrow my real flight simulator and learn the controls on the radio and what they did and practice at least 15 to 30 minutes each night on certain planes. I showed him the basics of what to try and what not to try but stressed the he needed to practice straight level flight and straight level turns. I always have a world models Mach 1 high wing plane in my hangar and fly it often. It's a good steady plane to fly and a good plane to shake off cobwebs after not flying for a while. I have the low rates set pretty close to manufacture's recommendations and have the high rates set just about as high as you can set them. I also have a evolution 52 swinging a 11x7 prop in it. It is a great trainer plane on low rates and it is a ball to fly on high rates at wide open throttle. It a good looking plane with white on top and bright reddish pink on the bottom so you can always tell where it is at in the air. After 3 weeks on the flight sim, and approx 2 hours of actual flying on a trainer cord 4 different times, he soloed the plane and did quite well. I think if you want to learn to fly, get you an Arf, either borrow a flight sim or buy one, get someone to trainer cord up with you and go fly. It is a very addicting hobby, and if you love it and actually want to build one then look at all the kits available and build your I personal plane. My son learned to fly then built a balsa USA Moonraker from a kit. He has never flown it and says he never will as it's not exactly square and a little difference in elevator height from side to side, but it looks pretty good as far as the covering, but he thinks it's wRped so bad that if he tries to fly it, it will crash. He has built other kits and done quite well and like me just loves to fly whether it's an Arf or a box of sticks turned into an airplane. I gave my nephew my Mach 1 after he made his solo flight with it and I bought me another. He still has it and loves to fly it and I fly right along side.there are lots of good planes to learn to fly and some not so good. Get you one you like. Learn to fly it with confidence, then start looking for something a little more sportier to fly, but most of all have fun flying !!!!
Old 08-11-2014, 08:15 PM
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jester_s1
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skylark-flier
- You're talking about two extremes in the hobby. On the one side you have the ones you're calling the "good" hobbyists who like to build and are willing to delay gratification in order to have better workmanship and pride in what they have. I admire those guys too, and many are the backbones of their clubs. The other extreme is the "here today gone tomorrow" type who wants it all instant, including the flying skills. They aren't committed and treat the planes as toys instead of a serious hobby. I agree with you that those two extremes exist, but I disagree and frankly take offense to your implication that everyone who isn't in the first group has to be in the second. I also take offense at every older RC pilot who characterizes those younger than them as lazy, flippant, and unreliable when you see ARF planes or foamies. And I'm quite certain that not all younger pilots are dangerous and inconsiderate and on the verge of getting us regulated with a drone.

The truth is that there is a big middle ground between those two extremes. As I said above, I've never built a kit in 9 years of doing RC, nor have I even assembled an ARF. I buy used planes that I want, frequently doing minor repairs to get them airworthy, and I save a lot of money. Yet I've stuck with it for 9 years, I compete in SPA and plan to start IMAC next year, I've volunteered as a trainer, I'm a co planner for my clubs National Model Aviation Day event, I am as safe and considerate as I possibly can be at the field, and I do all of my own repairs even for bad crashes that I think are worth it. So I'll present myself as a 38 year old youngster who, according to you, should be a nuisance at the field, yet I have all of the positive attributes of the 60 year old pilots except for the ability to do a flawless silk and dope finish. It is possible for a pilot to make things easy on himself on the building side of things and still be an excellent pilot at the field and an excellent club member and representative of the hobby too. That is, of course, unless some old buzzard makes too many disparaging comments about his equipment and he quits in favor of a hobby that is more newbie friendly.

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