Go Back  RCU Forums > Glow Engines, Gas Engines, Fuel & Mfg Support Forums > RC Fuels
 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know? >

4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Notices
RC Fuels Nitromethane, Castor Oil, Synthetic, heli fuel, 4 stroke, etc...Fuel Q&A is here!

4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Old 01-04-2004, 04:05 PM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

I've read an enormous amount of information about 4 stroke fuel now. I've read articles that show scientific proof why less oil is better and different articles why 4 strokes need more oil. On the Wildcat website, they explain that 4-strokes need more oil than 2 strokes...but their 4 stroke fuel only has 15-16%. There is a fuel FAQ running around somewhere on the Internet that explains that 4 strokes need less oil....because the same oil is in the engine longer. My conclusion is that no one really knows. So I'm giving up on that question.

Now, my question is what is better in a 4-stroke. Castor or Synth.?

The Wildcat website says 100% synth.
YS must think Synth because they recommend the 20/20 which seems to be 100% synth.
My engine says a mixture of both are best.

How can there be so much disagreement? Does noone know the answer to this question either?
Old 01-04-2004, 10:28 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
RaceCity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: NotUpNorth
Posts: 1,839
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

There is no "real" answer to your question unfortunately.

The castor/synth debate has raised the blood pressure of many people on this, and other
forums related to r/c.

Castor has unparalleled performance at high temperatures. When synthetics have burned
away....castor is still there..lubricating.

But....castor will leave a residue that in time,will carbonize and need to be removed.

Synthethics run clean. There is little, if any residue left over and the lack of residue is
IMO sometimes interpreted as "better".

The fact that it "vanishes" without a trace should bother you.

Fuel manufacturers have a vested interest in convincing you that their "special" oil is better.

Truth is...if it's so "special"...why doesn't the whole world use it?

Dirty or not. Castor stays while the others burn away.

My philosophy is simple. It's cheaper to remove residue than it is to replace metal. Your 4C engine
represents a sizeable investment. Better to take care of it.

I'd suggest a fuel that contains at least SOME castor if you intend to keep your engine for
any length of time. Fuels such as Powermaster, Omega, etc...have ample oil/castor content
to keep your motor running well for a long time.

Hope this helps.

'Race
Old 01-04-2004, 10:46 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Well the thing is I'm going to make my own fuel for my 4-stroke

But do I make a fuel like-

Wildcats: 18% oil, 100% synth
Wildcat recommends the lubrication package be totally synthetic. The use of synthetic oil is important in four stroke engines to prevent gumming and varnishing of the lifters and coking of the valves. Varnishing will occur on castor based fuels. This can lead to sticking valves, which will cause the valve set to get knocked out of time. Coking of the valves will cause improper seating of the valves causing a reduction in compression and incomplete combustion. Four stroke engines also have high exhaust gas temperatures and the use of synthetics greatly reduces carboning at the exhaust ports.

or like...
Omega: 17% oil, 50% synth, 50% castor

or like...
Powermasters YS 20/20: 20% Oil All-Synthetic

or more like....
Powermasters other 4-stroke fuel: 15% Oil Synthetic Castor Blend (most likely 70:30)
+++++

As you can see, you can get a 4 stroke fuel anywhere from 15 to 20% oil and anywhere from 0% to 50% castor. There are bigger differences in 4-stroke fuel than 2 stroke fuel.
Old 01-05-2004, 10:12 AM
  #4  
My Feedback: (102)
 
Hobbsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Colonial Beach, VA
Posts: 20,370
Likes: 0
Received 25 Likes on 25 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Throw, I have never agreed with that idea, I ran my Enya .46MKII, Saito .80 and 150 for about three years on Fox 15% fuel with 20% castor with no ill effects at all.
Old 01-05-2004, 06:06 PM
  #5  
Bax
My Feedback: (11)
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Monticello, IL
Posts: 19,483
Likes: 0
Received 6 Likes on 5 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Four-stroke engines tend to run a much lower temperatures than do the two-strokers. This means that you can use synthetic oil quite well. With rich running, synthetic oil will greatly reduce the varnish and carbon buildup you'd see in two-stroke engines.

