Go Back  RCU Forums > RC Airplanes > Kit Building
Reload this Page >

Chipmunk Brotherhood.

Notices
Kit Building If you're building a kit and have questions or want to discuss kit building post it here.

Chipmunk Brotherhood.

Old 06-14-2014, 03:31 PM
  #1  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default ~~~ Chipmunk Brotherhood. ~~~

So I am a big fan of the DHC 1 Chipmunk and the Super Chipmunk. One of my first kit builds was a CG Super Chipmunk with a Saito 100 and Robart struts. I loved that plane. I have had four chippys and two at one time. So with all the "brotherhoods around, and if there isn't already a Chippy Brotherhood, why not start one.

Anyone interested?


I am currently building a 1/5th scale DHC 1 http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/kit-...l#post11823056






TB
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	robart 2.jpg
Views:	3623
Size:	773.3 KB
ID:	2005015   Click image for larger version

Name:	image 2.jpg
Views:	2646
Size:	22.9 KB
ID:	2005016   Click image for larger version

Name:	image 1.jpg
Views:	3353
Size:	279.9 KB
ID:	2005017   Click image for larger version

Name:	chippies.jpg
Views:	2927
Size:	357.2 KB
ID:	2005018  

Last edited by TonyBuilder; 06-14-2014 at 06:53 PM.
Old 06-15-2014, 07:40 AM
  #2  
DavidAgar
My Feedback: (108)
 
DavidAgar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Battle Ground, WA
Posts: 5,053
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default



Sign me up. Her are 2 of the many in my garage. Thanks Dave
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	chipmunk3.jpg
Views:	2766
Size:	43.8 KB
ID:	2005107   Click image for larger version

Name:	P1010198.JPG
Views:	2829
Size:	68.7 KB
ID:	2005108  
Old 06-15-2014, 09:30 AM
  #3  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Hi Dave, Glade you are interested. I see these brotherhood threads as a resource for those that enjoy the specific airplane that is being modeled. Members can post there build ideas, there planes, share technique and just have fun. Nice planes Dave.

Your #2

#1. Tonybuilder
#2. DavidAgar
Old 06-17-2014, 04:20 PM
  #4  
ThunderBoat42
My Feedback: (1)
 
ThunderBoat42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Alabaster, AL
Posts: 708
Received 5 Likes on 3 Posts
Default

Hey Tony I'm in if worthy. Goldberg chipmunk.

I have some photos of the Pepsi chipmunk I took at Sun N Fun about 15+ years ago. Will need to scan them though.
Old 06-17-2014, 05:26 PM
  #5  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

All are worthy


Yes post your pics.


Your #3

#1. Tonybuilder
#2. DavidAgar
#3. ThunderBoat42



TB
Old 06-17-2014, 05:50 PM
  #6  
ThunderBoat42
My Feedback: (1)
 
ThunderBoat42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Alabaster, AL
Posts: 708
Received 5 Likes on 3 Posts
Default

You da man. Thank you. I didn't realize there were others who loved the old Super Chipmunk. I fell in love with it when I saw the original do the first lomclovac (have no idea how to spell it) back in the 80's. I studied the video one frame at a time until I could copy it with my Rc version. It was a few months before Art Scholl was killed filming Top Gun.

BTW. Which P47 do you have. Considering a 60-90 size TF or H9.

Last edited by ThunderBoat42; 06-17-2014 at 05:53 PM.
Old 06-18-2014, 01:26 PM
  #7  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Hoping this may be useful

Hello all Chipmunk lovers.

I have a fair amount of information on the full size Chipmunk from the time I was flying them.

I may be able to help with information to any builder of a model.

Advise if this post is out of topic and I will delete its content.

Zor
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	R 100_7124.jpg
Views:	182
Size:	44.6 KB
ID:	2006598   Click image for larger version

Name:	R 100_7125.jpg
Views:	196
Size:	32.6 KB
ID:	2006599   Click image for larger version

Name:	R 100_7126.jpg
Views:	246
Size:	41.9 KB
ID:	2006600  

Last edited by Zor; 06-18-2014 at 01:28 PM. Reason: Correcting typo
Old 06-18-2014, 05:23 PM
  #8  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Zor, of course your post is on topic and all information about chipmunks are welcome. Brotherhoods are about sharing.