Also because of the lower operating temperatures, you can get away with a bit less oil. With a few exceptions, all of the O.S. Max four-stroke engines can be run on fuels with the oil content as low as 16%. With hotter-running engines, the oil is used to help carry away the engine's heat. Synthetics will do this nicely until the engine gets too hot, where it vaporizes and, PRESTO!, no oil. Castor will start to turn to varnish, but will still protect the engine somewhat.

We have no problems with anyone using a fuel with all-synthetic oil in a four-stroke engine. The main thing to consider is that most fuels with synthetic oils do not provide the corrosion protection the lower-end of your engine needs. This means that you have to make sure you get a LOT of a good-quality after-run product into the lower-end of the engine at the end of the flying day. You'd be surprised to see how fast the bearings and crank can corrode if you don't.

For convenience, though, we'd suggest that you use the same 18% oil-content fuel in your four-stroke engines as you do in your two-strokes. If you use a synthetic-castor blend in your 2-strokes, then it won't hurt your four-strokes.

Good-quality fuel is the main requirement. If you use a good-quality fuel, you should have no engine problems caused by the fuel.
Old 01-05-2004, 06:17 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: Bax
If you use a synthetic-castor blend in your 2-strokes, then it won't hurt your four-strokes.
Well my TT .91FS is choking up gobs of black tar/soot into the tank from the muffler on Powermaster. So something in the fuel is burning up besides the Methanol and creating soot. Supposedly that can't happen to castor (not hot enough)...so it has to be the synth.

[But thats a guess.....seems no-one knows for sure.]
Old 01-05-2004, 06:28 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: Bax

Also because of the lower operating temperatures, you can get away with a bit less oil.
This is what I mean by no-one agrees.

Granted what you say is true. But, according to Wildcat, the only way oil can get to the bearings/crankcase for instance is blow by....so you need more oil to compensate for the fact that there is no direct fuel/oil mix pumping to that region of the motor.

http://www.wildcatfuel.com/fuel_24cycle.html

"First - Four stroke engines require more lubrication than do 2-stroke engines. This is do to the number of moving parts. Unlike a 2-stroke, a 4-stroke does not have the benefit of raw fuel and oil pumping through its crankcase for lubrication. A 4-stroke draws it's fuel in from the top of the cylinder by the down stoke of the piston. Lubrication is accomplished by blow-by at the BDC (bottom dead center) and run-down of oil through the lifter tubes. This oil must migrate to the bearings as well, therefore, volume is essential. (See disassembled 4-stroke -vs- 2-stroke below for comparision). Yes, despite the nonsense that some would try to get you to believe it's that simple."

There is an incredible amount of disagreement in this area
Old 01-12-2004, 09:12 PM
  #8  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

2MuchThrow,
I couldn't agree with you more. I can't even get past the "To Castor Or Not To Castor" question concerning four stroke motors let alone how much nitro or oil content. I was running CoolPower 15% in my Saito and then was told that 18% oil was not enough. Oh my goodness it is all synthetic as well. I know better than to overheat a 2 stroke so, for me synthetic was fine. Besides, Castor in a 2 stroke ringed motor just means you will gum it up and spend more time sooner fixing that.

I think we need a manufacturers rep from all of the four stroke companies to recomend at least a safe percentage of castor/synthetic/nitro blend without the wishy washy this is ok and that is ok and no real recomendation. To complicate things, some fuels are great about telling how much of what is in which products in their line. Others are not so good.

So what is the best fuel for our nitro swilling bump stickers? Is Blow-By a really good lubrication method for a crankshaft? With that much Blow-By, arn't we loosing some of the power potential? Seems to me that my four stroke is bordering on if not surpassing my 2 strokes in fuel inefficency when you compare how much raw fuel and oil are deposited on the Ultracoat.
Old 01-13-2004, 11:46 AM
  #9  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: errolw98
To complicate things, some fuels are great about telling how much of what is in which products in their line. Others are not so good.
And the most secret of all mixes are the 4 stroke combinations. Sig, Powermaster and many others completely secret on the 4 stroke mix question.
Old 01-13-2004, 12:29 PM
  #10  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Makes it easy dont it.
Old 01-13-2004, 12:43 PM
  #11  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Its obvious to me no-one really knows.