TB
Old 06-18-2014, 06:33 PM
  #9  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Thanks T B

Zor
Old 06-18-2014, 07:14 PM
  #10  
ThunderBoat42
My Feedback: (1)
 
ThunderBoat42's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Alabaster, AL
Posts: 708
Received 5 Likes on 3 Posts
Default

I've got some photos on my phone but the site is being difficult to the iPhone.

Awesome me stuff there Zor.
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	273
Size:	35.4 KB
ID:	2006699   Click image for larger version

Name:	image.jpg
Views:	2820
Size:	110.1 KB
ID:	2006700  

Last edited by ThunderBoat42; 06-18-2014 at 07:17 PM.
Old 06-19-2014, 02:22 AM
  #11  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

My current chipmunk build is a DHC trainer. I have built three super chipmunks and just recently fell in love with the military trainer version.






TB
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	192044_big.jpg
Views:	3219
Size:	549.1 KB
ID:	2006754   Click image for larger version

Name:	121191_big 2.jpg
Views:	3208
Size:	362.7 KB
ID:	2006755  
Old 06-19-2014, 03:09 AM
  #12  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Beautiful pictures

Thanks TonyBuilder for the pictures.

The original trainer has such sleek smooth aerodynamic lines that give it high flight efficiency.

It would (should) also be seen (experienced) in the construction of a scale model.

The flying club had three Chipmunk supplied by the government for the training of air cadets at the time that some air cadet could qualify for a private pilot license. They had 30 days to complete the 35 hours of air time for the license.

In those days it was not like now as the clubs were real clubs and not a business enterprise trying to get as much flying time and revenue as they can.

I wish I could join the brotherhood but I cannot qualify. I will remain following closely this thread that reminds me of such good times a long time ago.

Wishing you all the best with the brotherhood.

Zor
Old 06-19-2014, 07:37 AM
  #13  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Once a chippy flyer always a chippy flyer!



TB
Old 06-20-2014, 02:15 AM
  #14  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Originally Posted by ThunderBoat42

BTW. Which P47 do you have. Considering a 60-90 size TF or H9.


TFGS P-47

http://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/kit-...-build-60.html


TB
Old 06-20-2014, 02:17 AM
  #15  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

This is a really cool pic!






TB
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	2167692.jpg
Views:	2879
Size:	366.9 KB
ID:	2007003  
Old 06-20-2014, 07:28 AM
  #16  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Super photography

Originally Posted by TonyBuilder
This is a really cool pic!






TB
We can even see the rivets in good focus.
No doubt a high quality telephoto lens on the camera.

Tks for the picture.

Zor
Old 06-23-2014, 02:43 AM
  #17  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

Initially formed as a subsidiary of the de Havilland Aircraft Company on March 5, 1928, de Havilland Canada produced many of its parent company's aircraft before producing their first indigenous aircraft, the DHC-1 Chipmunk. Designed by Wsiewolod Jan Jakimiuk, the former chief designer of the Polish aircraft manufacturer PZL "Warszawa-Okecie" S.A, it was developed as a replacement for the venerable de Havilland DH82A Tiger Moth. The prototype (CF-DIO-X) flew for the first time at Downsview, Toronto on May 22, 1946 and despite the crash of the second prototype on January 19, 1947 after failing to recover from a spin, deliveries of production aircraft to the Royal Canadian Air Force commenced in 1948. According to some sources, the aircraft was originally nicknamed the "Jakimiuk" after its designer but was renamed the Chipmunk when Phillip Garratt (the manager of de Havilland Canada) returned from a vacation during which he had been "entertained" by the antics of several chipmunks. Even though the name Jakimiuk was popular, Chipmunk had a certain similarity so the name was adopted. This led to the decision to name all subsequent de Havilland Canada aircraft after Canadian animals, whether this is fact or an urban legend is unclear.