I think everyone is just pretending like they know...
Old 01-13-2004, 01:17 PM
  #12  
My Feedback: (102)
 
Hobbsy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Colonial Beach, VA
Posts: 20,370
Likes: 0
Received 25 Likes on 25 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

This fuel thing is just like the glow plug thing, some guys say the OSf is the only way to go, I have ten Saitos, three YSs and two Enya fourstrokes that say different. The Fox Miracle plug and the H9 SuperPlug work just as well except in my Saito .30 in which the H9 plug works best. I've used Wildcat fuel for several years now and have had zero problems, so I think I know. But some guy whose run a 12x4 on his Saito .72 is going to fry the bearings and blame the fuel or the bearings or both and he'll say that I don't know jack stuff. So where does that leave us? Simply put, run the fuel you like.
Old 01-13-2004, 01:24 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

So TRUE....I hear what you are saying. I agree. I use the Fox Miracle plug too and have to listen to folks say it won't work...you have to be using a $9.00 OS plug or your engine will explode or it won't work. I just say "Yeh, your right and then tighten up my Miracle plug and go flew".

With the fuel thing, I was trying to make my own and so its a bit more complicated. I guess I will need to try and experiment with several blends and find out what works best for myself. I'm fairly sure that just about any kind of oil that is at least 12% or better is probably fine for a short decision making process anyways.
Old 01-13-2004, 10:26 PM
  #14  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

2Much,

Are you going to mix all of the components, i.e. Methanol, Oil, Nitromethane and maybe something special? Where do you even get all the ingredients to blend?

I think you have the right idea though. Mix what you want to try. Try it and then decide or tweak it from there. I would be curious how that works for you and if you were able to produce something you were not only satisfied with but was cost effective as well. Most of us little guys probably can't buy most of the ingredients at the purity level of the fuel manufactures in the quantity that would make it feesable to put that kind of effort into it. Unless you come up with the magic blend that blows everything else away for you. Then again, who really knows if they are getting the purity levels they claim or think they are? I know they test the stuff but you can't test all of it.
Old 01-14-2004, 09:33 AM
  #15  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jonkoping, SWEDEN
Posts: 1,301
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

IMHO, nobody really knows what the best 4-stroke fuel is. I do however take advice on fuels from the engine manufacturers seriously. After all, it is in the engine manufacturers own interest to provide the best advice possible.
SAITO recommends a mixture containing 20% oil and 10-15% nitro. As for the oil: "Use of fuels composed entirely of castor oil is not recommended. A mix of synthetic-castor is acceptable...". From that I presume that all-synthetic lubricants are O.K.
Indeed, tests in German model-aircraft magazines some years ago showed that there is significantly lower wear in engines run with all-synthetic lubricants, as compared to engines run with castor oil.

As for the fuel manufacturers: Oil is much more expensive than methanol and nitro. Therefore it is in their interest to use as little oil as possible in their fuels, whilst not generating too many complaints about worn out or damaged engines. Adding a couple of percents of castor oil helps them get away with this. The reason is that castor oil is an excellent lubricant at high temperatures. When an engine is run too lean or is overheating to the extent that the synthetic lubricants break-down or evaporate, the castor oil forms a resinous coating that protects the engine. This resinous coating is very hard to remove though...