The design of the Chipmunk took advantage of several wartime advances in aviation construction, resulting in an aircraft that differed from many previous de Havilland offerings. The most noticeable was the change from the trusted wood and steel tube to all metal construction. Fabric covering was still used on areas such as the wings aft of the main wing spar, the trailing edge flaps and the control surfaces; however, the wing leading edge and fuselage were of stressed-skin, metal construction. The instructor and student were seated in a tandem cockpit that was covered by a rearward sliding, one-piece Plexiglas canopy. Considering the bitter winters that could be encountered in Canada, this was a welcome change from older open-cockpit designs. Two areas of the Chipmunk's design that remained true to traditional de Havilland ways were the shape of the vertical stabiliser and rudder and the use of a 142 hp de Havilland Gipsy Major 1C engine driving a fixed pitch, two-blade propeller. Although the choice of an engine of somewhat modest horsepower could be seen by some as "typically British" when compared to the powerplants in use in some contemporary American aircraft, the Chipmunk's MAUW (Maximum All Up Weight) of around 1,800 lbs gave it an excellent power to weight ratio.


The first production Chipmunks were given the designation DHC-1 and entered service with the RCAF as the Chipmunk T.1. A change to the 145 hp Gipsy Major 10 engine resulted in the DHC-1A-1 and then the fully aerobatic, Gipsy Major 1C powered DHC-1B-1 (the previous models being only partially aerobatic). Further minor improvements, design and engine changes and variants produced for export led to a host of suffixes, ending with the 142 hp Gipsy Major 1G powered DHC-1B-2-S5. The Royal Air Force also expressed an interest in the Chipmunk and, following evaluation of two aircraft by the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment at Boscombe Down in England, it was ordered into production for the RAF under Air Ministry Specification 8/48 as a fully aerobatic, ab initio trainer. The de Havilland parent company began building Chipmunks as the T.10 for the RAF and subsequently, some of these aircraft were passed to the Army and later to the Royal Navy. Although at first glance it was visually similar to the Canadian aircraft, apart from a multi-panel cockpit canopy instead of a one-piece version, there were many subtle differences. These included (to name a few) being built to imperial measurements as opposed to metric, the installation of a 145 hp Gipsy Major 8 engine, faired landing gear legs, different wingtips and cockpit layout, a slightly thinner aluminium skin and changes to the attachments for the wings and tailplane and elevator profile.


Deliveries of the T.10 began in February 1950 with the Oxford University Air Squadron being the first to receive the type. This was soon followed by deliveries to 19 RAF Reserve flying schools and two Rhodesian Air Training Group schools. Eventually, the aircraft went on to replace the DH82A Tiger Moth with all 17 university air squadrons in England as well as the RAF Volunteer Reserve flying schools and, from time to time, the RAF College at Cramwell.
As with several previous de Havilland aircraft, the Chipmunk was to have royal connections in Britain. A brand new T.10 was delivered to RAF White Waltham and used to teach HRH Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, to fly. Trained by Flight Lieutenant Caryl Gordon, the Duke made his first solo on December 20, 1952. Sixteen years later, HRH Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales, was also being taught to fly in a Chipmunk. On July 30, 1968, the Prince began his initial flights in a T.10 at RAF Tangmere before more formal training began on October 28 of the same year. After fourteen and a half hours of instruction by Squadron Leader Philip Pinney, he made his first solo flight at RAF Bassingbourn on January 14, 1969.


Even though the DHC-1 was originally designed and built in Canada, only 217 of the eventual 1,291 Chipmunks produced came from that country. The vast majority were produced in England with 1,000 rolling off the de Havilland production lines before production ended in 1958. Out of this total, 735 went mainly to the RAF as the T.10 and the T.20 export version with civilian models being built as the Mk.21. As well as the Canadian and British aircraft, a further 60 Chipmunks were produced under licence in Portugal by Indústria Aeronáutica de Portugal, SA (OGMA). By the late 1950s many ex-RAF T.10s were being released into the civil market as the Chipmunk Mk.22 while a number of those that remained in service had larger fuel tanks installed and were re-designated the Chipmunk Mk.22A. Further after-market conversions included the heavily modified Mk.23 crop sprayer with a hopper in place of the front cockpit developed in England by Farm Aviation Services. Another agricultural version was also produced as a joint venture by Sasin Aircraft Services and Aerostructures in Australia as the SA29 Spraymaster. Although similar in concept to the Mk.23, the SA29 was very different structurally, had a one-piece canopy with a cable cutter, streamlined strakes and a dorsal fin fillet. It also had wing endplates and different spray bars. The same company also produced the Sundowner, a modified Chipmunk with a 180 hp Lycoming O-360 engine.
With their excellent handling characteristics, it came as no surprise that a number of surplus Chipmunks were converted for use in aerobatic competitions and displays. The Super Chipmunk was one such conversion that went on to win the American national aerobatics championships in 1969. Work on this aircraft began in 1967 when Jean Paul Huneault of Pierrefonds, Quebec started modifying an ex-RCAF DHC-1B-2-S3. The original Gipsy Major engine was replaced by a 210 hp Continental IO-360-C6A driving a Hartzell constant-speed propeller and the control surfaces were re-skinned in metal. The airframe remained basically original although new engine mounts and a revised cowling were fitted as well as shortened landing gear and electrically driven flaps. An updated Super Chipmunk powered by an aerobatic version of the 210 hp Teledyne Continental IO-360-HB (as used in the CT/4B Airtrainer) is still available in kit form today.
Another far more modified version was the late Art Scholl's DHC-1A "Pennzoil Special" that performed at air shows throughout America in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although it also started life as a surplus RCAF Chipmunk, by the time it had been rebuilt it was a totally different aircraft. A much more powerful 260 hp six cylinder Lycoming GO-435 engine was installed, the tandem cockpit was changed to a single seat one, retractable landing gear was fitted, the wingspan was reduced by 3 ft, 4 in and the area of the vertical stabiliser and rudder was increased by a quarter. In addition, the wingtips, tailplane and rudder lost their distinctive de Havilland curves and acquired a more "squared off" look. This aircraft still exists and is on display at the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in the United States.


Not only did the Chipmunk prove to be very popular worldwide (allegedly seeing service in over 60 countries) but it also had amazing longevity. In Canada, the aircraft was finally retired from service in 1971 while those in the RAF were gradually replaced by the BAe (Scottish Aviation Bulldog) T1 but still continued training pilots until 1997. As well as being used as a trainer, some countries employed the Chipmunk in roles as diverse as glider towing, artillery observation posts and even on military security patrols. As mentioned previously, the aircraft had excellent handling characteristics which, when combined with its beautifully harmonised controls, has led to the Chipmunk being described as "just like a Spitfire to fly but with a lot less power". The current use of a T.10 to train Spitfire pilots for the RAF's Battle of Britain Memorial Flight is perhaps a testimony to this. Of the estimated 500 Chipmunks still in existence, the vast majority are still airworthy and in private ownership, including here in New Zealand. Even though the Royal New Zealand Air Force never used any variants of the DHC-1, it has proved popular with private owners and a number have been imported into the country since the 1990s.
Old 06-23-2014, 08:50 AM
  #18  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Very interesting reading

The history of the Chipmunk is fascinating reading.

A very successful design and many Chipmunks still in service.

Attached a couple of pictures of the prototype CF-DIO as appear in one of my manuals.

Hope the photos show well.

Thanks for that history.

Zor
Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version

Name:	R 100_7134.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	31.2 KB
ID:	2008053   Click image for larger version

Name:	R 100_7135.jpg
Views:	211
Size:	35.8 KB
ID:	2008054  

Last edited by Zor; 06-23-2014 at 08:54 AM.
Old 06-26-2014, 07:27 PM
  #19  
rye
My Feedback: (10)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: chicago, IL
Posts: 1,841
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default

hi
i am building my third C-G chipmunk kit and made copys of all the parts for more ,i really love this bird flys great ,we loss the two last year in a mid air we had these two for 10 years ,i was lucky to win the bid on ebay for one new in the boxs ,now i see that the main spars go about 2-3 " past the plans would it be better if i make the wing 2-3 inches longer will it help it or should i just cut them at the plans egde as i did before it would make the wing 68" long from 64",thanks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S75IF4LUMoE
Old 06-27-2014, 01:47 AM
  #20  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

I would build as per the plans, but you can surely modify it if you like.