As compared to castor oil synthetic lubricants exhibit the following advantages:

+ significantly lower engine wear
+ no carbon build up
+ easy to clean off aircraft
+ works very well in cold conditions (important for me at latitude 60 deg north)

but there are disadvantages as well:

- expensive
- little protection against damages due to lean runs and/or overheating
- less protection against corrosion damage (some synthetic lubricants contains additives to address this issue)
- possibly a lot less environmentally friendly (the manufacturers provide little or no information, shame on you!)
- the smell and taste is g.d. awful! (I don't drink the stuff but occasionally get it on my fingers)

In the end the choice is down to you:
If you are experienced enough to avoid lean runs and overheating my advice is to go 100% synthetic.
If you experience the odd lean run or overheating situation go for fuel with some castor-oil in it.
If you care about the environment and possibly your own health, don't mind about removing carbon deposits and don't care about the increased wear (not significant unless you fly hundred of hours each year) go for castor-oil (applies to 2-stroke engines only).
As for the percentage: Unless you know better follow the ENGINE manufacturer's recommendation.

For many years I used castor oil exclusively but have since switched to synthetic lubricants 100%.
For my SAITO engines I have reduced the oil content to 15%. Even though two of the engines have been run for a couple of hundred hours they still look and feel as new when dismantled.
And yes, I do mix my own fuel!

/Red B.
Old 01-14-2004, 01:26 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: errolw98

2Much,

Are you going to mix all of the components, i.e. Methanol, Oil, Nitromethane and maybe something special? Where do you even get all the ingredients to blend?
You can get Methanol and Nitro at any speed shop. You can purchase Castor and Klotz from Sig and Tower and a few others.

There is nothing special about model airplane fuel. People use to make it once upon a time because there was really about the only option.
Old 01-14-2004, 01:28 PM
  #17  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: Red B.

For many years I used castor oil exclusively but have since switched to synthetic lubricants 100%.
For my SAITO engines I have reduced the oil content to 15%. Even though two of the engines have been run for a couple of hundred hours they still look and feel as new when dismantled.
And yes, I do mix my own fuel!

/Red B.
Can I ask what kind of synthetic to you use at 100%, 15% total content? Because about the only thing that has the potential to really be different is the synth lube.
Old 01-14-2004, 01:31 PM
  #18  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

If you wanted a synthetic oil instead of castor or to make a blend, I guess you could go to your local Motocross bike shop for your favorite synthetic oil as well. Is the price for Methanol and Nitro resonable?
Old 01-14-2004, 01:42 PM
  #19  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

ORIGINAL: errolw98

If you wanted a synthetic oil instead of castor or to make a blend, I guess you could go to your local Motocross bike shop for your favorite synthetic oil as well. Is the price for Methanol and Nitro resonable?
I pay about $2.75/gallon for MeOH and about $30-32/gallon for Nitro. I think that is about average. If you buy more at a time, you get a better price.

I'm sure any Motocross 2 cycle synthetic would probably work but since the synth is the most "iffy" part, I tend to go with a synthethic I know will mix with alcohol and is used in racing or has at least been proven in that application.
Old 01-14-2004, 08:00 PM
  #20  
 
downunder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Adelaide, AUSTRALIA
Posts: 4,527
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

While it's fine to have an opinion on the merits of castor/synthetics based on experience, sometimes it can help to get an unbiased view on the technical side of things. If you read post #2 in the following link you'll find an article written by the Senior Research Engineer of an oil company who just happened to be a modeller as well.
http://www.clstunt.com/htdocs/dcforu...mID1/7221.html

As for how the bottom end of a 4 stroke gets lubricated, I have sincere doubts that blowby is the agent for transferring oil. As someone pointed out, blowby means loss of power and any noticeable amount would be seen or felt streaming out of the breather nipple. To the best of my knowledge, all 4 strokes have rings and this is what I believe transfers the oil from the liner down to the crankcase. The rings act as oil scrapers much the same as the bottom ring does in car engines. In particular this would happen on the power stroke when combustion pressure gets behind the ring to force it harder against the liner. Using rings as scrapers would give a more consistent (and controllable) flow of oil than blowby over the life of the engine. Just my opinion
Old 01-14-2004, 08:22 PM
  #21  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
My Feedback: (7)
 
3d-aholic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Round Rock, TX
Posts: 2,024
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Well blow-by may not be the correct name...that term is used by WildCat http://www.wildcatfuel.com/fuel_24cycle.html. However, the process you describe of the rings pulling the oil down is the same as they describe. They also describe oil running down the lifter tubes...but it is unclear to me if this is "used exhaust" based oil or not.