TB
Old 06-28-2014, 05:54 AM
  #21  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Super Chipmunk or military trainer

Originally Posted by rye

hi

i am building my third C-G chipmunk kit and made copys of all the parts for more ,i really love this bird flys great ,we loss the two last year in a mid air we had these two for 10 years ,i was lucky to win the bid on ebay for one new in the boxs ,now i see that the main spars go about 2-3 " past the plans would it be better if i make the wing 2-3 inches longer will it help it or should i just cut them at the plans egde as i did before it would make the wing 68" long from 64",thanks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S75IF4LUMoE
Hi rye,

I assume you are building the Super Chipmunk which is highly modified from the original military trainer.
On that basis, as implied by TB any modifications does not make much difference.

You may look at post #7 where you find the dimensions of the full size original Chipmunk if you are concerned with scale dimensioning.

Zor
Old 07-04-2014, 11:49 AM
  #22  
DavidAgar
My Feedback: (108)
 
DavidAgar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Battle Ground, WA
Posts: 5,053
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

Build it as per plans. It is hard to match the perfection that the kit is once you fly the finished airplane. The CG Chipmunk is one of the best. Good Luck, Dave
Old 07-05-2014, 03:55 AM
  #23  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

The Chippie was a favorite of the RAF


It is said that the de Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk looks the way an airplane should look. Designed as a military trainer, the "Chippie" has a tapered wing and a narrow, sleek fuselage that give it the appearance of a petite World War II fighter. It also has that distinctively shaped vertical fin, the signature of many de Havilland designs (including the D.H.98 Mosquito fighter/bomber).


After World War II, de Havilland Aircraft of Canada wanted to develop an airplane for use in the Canadian bush. The parent company in England preferred instead that its Canadian counterpart first develop a replacement for the Tiger Moth, an open-cockpit biplane that had been the mainstay of the Royal Air Force (RAF) and Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF). The Moth had become too antiquated to continue as a basic trainer. (The parent company was preoccupied with the development of the Comet, the world's first jetliner.)


The prototype of the Chipmunk first flew in Canada on May 22, 1946. Production aircraft were subsequently built there and in England (with some also built in Portugal). There is no significant difference between the Canadian and British models except that the last of the Canadian aircraft have bubble canopies while all others have greenhouse canopies like those on the North American T-6 Texan.


The Chipmunk is all metal except for the control surfaces and the rear two-thirds of the wings, which are fabric covered.


The DHC-1 designation indicates that the Chipmunk was the first original design of the Canadian firm, which eventually was allowed to develop its bush plane, the DHC-2 Beaver. De Havilland built 1,283 Chipmunks from 1946 through 1961, a 16-year production run, and the Chippie served the RAF longer than any other trainer. But time and technology caught up with the Chipmunk in 1971. The RAF began to replace its beloved trainer with British Aerospace Bulldogs, offspring of the Beagle Pup.


Currently there are 350 airworthy Chipmunks in civilian hands, of which 100 are in the United States and 138 are in the United Kingdom. The remaining aircraft are scattered worldwide.

The Chippie is powered by a 145-horsepower version of the 1930s-vintage, four-cylinder, inverted in-line Gipsy Major used in the trainer it was designed to replace, the de Havilland Tiger Moth. Manufactured by de Havilland, Bristol-Siddeley, and Rolls-Royce, these engines have a TBO of 1,500 hours even though the military ran them to 2,250 hours without difficulty.


The Gipsy Major also is called the "Dripsy Major" because if it isn't dripping oil, something is terribly wrong. It typically burns 1.5 quarts per hour (most is blown out), and 2.5 quarts per hour is the maximum allowable. "The fuller the oil tank, the more oil gets blown out," says Hill. He operates with only a half-full oil tank for local flights.


The Chipmunk has a 30,000-hour airframe, and Hill's airplane has only 11,800 hours, but this has been raised to an effective 21,000 hours because of its aerobatic history.


The airplane does not have a baggage compartment per se, but a cubbyhole behind the rear seat accommodates 40 pounds of personal items.


The brass, screw-in fuel cap for each of the two wing tanks looks more like something you would expect to find on a boat. A fuel gauge adjacent to each fuel cap can be read from the cockpit. Unfortunately, it is not illuminated, which restricts the Chipmunk from flying at night (but only in the U.K.). Each gauge has two scales, one for indicating fuel quantity on the ground with the tail down and the other for indicating fuel remaining in level flight.


The Chipmunk does not have a primer in the cockpit like most airplanes do. This requires the pilot to undertake a quaint priming ritual before engine start. It involves either opening the left side of the cowling or accessing the priming controls through small circular ports cut out of the cowling. The index finger of the right hand is used to pull a ring that opens the carburetor, and the left index finger moves a lever up and down to manually pump fuel into the carburetor until fuel drips onto the ground from the overflow vent at the bottom of the engine. This done, the propeller is pulled through four compression strokes to suck fuel into each of the four cylinders.


Although there is no electric fuel pump, there are two engine-driven fuel pumps.


Hill and I are large pilots, but we are comfortable in the narrow cockpit, which has the fit and feel of a fighter. Both pilots are surrounded by controls and switches that fall easily to hand. You have no doubt that this is a military machine.


Although the seats are not adjustable, the rudder pedals are, moving fore and aft to accommodate long- and short-legged pilots. Solo flight is allowed only from the forward cockpit.


A sliding knob on the floor near the base of the control stick is the "fuel cock." It moves fore and aft to open and close the valve, supplying fuel from both wing tanks to the engine. Ahead of that (also on the floor) is the horizontally mounted, British-style compass that is so large that it looks as though it belongs on the bridge of an ocean liner.


Another interesting instrument is the bat and ball, the British term for a turn-and-bank indicator. A spring-loaded push button on the left electrical panel is used to tap out Morse code via the yellow light on the Chippie's belly to communicate with others in your formation.


There are two magneto switches in each cockpit, and all four must be flipped up to start the engine. Only the front cockpit has a starter button.


Throttle cracked and mixture rich (meaning that the mixture control is fully aft, another British tradition), and you're ready to start.


Chipmunks in military service literally started with a bang and the smell of cordite from an exploding 12-bore shotgun shell (minus the lead shot), a part of the Coffman cartridge-type starter that uses rapidly expanding gases to turn the crankshaft. Most civilian aircraft have been converted with electric starters.


Hill's Chippie starts after only two blades. Power should not be applied for taxi, however, until the oil temperature reaches 40 degrees Celsius.


The tailwheel is fully castoring and non-steerable, which means that differential braking is used to maneuver on the ground. But it is unlikely that you have ever used a brake system like the one in a Chipmunk.


You pull aft on a parking-brake lever (similar to the parking-brake handle on some cars) on the left side of the cockpit to engage a ratchet at the point where the disk brakes barely rub against the wheels. The ratchet then holds this slight amount of braking without your having to pull on the brake handle. After that, moving the rudder bar (pedals) determines the wheel to which the braking applies. In other words, move the right rudder pedal and brake pressure is applied only to the right wheel, and so forth. When taxiing with a crosswind, add another notch of brake and apply downwind rudder to keep the Chippie tracking straight. A new Chipmunk pilot tends to overcontrol, but with a little practice, he discovers that the system is effective and can be operated without having to think about it.


On the right, a lever similar to the brake handle is used to operate the flaps. Lift it to the first notch for 15 degrees and to the second and final notch for 30 degrees.


Some S-turning is needed to see over the Spitfirelike nose.


The runup is conventional, and there is a perceptible sense of excitement as you line up on the runway.


The rudder becomes effective almost as soon as the throttle reaches its forward limit, and the tail comes up shortly thereafter. Pilots new to a taildragger without a steerable tailwheel quickly learn that the airplane must be "flown" with the flight controls from the beginning of the takeoff roll until the aircraft comes to rest at the end of a flight.


The Chipmunk lifts off at 45 knots, and your instinct will be to press the right rudder pedal as the nose pitches skyward. Do not do that in this airplane. The nose of a Chipmunk yaws right, not left, because British engines turn the "wrong way" (counterclockwise when viewed from behind) and require left rudder to keep the airplane on an even keel during full-power climbs.


Surprisingly, the engine is canted 4 degrees right, which exacerbates the right-turning tendency. This was done in an effort to better prepare pilots for transition into high-horsepower fighters.