In any case, their case is that unlike 2 strokes, the bearings on 4-strokes are "indirectly" lubed. And because they are indirectly lubed, the quantity of oil is important.
Old 01-15-2004, 02:28 AM
  #22  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Jonkoping, SWEDEN
Posts: 1,301
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

2MuchThrow:
Can I ask what kind of synthetic to you use at 100%, 15% total content? Because about the only thing that has the potential to really be different is the synth lube.
I use Aerosynth which is readily available where I live (Sweden).
/Red B.
Old 01-15-2004, 03:54 AM
  #23  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Downunder

Our 4 stroke engines have only one ring, At any given time in any piston engine, there is no absence of a ring end gap or it would create enough friction when the end gaps touched, to remove the oil film and sieze in the cyl. In extreme cases the thermal growth of the ring, with its ends touching, is enough to make its outside diameter larger than the cyl inside diameter. Either scenerio will cause an early failure. With this in mind and the fact that our fuel is the only means for our engines to receive oil, the ring end gap is in fact what is lubricating our bottom end with blow by fuel oil mix. Some will also travel up the valve guides (mainly the exhaust) and find its way through the pushrod tubes to the bottom end but this is secondary to our bottom end and benefits the valve guide. Since we only intend to use our oil once, we can accept the cleaner combustion byproducts from our fuel and use it to lubricate the bottom end of the motor. When this oil builds up to the point that it reaches the crank vent nipple, we just let it blow out. This still allows plenty of compression for our engines to function at a pretty high performance level. With all of that oil on top of our pistons, we get a big boost in the seal for gassious compression and still force a fairly large quantity down through the ring end gap. There is also a negative pressure developed in the crankcase when the piston is on each upstroke helping to pull some of the remaining oil on top of the piston down through the ring end gap on the exhaust stroke.

If your crankcase nipple dosen't emit some oil, then your system isn't working properly. You can test this after a day of flying by removing your glow plug, tipping your airplan/engine to a position that makes your crank vent nipple the low point and turn your prop several times by hand. The positive crankcase pressure developed on the piston downstroke is enough to begin to push the collected oil out through the vent. if you have a drain tube on the vent, the negative crankcase pressure on the piston upstroke will start to draw it back into the crankcase. Some engines, like the Saito 100 have a relitively high crank vent nipple while others like an RCV seem to put them right on the bottom so you may have more or less residule oil in your crankcase. But if you listen to the vent hose or put a finger near the end, you will experience the crankcase pressure cycle.
Old 01-26-2004, 12:31 AM
  #24  
My Feedback: (29)
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: fort worth, TX
Posts: 1,502
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

Try connecting a small fuel tank to your crankcase vent. I have found that about half of the total oil comes out of it, most of the alcohol is gone, as the oil is very thick. A two stroke's rod has to be lubed with oil that is still dilluted with a lot of alcohol. A YS also has to deal with this. A standard four stroke will live a normal life on 10% oil content. All the original four stroke fuel had low oil content because the engines ran more consistantly on it. As you lower the oil content in a two stroke the rod will tend to fail before the piston sticks, depending on the piston-liner metalurgy. If YS engines never came on the market there still might be low oil four stroke fuel.
Old 01-26-2004, 01:38 AM
  #25  
My Feedback: (1)
 
RCXPLANES's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Central Point, OR
Posts: 535
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Default RE: 4-stroke fuel--Does anyone really know?

2Much,

Make sure you vent that fuel tank/catch can arangement.

Kweasel,

What part of the rod fails on a two stroke before piston siezure? The small end at the wrist pin?

I guess a brave heart could blend the oil content down by mixing the correct ratio of mehtanol and nitro into their current 4 stroke fuel and give it a whirl.

RedB's point is still valid. Nobody really seems to know for sure.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Manage Preferences Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.