The tachometer has two hands, one to indicate thousands of rpm and the other hundreds. It is similar in appearance to the adjacent altimeter, which can be confusing. Retard the throttle as you level off after a climb and you get a visual sensation that the airplane is losing altitude.


Maneuvering is the Chipmunk's strong suit. The controls are so exceptionally well balanced, light, responsive, and harmonized that the airplane could easily be the benchmark against which other lightplanes are measured. The DHC-1 is an absolute delight to fly, and you quickly feel as though you are at one with it. Some pilots, however, find the rudder to be too sensitive and learn to press a pedal instead of shoving a foot into it. The airplane does not tolerate a ham-fisted pilot. My friend Brian Souter says about de Havilland trainers, "They are easy to fly but difficult to fly well."


Aerobatics are allowed, but the engine will quickly burp and belch during negative-G maneuvers because it does not have an inverted fuel system. The Chippie is designed for plus-9 to minus-6 Gs.


There is no stall-warning indicator, but the strong prestall buffet serves the purpose. Although stalls can be sharp with power on and flaps extended, they are otherwise mild-mannered. (Wing camber increases from root to tip, and this helps to prevent the wing from dropping during a stall.)


4 Chippie does not tolerate being taken for granted, though, and drops a wing in protest to those who don't keep the slip-skid ball in its cage. Using ailerons to pick up a stalled wing can aggravate the roll. As a matter of fact, it is recommended that a pilot use opposite aileron to assist in spin entry. Chipmunk pilots claim that it is as easy to avoid an inadvertent spin as it can be difficult to recover from one. A placard in the aircraft says, "Spin recovery [from a fully developed spin] may need full forward stick [emphasis mine] until rotation stops."


The Chipmunk's only serious shortcomings are endurance and range. With a total of only 22 gallons of avgas in the tanks, you are effectively limited to two hours and 200 nautical air miles (plus a 45-minute reserve). Retard the throttle for descent and a pawl mechanically pulls back the adjacent mixture control into the rich position. This makes it impossible to make an approach and landing with a lean mixture.


The carburetor heater does not really heat the induction air. Instead, the carburetor uses ambient warm air from inside the cowling. The RAF wired this to the open position. Although this diminishes performance slightly, it helps to prevent students from learning about carburetor ice the hard way.


The canopy may be slid back to the first notch (a few inches) at any airspeed, but open it to the second notch (a few more inches) and the maximum-allowable airspeed is 90 knots. During approaches on warm summer days, however, many pilots open the canopy all the way for a dose of delirious joy.


The Chipmunk glides best at 60 knots and is slowed to 55 over the threshold. Most pilots land with 15 degrees of flaps, but using 30 improves over-the-nose visibility. Slips are a joy because there is hardly any airframe buffeting and control forces are so light.


The Gipsy Major should be idled for a few minutes before shutdown to allow engine temperatures to stabilize. Then shut off the magnetos and advance the throttle fully forward to prevent backfiring and "dieseling."


As the propeller ticks to a stop, a new Chipmunk pilot usually just sits in the cockpit for a while wearing a smile that reveals his infatuation. The Chippie engenders that kind of affection from those lucky enough to fly one.


SPEC SHEET


De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk
Price as tested: $55,000
Specifications
Powerplant Rolls-Royce Gipsy Major 8 or 10-2, 4-cyl, inverted in-line, 145 hp @ 2,550 rpm
Recommended TBO 1,500 hr
Propeller Fairey Reed two-blade, fixed-pitch, 81-in dia
Length 25 ft 5 in
Height 7 ft
Wingspan 34 ft 4 in
Wing area 172.5 sq ft
Wing loading 12.8 lb/sq ft
Power loading 15.2 lb/hp
Seats 2
Empty weight (as tested) 1,517 lb
Max gross weight 2,200 lb
Max gross weight (aerobatics) 2,100 lb
Max useful load 683 lb
Payload w/full fuel 550 lb
Fuel capacity, std 22 gal
Oil capacity 8 qt
Baggage capacity 40 lb
Performance
Takeoff distance over 50-ft obstacle 1,350 ft
Max demonstrated crosswind component 10 kt
Rate of climb, sea level 800 fpm
Max level speed, sea level 120 KIAS
Cruise speed/range w/45-min rsv, std fuel (fuel consumption)
@ 75% power, 5,000 ft 95 kt/207 nm (7.5 gph)
Service ceiling 15,800 feet
Glide ratio 10.5:1
Landing distance over 50-ft obstacle 1,425 ft
Limiting and Recommended Airspeeds
Takeoff safety speed 56 KIAS
V X (best angle of climb) 56 KIAS
V Y (best rate of climb) 65 KIAS
V A (design maneuvering) 117 KIAS
V FE (max flap extended) 71 KIAS
V NO (max structural cruising) 155 KIAS
V NE (never exceed) 155 KIAS
Best-glide speed 60 KIAS
Final approach speed 60 KIAS
Max canopy-open speed 90 KIAS
V S1 (stall, clean) 47 KIAS
V S0 (stall, landing configuration) 43 KIAS


TB

Last edited by TonyBuilder; 07-05-2014 at 04:00 AM.
Old 07-05-2014, 08:55 AM
  #24  
Zor
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Ontario, ON, CANADA
Posts: 3,524
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default Some variations over the years

Originally Posted by TonyBuilder
The Chippie was a favorite of the RAF


It is said that the de Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk looks the way an airplane should look. Designed as a military trainer, the "Chippie" has a tapered wing and a narrow, sleek fuselage that give it the appearance of a petite World War II fighter. It also has that distinctively shaped vertical fin, the signature of many de Havilland designs (including the D.H.98 Mosquito fighter/bomber).

>
>
>
>


As the propeller ticks to a stop, a new Chipmunk pilot usually just sits in the cockpit for a while wearing a smile that reveals his infatuation. The Chippie engenders that kind of affection from those lucky enough to fly one.


SPEC SHEET


De Havilland DHC-1 Chipmunk
Price as tested: $55,000
Specifications
Powerplant Rolls-Royce Gipsy Major 8 or 10-2, 4-cyl, inverted in-line, 145 hp @ 2,550 rpm
Recommended TBO 1,500 hr
Propeller Fairey Reed two-blade, fixed-pitch, 81-in dia
Length 25 ft 5 in
Height 7 ft
Wingspan 34 ft 4 in
Wing area 172.5 sq ft
Wing loading 12.8 lb/sq ft
Power loading 15.2 lb/hp
Seats 2
Empty weight (as tested) 1,517 lb
Max gross weight 2,200 lb
Max gross weight (aerobatics) 2,100 lb
Max useful load 683 lb
Payload w/full fuel 550 lb
Fuel capacity, std 22 gal
Oil capacity 8 qt
Baggage capacity 40 lb
Performance
Takeoff distance over 50-ft obstacle 1,350 ft
Max demonstrated crosswind component 10 kt
Rate of climb, sea level 800 fpm
Max level speed, sea level 120 KIAS
Cruise speed/range w/45-min rsv, std fuel (fuel consumption)
@ 75% power, 5,000 ft 95 kt/207 nm (7.5 gph)
Service ceiling 15,800 feet
Glide ratio 10.5:1
Landing distance over 50-ft obstacle 1,425 ft
Limiting and Recommended Airspeeds
Takeoff safety speed 56 KIAS
V X (best angle of climb) 56 KIAS
V Y (best rate of climb) 65 KIAS
V A (design maneuvering) 117 KIAS
V FE (max flap extended) 71 KIAS
V NO (max structural cruising) 155 KIAS
V NE (never exceed) 155 KIAS
Best-glide speed 60 KIAS
Final approach speed 60 KIAS
Max canopy-open speed 90 KIAS
V S1 (stall, clean) 47 KIAS
V S0 (stall, landing configuration) 43 KIAS


TB
Over the years and locations of fabrication some of the Chipmunk specifications have varied.

The gross weight has changed.
The recommended speed for various aerobatics have changed.
Some were not equipped with electric starters and some were.
The positive and negative G ratings have changed.

I think the above specs are typical of the most recent production.

Zor
Old 07-06-2014, 02:58 AM
  #25  
TonyBuilder
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (11)
 
TonyBuilder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Austin , TX
Posts: 4,166
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default

#1. Tonybuilder
#2. DavidAgar
#3. ThunderBoat42
#4. Zor (honorary chippie brother)


TB

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.